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XE.M JkENXS 







VOL. XLV, No. 10 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1917 

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PRICE TEN CENTS 



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VARIETY 



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• 



HARRY WEBER 



• 






Presents 






The Greatest Sketch Novelty 
Vaudeville Has Ever Had 






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EMILY ANN 

WELLMAN 






in 



a 



A FLASH DRAMA" 

By EDWARD EISNER 









Unanimously Pronounced a Success 

by the Managers, Public and Press 



Two Weeks at The Palace Theatre, New York 

Jan. 29 and Feb. 5 



Management, Chamberlain Brown 



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VOL. XLV, No. 10 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



CABARET REVUES SUBJECT TO 
LICENSE, SAYS COMMISSIONER 

Believes U. S. Supreme Court Decision Stamping Restaurant 

Giving Entertainments, as Doing So for Profit, Covers 

Matter of Theatrical License for Cabarets. If 

Pressed, May Drive Revues Out of Restaurants. 



Commissioner of Licenses Bell is 
about to launch an active campaign to 
compel the cabarets of New York 
where revue ' performances are pre- 
sented to operate under a theatrical li- 
cense. The commissioner contends 
the recent decision of the United States 
Supreme Court, in the copyright case, 
sustains the contention held by him- 
self and the Corporation Counsel that 
the performances were given for profit 

It is believed the first case which will 
be brought will be against Rector's. 
In the event the License Bureau wins 
it is possible the Building and Fire De- 
partments will compel the restaurants 
to meet the requirements that govern 
buildings in which theatrical perform- 
ances are presented. In that event 
practically all of the restaurant revues 
would have to be abandoned. It is a 
question whether or not individual sing- 
ers would come under the ban. 

There are at present only two revues 
operating under a regular theatrical 
license. They are the "Midnight 
Frolic" and the Cocoanut Grove, both 
of which charge admission. 

Several of the restaurants in which 
revues are being given have made it a 
strong point in their advertising of the 
last few days that no couvert charge 
was being made, and that in spite of 
the added attractions offer the "same 
reasonable priced bill of fare is in 
force." 

Commissioner Bell does not appear 
to have considered the question of 
Sunday performances of the cabaret 
revues. Regarding the "cover" charge, 
that is, in his estimation, equivalent 
to an admission charge to see a per- 
formance. 

In a restaurant giving a revue per- 
formance without a theatrical license 
Vt wivs held in the matter of Maxim's 
restaurant some months ago on a local 
complaint that as no charge was given 
at the door, the performance did not 
come under the heading of theatrical, 
and the regulation theatrical license 
was not required. The New York au- 
thorities were governed by that local 



decision until the Supreme Court of 
the country laid down the law on the 
subject 

CANADA GROWING STRICT. 

Winnipeg, Jan. 31. 

The managers of Winnipeg's three 
vaudeville houses (Orpheum. Pantmget 
and Strand) have been informed by 
the Dominion immigration office that 
hereafter all actors and actresses ap- 
pearing on their bills will be required to 
furnish either birth certificate! or nat- 
uralization papers, showing they are 
residents of countries other than Ger- 
many, Austria, Turkey or Bulgaria. 

It is the intention of the Dominion, 
it is inferred from this notification, to 
shut down on the entrance into Canada 
of any artist who belongs to a country 
at war with Great Britain. 



ENGLISH CLUB TITLE. 

The English contingent, comfortably 
quartered in the Lambs' Club, are be- 
ginning to feel the American member- 
ship is too readily given to taunting 
them as "slackers," and they are ser- 
iously considering the formation of a ♦ 
club with the membership confined ex- 
clusively to English actors. 

A group of those most active in com- 
pleting the preliminary arrangements 
asked William Collier to suggest a title 
for the new club, and the comedian 
immediate 1 " suggested it be named 
"The Pan America Club." 



BOSTON'S PARK SQUARE CHANGE. 

Boston, Jan. 31. 

There is a persistent rumor the Park 
Square theatre may pass from the Sel- 
wyns to Oliver Morosco at the end of 
the season unless "Fair and Warmer" 
puts the house on the right side of the 
sheet. 

This house is one of Boston's best, 
built for John Cort, who put his son, 
John "Eddie" Cort in as manager. 

The present manager for the Selwyns 
is Fred E. Wright, a veteran, with a 
heavy personal following. The lack of 
better business this season is attrib- 
uted locally to poor booking and not 
through any fault of Wright, 



INVESTORS STUNG. 

Montreal, Tan. 31. 

It looks now as though all the in- 
vestors in the St Dennis theatre* in 
this city will lose their money, as 
liquidators have been appointed for 
the theatre holding company, which 
placed and sold stock to the public be- 
fore building the house. 

The St. Dennis has played pictures. 
Its overhead expense was beyond rea- 
son and the expense of operating also 
high. The venture was promoted by 
local people who are said to have is- 
sued the usual alluring prospectus of 
the possible earning capacity of a pic- 
ture theatre, but found theory and 
practice very different. 

The St. Dennis was located poorly, 
on a side street that held no oppor- 
tunity whatsoever for transient busi- 
ness. 

The theatre cost between 1400,000 
and $500,000 to build. About $250,000 
of that amount was subscribed by out- 
side investors, who purchased small 
blocks of stocks. The net loss since 
the St Dennis opened, about a vear ago, 
is reported at around $75,000. 

"BERNHARDT HANDICAP." 

New Orleans, Jan. 31. 

The Racing Association here named 
its principal handicap Monday "The 
Sarah Bernhardt Event" in honor of 
the French actress playing at the Tu- 
lane. Mme. Bernhardt was present at 
the track and presented the winner of 
the race with a diamond ring, which had 
been given to her by Princess Eugenie. 

It is reported Bernhardt will not 
play Texan dates, information having 
been supplied the time there is not 
profitable. 

CHORUS GIRLS FROM Y. W. C. A. 

The scarcity of chorus girls in New 
York just now received added confirm- 
ation when one agency, pressed to ful- 
fill a commission for choristers, applied 
to the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

The employment department of the 
Y. W. C. A. informed the agency its 
standing would first have to be investi- 
gated and also the grade of employ- 
ment to be given. 



"ALWOOD," WOOD'S CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The name of the new A. H. Woods 
theatre will be the "Alwood." Work 
will begin in May. It is expected to 
have the house completed in September 
and the opening attraction will prob- 
ably be "Cheating Cheaters." 

In addition- £c- Utc tYveatrc, thers- v;i!l 
be a 16-story office building, work upon 
which will be continued after the thea- 
tre will have been completed. 

The "Alwood" will seat 1,250. Its 
location at the corner of Dearborn and 
Randolph is as ideal as any within the 
"Loop." 



ZIEGFELD GIRLS LEAVING. 

This Saturday will see a trio of Zieg- 
feld beauties leaving "The Midnight 
Frolic" on the Amsterdam Roof. They 
arc Olive Thomas, Marjorie Cassidy 
and Marjorie Beverly, with Ziegfeld 
shows for several seasons. The Misses 
Thomas and Cassidy are reported go- 
ing to the Coast and it is also reported 
that while out there, Miss Thomas' 
marriage to Jack Pickford will occur, 
if that has not alreadv happened. 

Miss -Beverly is leaving the Roof per- 
formance for a rest 

Eddie Cantor, now a feature on the 
Roof, was engaged this week by Flo 
Ziegfeld for two years under contract. 
Claudius and Scarlet, another of the 
"Frolic's" attractions, was placed under 
a one year's agreement by the same 
manager. 

Ziegfeld and Dillingham, the Cen- 
tury managers, where Van and Schenck 
are appearing (uostairs and down) gave 
a contract for three years this week to 
the two boys. 









POP PRICE INDOOR CIRCUS. 

Negotiations for a summer circus to 
be installed at Durland's Riding Acad- 
emy, at 66th street and Central Park 
west, three blocks north of the Cen- 
tury theatre, are under way with Ar- 
thur Bennett as the leasing party. If 
the matter is adjusted within the next 
two weeks, an indoor circus at prices 
ranging from 25 cents to $1 will open 
there in April. 

Bennett id well known to the literary 
world as L. B. Yates, having contrib- 
uted a number of circus and race track 
stories to the "Saturday Evening Post, H 
Hearst's and other popular magazines. 
Bennett was general press representa- 
tive for the Ringling interests for sev- 
eral years and knows the circus game 
as well as anyone. 

Durland's now is used as a riding 
academy, but reconstruction plans will 
permit a 3,500 seating capacity. The 
plan is to run the indoor circus affair 
12 weeks. 









ORPHEUM'S MOORE, SEATTLE 

Seattle, Jan. 31. 

The Moore Theatre* here has been 
leased by the Orpheum Circuit and will 
open next August as the regular local 
stand for the circuit, which is now play- 
ing its vaudeville at the Alhambra. 

Fred Henderson executed the lease. 
It runs 10 years. 



WALTER PRODUCING HIS OWN. 

Eugene Walter is going into pro- 
rJviWo'tr :ou b'i*5 ••wm. Hf//i wjIJ.viKh:-' i4 .Th<r 
Knife v in rehearsal Under the direction 
of Harry Mcystayer within the next 
week or so. 

The plav was in the A. II. Woods 
office for some time. 

If you don't advortUo In VARIETY, 
doo't advvrtlff. 



CA^BTLES 



ENGLISH HALLS COMPETITION 
MAKING IT GOOD FOR ARTISTS 



Engaging Acts for Certain Periods Several Years in Advance 
by One Circuit Opposing Another Leaves Wide 
for Acts. Managerial Scramble for Good Turns 

at Present. 



London, Jan. 31. 
There are surface indications of ser- 
ious clash between two of the big mu- 
sic hall circuits here. It came to light 
recently through the Variety Theatres 

Controlling Co. offering acts fifteen 
weeks each season in the West End for 
a period of five years, in direct compe- 
tition to the London Theatres of Var- 
ieties (Gulliver Tour). 

The Variety Co. is presided over by 
Alfred Butt and Walter DeFrece. It 
controls a large circuit of provincial 
variety theatres more or less in compe- 
tition with the Gulliver houses and the 
circuits are in direct opposition in the 
heart of London. The Variety Con- 
trolling people are, according to re- 
port, about to erect another house in 
Leicester square, to be operated along 
the lines of the highly successful Vic- 
toria Palace and they have come to thev 
conclusion straight vaudeville bills are 
the most' profitable. Whenever Gul- 
liver's Palladium puts on a straight 
vaudeville program the reeipts are far 
in excess of revues, and the further in- 
disputable fact that Oswald Stoll's 
Coliseum, which has adhered to the 
vaudeville policy, always returns hand- 
some dividends. The Palladium has 
experimented with revues and Christ- 
mas pantomimes, with uncertain suc- 
cess and Stoll's experiment of moving 
his London opera house revue to the 
Coliseum proved disastrous and was 
abandoned after one week. 

With the dearth of good vaudeville 
material, owing to the non-importation 
of foreign talent, the scramble for good 
turns has assumed serious proportions. 
The engaging of acts for a period of 
years, with an increase of salary each 
season, places the artists in a very 
enviable position at this time. 

The artists have the alternative of 
playing for Miss Empires or Stoll in 
the event their demands are not met 
by the competing managers. 

CONTINENTAL HIT WAVE 

Berlin, Jan. 20. 

"Czardas Countess" is being played 
at present in about 90 continental cities 
ana towns. It's the operetta by Em- 
merich Kalman, and is nOw in its sec- 
ond consecutive year at the Qohann 
Strauss theatre, Vienna, where it has 
played without intermission. The op- 
era is about finishing its first solid year 
at the Metropole, this city. The Kiraly, 
Budapest, and Oskar Teatern, Stock- 
holm, also have it. 

In the provinces of Germany 36 com- 
panies (stock) are now playing the 
"Countess"; 28 in the Austrian prov- 
inces, 15 in Hungary and four in Scan- 
dinavia. 

Kalman, according to report, wiU 
have realized between $150,000 and 
$200,000 in royakies before his huge hit 
closes its second year. 

The rights to the music of the opera 
for America arc reported having been 
secured by an American music publish- 
ing house. 

Kmmerich Kalman is the composer 
of the score of "Miss Springtime" at the 
Amsterdam theatre, one of the musical 
liit< r.f \rw York's present «en«on. 

1 "{ i < : r ( ■ ;• '. j iz ' :>j r '. s ?.>?..■■ i j ) r 6 ^a r.icd ■ a r, 
one of the composers of "Her Soldier 
r.oy" at the Astor, although it is under- 
stock! the "Soldier Boy" musical drama 
was the first Kalman wrote (10 years 



ago) and was never copyrighted, with 
but a song and a half of the score as 
sung at the Astor really Kalman's. The 
half song in "Her Soldier Boy" belong- 
ing to him, say those who know his 
music, is the chorus of one number, the 
first verse of which was rewritten in a 
vainly attempted imitation of Kalman's 
style. 



LONDON RUN ENDING. 

"Potash & Perlmutter in Society" 
will close its London engagement at 
the Queen's, Feb. 10. 



"ZIG ZAG" POSTPONED. 

London, Jan. 31. 
The new Hipoodrome show has been 
postponed on account of the delay in 
completing the scenery and costumes, 
that branch of the industry being, like 
many others, short-handed. The show 
is entitled "Ziz Zag." Ned Wayburn 
staged it. He predicts it will prove the 
best show ever put on at the Hip. Way- 
burn adds that Shirley Kellogg is 
splendid, judging by rehearsals and 
that Daphne Pollard, a dark horse, has 
some excellent material. 



BENSON'S SUCCESS. 

London, Ian. 31. 
At the Palladium, Benson s variety 
debut, in well-selected extracts entitled 
"Shakespeare's War Cry," is a suc- 
cess. 



FELICE LYNNE AT HALLS. 

London, Jan. 31. 
Felice Lynn wil make her debut in 
the halls Feb. 5, at the Coliseum, in 
operatic selections. 



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FRANK VAN HOVEN 

As thr above will show, has plnveri before the 
King and Queen of England, and since his de- 
parture from the United States has appeared 
ic fore royalty of many countries, among them 
being Queen Alexandra, the Grand Duke Michael 
of Russia and Duchess, the Queen of Portugal, 
and the royal children of the King and Queen 
of Belgium. 

And just think, only a few years ago he was 
appearing in the kitchen of a cheap restaurant 
washing dishes and jealous of the cook who 
got eight dollart 
four. 



•s a week while Van only got 



Regards to Von Hampton and Shriner and 
O,.o. Wilrr.-'.r.-, j-.ui v.;nvrc*. I v!w»vi Un.-nv ;4uw;i, 
tut'tHfy "c vi-'le n t J v kivm rv.e. Royalties may 
be sent me care VARIETY, or Eccentric Club, 
J-ondon. 

Anderson, card manipulator, formerly office 
assistant Bamberg Magic Co., write me. I 

have important pcwi, mj Ud. 



DANCING AT N. V. A. 

At the repeated requests of mem- 
bers visiting the National Vaudeville 
Artists' club rooms since its opening 
last week, the officers in charge have 
decided to clear the main room after 
theatre time and permit dancing there. 

Up to Wednesday Secretary Chester- 
field had received over 100 new appli- 
cations for active 1 membership. Of the 
limited 100 lay members to be accepted, 
39 filed applications during the past 
week. 



RESIGNS AFTER 23 TEARS. 

London, Jan. 31. 

Billy Dawes, for 23 years manager of 
the Gaiety, has resigned. 

"Theodore and Co" celebrated its 
150th performance there, ajn. 30. 



A TERRT ENGAGED. 

London, Jan. 31. 
Dennis Neilson Terry, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Terry, is engaged to marry 
Mary Glynne. Both are members of 
Sir George Alexander's St. James com- 
pany. 



WAR DRAMA'S HIT. 

London, Jan. 31. 

Louis N. Parker's drama of the 
French Revolution, produced at the 
St. James', is a pronounced success. 

Sir George Alexander, Genevieve 
Ward and Mary Glynne are splendid in 
the cast. 



MART ANDERSON APPEARS. 

London, Jan. 31. 

Mary Anderson, as was to be ex- 
pected, was accorded an enthusiastic 
reception when she appeared Monday 
at the Coliseum in the balcony scene 
from "Romeo and Juliet," with Basil 
Gill as Romeo to her Juliet. 

Dooley and Sayles, on the same bill; 
were well received and are likely to be- 
come great favorites here. 



JIMMY BRITT BACK. 

After a tour of nearly two years, dur- 
ing which engagements were played by 
him in England, Australia, India and 
South Africa, Jimmv Britt returned to 
New York late last week, having 
reached Boston direct from Cape 
Town. 

Mr. Britt, who ha3 now made his 
popularitv world wide, may re-enter 
vaudeville over here. 

Accompanying him on the return 
home was Henrv Clive, the magician, 
who left New York several years ago 
and remained in London. 



Van Hoven's Production Offer, $750. 

London, Jan. 31. 

Frank Van Hoven has received an 
offer of the leading comedy role in an 
English piece going to America short- 
ly, with a guarantee of eight weeks at 
a salary of $750 weekly. 

His agent here has agreed to set 
back his English vaudeville engage- 
ments, if he wishes to accept. 



Influenza Prevalent in London. 

London, Jan. 31. 
Frank Allen and Oswald Stoll have 
recovered from influenza, prevalent here 
at present. 



New Scene in "Vanity Fair" Revival. 

London, Jan. 31. 
A new final scene was introduced in 
the "Vanity Fair" revival at the Pal- 
ace. "Minstrel Days," with the entire 
con;pany appearing. 



Robert Hale Selling Race Horse. 

London, Jan. 31. 

Robert ale is auctioning a four-year- 
old racehorse at Tattersall's, devoting 
the proceeds to the Red Cross Fund. 



French Players at Aldwych. 

London, Jan. 31. 
The French Flayers commenced this 
week a season at the Aldwych with a 
triple bill. 



IN PARIS. 

Paris, Jan. 20. 
In spite of expectations to the con- 
trary the French theatres and kindred 
enterprises were not omitted from the 
new budget when passed by the lower 
house, ft is therefore certain to be 
also voted by the Senate. Numerous 
petitions were brought before the com- 
mission while in session, explaining the 
difficulties the amusement world had to 
meet in order to earn a reasonable liv- 
ing, and the managers imagined they 
had a champion to their cause in the 
Minister of Fine Arts. That official had 
recognized some theatres were not ex- 
actly enjoying unadulterated prosperity 
during the present war, and he was in- 
clined to voice that opinion (and did), 
but his sympathies were mainly with 
the State" and municipal subventions^ 
houses throughout the country* P^w 
could believe the picture palaces were 
on the verge of starvation. Statistics, 
to be explained later, led politicians to 
imagine quite the reverse,* and the 
cinema was shown as wallowing in 
prosperity. Moreover, the low class 
legitimate productions, called farce, of 
certain resorts, poor undressed revues 
at some music halls, and the rottenness 
of many songs heard at quite a number 
of cafe chantants during past years', 
also aided to alienate kindlv feelings of 
French congressmen when it came to 
finding additional revenue. They had 
to vote more money and yet protect 
French Art The result was the extra 
tax on amusement tickets as proposed 
by the budget commission quickly 
passed the Chamber of Deputies. Ef- 
forts are being made by managers and 
syndicates to block it in the Senate, but 
there is every probability the bill will 
become law within a few days. 

The new taxes are divided into four 
categories: Theatres and opera sub- 
ventioned by the State and municipali- 
ties: 5 cents on each place occupied 
over $1, in Paris, and over 60 cents in 
the provinces. Theatres of private en- 
terprise: 2 cents tax on all tickets up to 
20 cents; 5 cents tax on places over 20 
cents to $1.60, and 10 cents tax over 
$1.60. The music halls and cafe chan- 
tants, circuses, cabarets, etc.: 4 cents 
tax on all tickets up to 30 cents; 8 cents 
tax from 31 cents to 80 cents; 12 cents 
tax from 81 cents to $2, and 20 cents 
tax for all seats above $2. Moving pic- 
tures: 5 per cent on monthly gross re- 
ceipts not exceeding $5,000; 10 per cent 
over $5,000 to $10,000; 20 per cent over 
$10,000 to $20,000, and 25 per cent tax 
on gross receipts if they exceed $20,000 
during a month. The usual poor rate 
of 10 per cent and all other forms of 
taxation, including the new income tax 
and increased municipal taxes, license, 
etc.. must be paid in addition. For the 
theatres there is the 10 per cent royalty 
to be paid authors' society, and for the 
music halls about 3 ner cent (except 
for revues over one hour, when it is 
10 per cent) to the composers* society 
for such French music as they may use, 
or supposed to use. The picture houses 
have a special arrangement with the 
society v to pay a fixed sum monthly. 

There are four theatres subventioned 
by the State in Paris, Opera, Opera- 
Comique, Comedie Francaise, Odeon. 
In most French cities there is an opera 
house owned or controlled by the mu- 
nicipality. 

The lighting question is still acute, 
but by the new decree restricting every-* 
body to a fifth of their former con- 
si .mption the theatres will be allowed 
to remain open all through the week if 
they so desire and can adopt their^ al- 
lowance of light to meet the situation. 
Conseouentlv there will be no official 
day-off at the majority of theatres. In- 
quiries made elicited the opinion the 
music hnlis will he ah!o to keep opsn. 
daily; by economizing light in the audi- 
torium and concentrating all to the 
stage and exits there will be no neces- 
sity to close even on Wednesday. 



VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIAM MORRIS AND PAT CASEY 
JOIN THEIR BOOKING AGENCIES 






Through Casey Connection Morris Will Book in United Book- 
ing Offices and Orpheum Circuit. Casey Retains General 
Managership of V. M. P. A. and Morris Holds 
Private Theatrical Enterprises for Himself* 



The booking agencies of William 
Morris and Pat Casey have been con- 
solidated in the Pat Casey agency suite 
in the Putnam Building. The arrange- 
ment of the two well-known vaudeville 
men for a booking combination per- 
mits Mr. Casey to continue as the gen- 
eral manager of the Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Protective Association and al- 
lows Mr. Morris to personally direct 
his theatrical ventures, including the 
Harry Lauder tours, with the Morris 
office for these enterprises remaining 
at 1482 Broadway, although Morris will 
make his principal headquarters in the 
Casey agency. 

While the Casey-Morris combination 
may surprise vaudeville in general it 
has been rumored about for some time, 
since Mr. Casey found the duties im- 
posed upon him as an officer of the V. 
M. P. A. interfering with the full at- 
tention he wished to give his booking 
agency. Mr. Morris, after reaching 
New York, following the close of the 
Eva Tanguay tour, had no immediate 
project to promote and the result of 
the consolidation came about through 
negotiations to pool their booking in- 
terests. 

The Morris-Casey office will book 
everywhere, it is said; with vaudeville 
specialized on. The dasey franchise in 
the United Booking Offices and 
Orpheum Circuit will give Morris ac- 
cess to the floors of those two circuits. 
It will be the first time Morris ever 
booked direct with U. B. O. Before 
the United was formed Morris booked 
for several of the managers which 
joined B. F. Keith at the formation of 
the U. B. O. Later Morris opposed 
the big time with a vaudeville circuit of 
his own, but of late years has only been 
concerned in vaudeville casually, al- 
though keeping current with it. 

The Casey Agencv was started sev- 
eral years ago, after Pat Casey had 
taken charge of the settlement con- 
nected with the abandonment of Klaw & 
Erlanger's Advanced Vaudeville in 1907. 
He has given his personal attention to 
vaudeville since then and is recognized 
as one of the best informed vaudevil- 
lians in this country. His handling of 
managerial mazes has been masterful 
and this in part had much to do with 
his recent appointment as the repre- 
sentative of the managers' association, 
although Casey is not a manager, nor is 
he interested financially in any Vaude- 
ville theatre. 

This is the second time within ten 
years Casey and Morris have been asso- 
ciated. Before becoming a part of 
"Advanced Vaudeville" (for which the 
Morris office did the booking) Pat 
Casey was connected with the William 
Morris office, although his familiarity 
with show business dated long before 
that. 

From the time William Morris left 
his own booking agency, he has had 
several tilts of one kind or another with 
big time managers. Acclaimed often in 
days past as the best booking man in 
vaudeville Morris was looked up to by 
the act of those days. 

10c STORES RAISE MUSIC PRICES. 

Detroit^ Jan. 31. 
The S. S. Kreske 10-cent stores, 
about 400 spread over this country, 
lately installed a "production music 
department," varying that from the 
popular price music counter by selling 



the production music at 25 cents a 
sheet, as against 10 cents for popular 
songs. 

Within the past two weeks, E. Wert- 
man, the music buyer for the 10-cent 
chain, issued orders to raise the price 
of the production music to 30 cents a 
copy, as an experiment. The move 
was so successfully put over that that 
price has been ordered permanent for 
the higher grade songs. 

The "25-cent department" for music 
in the 10-cent stores was a recent in- 
novation, caused by competition from 
local dealers who largely dealt in the 
"production" (musical shows) output 
as the dealers could not oppose the 
cheap-priced store on the other kind. 

The raise by the 10-cent stores to 30 
cents, for the high-class music will cor- 
respondingly bring the wholesale price 
from the publisher two or three cents 
more than was formerly charged to the 
jobber, it is said. 



BOOSTING O'ROURKE. 

Stephen O'Rouke, the Irish tenor, re- 
cently unearthed by Bart McHugh, is 
liable to be lifted right into the concert 
class if the plans of several Irish so- 
cieties in New York and Philadelphia 
materialize. O'Rouke is now playing 
in vaudeville. McHugh journeyed to 
New York this week at the request of 
a concert impresario to discuss plans 
to arrange a repertoire for a swing 
around the eastern concert field. 

It is understood some of the societies 
interested in O'Rourke have formerly 
sriven their entire support to John Mc- 
Cormack, but because of his universal 
popularity the well-known Irish tenor 
has found it impossible to appear when- 
ever and wherever his friends wished 
him to and the singer's supporters 
have switched their allegiance to the 
new "find." 

Stephen O'Rourke was practically 
unknown until McHugh recognized his 
vocal possibilities and with his recent 
New York debut the Irishman instant- 
ly found favor with that particular 
class of operatic patrons who prefer 
his brand of entertainment to the 
Italian and French specie. 



NORWORTH DIVORCE SUIT OFF 

Jack Norworth returned from Eng- 
land Sunday on the "St. Louis" and at 
once effected a reconciliation with his 
wife, who had brought suit against him 
for divorce. 

Mr. Norworth is now domiciled in 
an uptown apartment with Mrs. Nor- 
worth and their two children. 

Norworth will play vaudeville here 
for a few weeks, pending the com- 
pletion of a new play being written for 
him, in which he is to be starred in the 
spring, probably under the direction of 
A. H. Woods. He has also received a 
flattering proposition to appear in a 
scries of one-reel picture comedies. 



BOTH ON SAME BILLS. 

Montgomery and Perry and Florence 
Moore and Brother will play on the 
same bills throughout the middle west, 
commencing Feb. 12 in this city. 
■Bit lip. Montg'jrV.rry. jrntd Miss Moore 
v.ere formerly husband and wife, also 
a vaudeville team. 

Another Florence Moore, from the 
northwest, opens on the Pantages Cir? 
cuit at Minneapolis this Sunday. 



IN AND OUT. 

Joe Welch left the American bill, 
Chicago, the last half last week, owing 
to illness, and asked that his route be 
cancelled. Welch may go to some rest 
resort for the winter. Elsie White, 
owing to sickness, cancelled the Wilson 
Avenue, Chicago, the last half last 
week, and came to New York for medi- 
cal treatment. The Dohertys filled in. 

Leonard and Louie dropped out of 
the Delancy St. bill the first half 
through illness. Cummin and Seaham 
secured the spot. 

Devere and Malcom retired from the 
bill at the Royal after the Monday 
matinee, replaced by Reddington and 
Grant. 

Elenor Haber and Co. left the city 
after the Monday matinee. It was re- 
ported Miss Haber had been hit by a 
falling sand bag. "The Birthday 
Party" secured the place. 



BIRTHS. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Graham, 
son. Mrs. Graham was formerly in 
burlesque, known as Florence Fletcher, 
while Mr. Graham played in vaude- 
ville, of Graham and Porter, and is 
now with the Metro. 



BAYES IN CHICAGO. 

Nora Bayes will move her single 
whole show to Chicago, March 11, 
opening at the Playhouse in that city 
under the chaperonage of A. H. Woods. 
On the trip out Miss Bayes may play 
a town or two on a week stand as a 
test of her own entertainment for the 
road. Next season Woods, it is said, 
has a route of 35 weeks laid out for 
the Bayes show in the outside cities, the 
Bayes entertainment by that time to be 
' elaborated and padded, although the 
Bayes show as now given practically 
by herself at the Eltinge, New York, 
will be the one presented to Chicago. 

Miss Bayes has declined the tender of 
a big time vaudeville route for a con- 
densation of her present performance. 
About 15 weeks had been secured for 
her in the United Booking Offices. 
This week also Miss Bayes placed a 
salary of $1,000 a day for herself as a 
half of a revived Bayes and Nor- 
worth act, making it plain the prohibi- 
tive figure was set to prevent further 
discussion. 

Tonight (Friday) at Rye, N. Y., m 
the residence of Mrs. Edgar Palmer, 
Miss Bayes will give a performance 
from 9.30 until 10.15, for which she will 
receive $1,000. 

The entire Bayes show had an oppor- 
tunity to appear at the Cocoanut Grove 
in the Century Theatre but Miss Bayes 
preferred not to fight the waiters and 
diners. It is said the Grove manage- 
ment wanted her to substitute for the 
present performance there, principally 
Gertrude Hoffman's, who has given her 
notice to leave* the Grove and is pre- 
paring a vaudeville act. 



ANOTHER M LOOP M POP HOUSE. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

According to rumor the Orpheum 
Circuit interests which now operate the 
two large big time vaudeville theatres 
here have been negotiating to secure a 
"Loop" site for a popular priced vaude- 
ville theatre. 

It is said a portion of the plot was se- 
cured, but that there are several leases 
standing in the path of the remainder. 

The Rialto, the new Jones, Linick & 
Schaeffer pop vaudeville theatre open- 
ing here last week is the second pop 
house of the same firm's within the 
"Loop" area. The Rialto, although 
seating but 1,600 against McVicker's 
(the other) capacity of 2,300. beat the 
latter house in the money gross for the 
£rst week.- both. pJayinw to capacity ail 
the time'. " The management of The two 
houses do not yet understand how it 
could hanpen. 

If r«« don'* «dv«rtlM la VARIETY, 
Jon't odvortlM, 



MARRIAGES. 

Johnny Fink (Rose and Fink) and 
Ida Bass, non-professional, in Chicago. 

George Fisher, of vaudeville, and 
Helen B'lundidge, check girt' in the 
Hotel Edward grill, Kansas City, were 
married in that city late last week. 

Betty Lloyd and Fred Kullman, both 
of the "All Girl Revue." 

Francis Wilson, 63 years old, on the 
stage for 40 years, and Edna E. Burns, 
his leading lady in "The Bachelor's 
Baby," at St. Charles, Mo., the home of 
the bride. The comedian wrote the ac- 
count of the wedding for the news- 
papers himself in which he told of 
leaving the wedding ring in New York. 

Helen Claire Benedict in "That 
Other Woman" at the American, St. 
Louis, and" J. Luray Butler, her stage 
manager, last week. The bride is the 
daughter of Lew Benedict, of minstrel 
fame. 

Charles Crowl and Sylvia O. Eph- 
riam, at Aurora, 111., Tan. 21. Mr. Crowl 
is connected with the Chicago branch 
of the United Booking Offices. His 
wife retired from the stage three years 
ago. The marriage was made public in 
Chicago this week. 

Von Dell, protean magician, and 
Dorothy Arlin Carvell Lloyd (niece of 
the late Governor of Prince Edward 
Island), Jan. 2. 

Mort Schaeffer, western road mana- 

ger for the Leo Feist Co., and Claire 
ergman, of Minneapolis, Jan. 28. 
William Charles Meager, formerly of 
the Sullivan-Considine business forces, 
and Mary M. La Mont, at Seattle, 
Jan. 18. 



SICK AND INJURED. 

Ben Schaeffer fractured his left arm 
last week through a fall on the icy 
pavement at Nth street and 7th avenue. 
Schaeffer's arm was placed in splints 
at the emergency ward at St Vincent's 
Hospital. 

Johnnie Ford has just recovered 
from a serious attack of brain fever 
resulting from a slight case of pneu- 
monia. His illness kept him confined 
to his hotel for several days. 

Visitors at Ward's Island last Sun- 
day reported the condition of Joe Ray- 
mond as very serious. He is confined 
at the institution in ward 52 under his 
proper name, Raymond Entracht. Vis- 
itors can call daily. Raymond's mind 
has entirely left him and his physical 
condition is said to be very weak. 

One of the team of Howard and 
White, at Bayonne, N. J., last week, 
had an old knee trouble return, and 
was obliged to go to the Swiney Hospi- 
tal in that town, where he will remain 
six weeks or so, to recover. 

The Crisps have canceled the re- 
mainder of their vaudeville engage- 
ments for this season, due to the ill 
health of one of the Crisp girls. 

An automobile owned by George 
Choos tried to run up a tree on 110th 
street Tuesday night, injuring the 
three occupants, Mrs. Choos, Mr. 
Choos, Sr., and the chauffeur. They 
had to be taken to the hospital. The 
owner was not in the car at the time. 
The machine was brand new, it being 
its first day out. 

Dave Fitzgibbons, a pianist, and 
brother of Bert Fitzgibbons (in vaude- 
ville) was injured by an auto striking 
him at Eighth avenue and 40th street 
and removed to Bellevue Hospital. 
His wife is Belle Stuart. Some years 
ago the injured maif was pianist at 
Pastor's. 

George A. Ewell, formerly of the 
vaudeville team of Townsend and 
Ewell, is a jatient in the Paterson (N. 
J.) General Hosnital. 

Jessie Kennison was seriously in- 
jured in an automobile accident near 
Newark. N. J., late last week. She will 
be confined to her rooms in the New 
Victoria Hotel. "New ^ ork, for several 
weeks. 

The mother of Arthur Millus (Hen- 
ders and Millus) is in ill health and 
has been unable to get into communi- 
cation with her ion. 



VAUDEVILL 




NEW COAST BOOKING COMBINE 
IS CONNECTING LINK TO EAST 

Ackerman and Quigley in 'Frisco and Kelly and Barns of 

Seattle 'Arrange Affiliation. Nine Weeks of Small 

Town Stands in Circuit. "Coast Defenders" 

Thinning Out. 



San Francisco, Jan. 31. 

A vaudeville booking combination 
has been completed through an affilia- 
tion between Ackerman & Harris, 
(Frisco) and Kelly & Burns, Seattle. It 
is to be booked from here by Mrs. Ella 
Weston (who will also continue to book 
the local A. & H. houses), totaling nine 
weeks in all of one, two, three and 
four-night stands. The time closes in 
Devil's Lake, N. D. 

Through an agreement with the W. 
V. Mji. A. (Chicago) arrangements call 
for the Association to book direct into 
Chicago, former bookings in this ter- 
ritory going eastward were arranged in 
Chicago. 

The present programs consist of but 
three turns, the shows going aloaa\ in- 
tact. The town* included in the bo*k- 
inngs are Marysville, Chico, Red Bhm, 
Redding, Dunsmuire, Cal.; Roseburg, 
Eugene, Marshneld, Albany, Corvallis, 
Pendleton, Salem. Astoria, Ore.; Cen- 
tralia, Elema, Aberdeen, Hoqun, El- 
lensburg, N. Yakima, Topninsh! Walla 
Walla, Pullma, Burke, Wash.; Wallace, 
Kellogg, Courtelene, Idaho; Missoula, 
Havre, Great Falls, Mont.; Williston 
and Devil's Lake, N. D. 

When the circuit is firmly established 
and larger towns' added, it will prove 
an opportunity for the "coast defender." 
who heretofore never had the available 
bookings to work eastward. However, 
it is generally known the present short- 
age of coast material has been the cause 
for downtown theatres turning towards 
pictures. 

For a while it was impossible to book 
shows from the acts around town, while 
at one time a claim was made, hundreds 
could be picked up daily hanging around 
the familiar "Ham Tree" (professional- 
ly known) in front of the Pantages 
Theatre Bldg. 

Formerly there was considerable 
work in the near-by towns for "coast 
acts," although recently all of this has 
been done away with, with no signs 
of an outside bookings office, other than * 
Blake & Amber, being visible. The 
artists vanished, some joining picture 
companies, and others accepting offers 
v/ith musical stock throughout the 
middle west. Now it appears as 
though the offices find considerable 
trouble at times trying to fill here for 
what houses still remain. 



WHALEN GOING TO WORK. 

Boston, Jan. 31. 

Geoffrey Whalen, deputy organizer of 
the White Rats for New England, is 
apparently satisfied that he will have 
to go to work. 

It is known he has been making the 
rounds in the past few days seeking a 
position as "lecturer" in pop houses, 
nere. 

Whalen first achieved fame among 
the "home guards" of the local small 
time field when he blossomed forth as 
a descriptive lecturer furnishing the 
chatter, small talk, and sob stuff for 
feature films. Later he became one 
of Harry Mountfo'rd's nearest rivals as 
a talking agitator among White Rats 
in this section. 



BIRNES' SALARY CUT. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The White Rats have gone into the 

salary cutting thing they protest so 

much about, according to the story that 

Joe Birnes, the Chicago representative 



for the organization, is now receiving 
$20 weekly. 

Mr. Birnes was formerly paid $35 a 
week. 



MANAGERS MEET TUESDAY. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation will be held Tuesday in its Col- 
umbia Theatre building offices. 

A full attendance is expected as spe- 
cial notices of the meeting were sent 
out to all members. 



STAGE UNIONS ORGANIZE. 

Lynn, Mass., Jan. 31. 

The Electrical Trades Council, in- 
cluding musicians, stage workers, pic- 
ture operators, with a membership of 
apptoxtmaiely 600, to include Lynn, 
Salem, Swarapscott and Marblehead, 
and possibly Cliftondale and Nahant, 
has been organized in Lynn. William 
C. Scanlon, stage manager of the 
Strand, is the president, with Leo Bar- 
ber, vice president, and W. H. Ricker, 
secretary and treasurer. 

This organization embraces the Lynn 
Musicians' Association of the American 
Federation of Musicians; the State 
Employes' Union of the I. A. T. S. E., 
and Picture Operators of the M. P. II. 
O. of the United States and Canada. 
Permission for the local combination 
was granted by the general organiza- 
tions and by the American Federation 
of Labor, with which all are affiliated. 

The Lynn organization is the first 
and only one of its kind in New Eng- 
land, although there are several pro- 
jects on foot at the present time. Of 
the Lynn musicians involved there are 
about 475, about 75 stage hands and 
25 or 30 operators. 

EQUITY AWAITING NEWS. 

The Actors' Equity Association is 
now waitine for the next move the A. 
F. of L. v/ill make regarding the play- 
ers' organization. Francis Wilson, John 
Cope and Paul N. Turner appeared in 
Washington before the executive coun- 
cil and laid the case of the actors before 
the labormen. The latter said the Equity 
would be informed in due time as re- 
gards the decision of the A. F. of L. to 
whether a charter wouid be issue to the 
Eouity. 

Through an outside source, not con- 
nected with either the Equity or the 
labor body, it was intimated the A. F. 
of L did not care very much about wel- 
coming any other actors into the fold, 
through the recent White Rats' strike 
fiasco. 



ERNEST BALL RESIGNS. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 
Following^ the reported cancellation 
of his big time route last Friday, Er- 
nest R. Ball resigned as a member of 
the White Rats. 



COLONIAL'S RECORD. 

The Colonial, New York, is hanging 
up a record this week for number ol 
people attending the performances in 
that city. A "Mid-Winter Festival" 
was advertised and with a good show 
resulting from the extra-act program, 
the house commenced to break the at- 
tendance record Monday, although the 
monied gross could not be compared 
through the Colonial now charging but 
50 cents top at night 



NO CHICAGO AID. 

Chicago* J*n. 31. 
The signs for the past week have 
been the White Rats found they, could 
secure no aid from the Chicago unions. 
The local stage hands union, musicians' 
and operators' unions are said to have 

declared its members would not take 
part in any matter in which the Rats 
was concerned. 

Harry Mountford left for New York 
late last week, after his desperate ef- 
forts to interest the unions here had 
failed to accomplish anything tangible. 
The moral support the Rats expected 
through "peaceful picketing'' did not 
materialize. James W. FitzPatrick did 
not leave with Mountford, but is said 
to have continued interviewing the la- 
bor people. 

While Mountford was here he caused 
to be assiduously circulated reports of 
"something doing," making a continued 
story of it and having the serial cul- 
minate, after his departure, by word 
passing there would be a strike of Rats 
Monday, last Like all the other stories 
the Rats tent out, nothing came of it. 
If the object was to annoy managerial 
interests, that appeared to have failed as 
well. 

Mountford is reported to have made 
representaions to the local union people 
that were not proven to the union men's 
satisfaction. They are said to have 
grown lukewarm in their attitude to- 
ward the Rats organization upon find- 
ing that most of Mountford's talk to 
them had been talk, only. 

The feeling of the stage hands around 
here seeme d, t o be expressed through 
their statements that Charles C. Shay, 
president of the International Alliance 
Theatrical Stage Employs, is almost 
certain of re-election at the Cleveland 
convention Feb. 24 ol the A*. T. S. E. 
if he does not embroil his members In 
the White Rats agitation. 

The biggest blow to Mountford out 
this way has been his total failure to 
elicit sufficient sympathy to obtain any 
financial aid. 



CANT USE "KEITH VAUDEVILLE." 

Syracuse, N. Y., Jan. 31. 

Manager George Blumenthal of the 
Grand, which opened with vaudeville 
after being dark for a long time, was 
served with a court order which forbids 
him to use the advertising line. "For- 
merly the home of Keith Vaudeville." 

The Grand once played Keith vaude- 
ville. It was reopened by George 
Blumenthal, with a variety policy. At 
the opening performance Monday 
there was a turnaway. 

On the initial bill were a number of 
acts from the Dan Rice Circus, includ- 
ing James and Agnes Duvea, Lestro, 
Von Jerome, Reed and Wright, the 
Beat ties, Bertha Froelich, Maude Al- 
more and Co., the Five Castelucci and 
the Circus. 



MOSS' GEN. MGR. 

In something of a reorganization of 
the B. S. Moss executive offices through 
a retirement and a change or so in the 
forces, John C. Blockhouse is now gen- 
eral manaeer of the Moss Circuit. 

Mr. Blockhouse was formerly man- 
ager of Moss' Hamilton, where he is 
succeeded by C. W. Meyers. 



Wichita Falls on Interstate Circuit 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The Wichita theatre, Wichita Falls, 
Texas, has been added to the Interstate 
books and will be booked by Rav P. 
Whitfield from the Association floor. 
By tacking on Wichita Falls, it does 
away with the layoff between Fort 
Worth and Little Rock. 

Heretofore the Interstate acts clos- 
ing, an engagement at Fort Worth 
Wednesday would lay off xhr^e days 
and open in Little Rock Monday. 

The new bookings start Feb. 11, four 
acts for three days the last half of 
each week. 



NEW ACTS. 

Frederick H. Speare with Benedict 
MacQuarrie, Eveta Kundson and James 
Cherry in allegorical comedy playlet, 
"Evory women's Sister." 

Jane Ware (former leading woman 
with "Texas" on the International) in 
a dramatic sketch, "A Texas Tangle," 
with three people. 

Eugenie Blair in sketch by Alfred 
Grunberg, editorial staff of the "Amer- 
ican Magazine." 

Playlet, "Hotspur," Written by Rich- 
ard J. Beamish, editor of the Philadel- 
phia "Press" (Jos. Hart). 

Arthur Hartley (Hartley and Pecan) 
and Marjorie Hackett (Vogueland Fan- 
cies) two-act. 

Anthony Andre and Co. in "The 
Beggar-Man," sketch, with four people, 
produced by Walter H. Brown. 

Arria Hathaway and Jos. McShayne 
will add several novelty features to 
their present act, staged by Leon Errol. 

Revivals of "Dinkelspief's-Christmas" 
and "The Ladies' Beauty Parlor" (Joe 
Maxwell). 

John W. Ransome, returning to 
vaudeville in monolog (J. J. Arm- 
strong). 

Billy Clark (Armstrong and Clark) 
and Billy Smith (Ford and Smith), 
two-act. 

Jack Waldron (Lockett and Wal- 
dron) and Myrtle Young (Young and 
Brown), 'two-act 

An act of nine people, six saxophone 
players, two girls and one man, singers 
(Paul Durand). 

"Hello Frisco Girls," with Cora Rob- 
erts, including 10 girls and four princi- 
pals. 

Larry Reillv, Irish musical comedy 
with six people. ' 

Mary Balser and Co. in a comedy, 
with Chas. Harris. 

Dan Healy and Rene Chaplow (for- 
merly "World of Pleasure"), two-act. 

Dorothy Arthur and Paisley Noon, 
dancing and singing scenic production. 

Frank Evans (Evans and Vidocq) 
and Jack Lemley, blackface act. 

Jack McShane (Koberts and Mc- 
Shane) single. 

Sketch, with Corse and Claude Pay- 
ton and Edna Mae Spooner. 

"The Minstrel's Dream," with Al 
Grossman and six people, 

Julia and Ed. Redding, Alice Nelson 
and Co., sketch (Rose « Curtis). 

Burell Barbaretto and ViaatSv Fitz- 
Hugh. (Chamberlain Brow*k> 

Clark and ( Lewis, "In ffcndise" 
(Roehm & Richards). 

Three Chinese Musical Entertainers 
(Americans made up as Chinese). 

Richard Anderson, reviving "When 
Ceasar Sees Her." 

Mabel Elaine and a Jaz Band. 



MONTREAL'S BUILDINGS. 
Montreal, Jan. 31. 

The London theatre on St. Cather- 
ine street is being demolished to make 
room for a modern theatre which will 
seat 1,200 when completed and which 
will be known as the Holman theatre. 
It is being erected by the owners of the 
Grand theatre here. 

Work on the Loew theatre here has 
started and according to present plans 
the house will open next November. 
This house, seating 3,600, will be the 
largest theatre in Canada. 



Garrity at Audubon, New -York. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 
It is reported John J. Garrity, former- 
ly western representative for the Shu- 
berts and in personal charge of the 
Garrick, this city, has been appointed 
by William Fox manager of the Audu- 
bon theatre. New York. 



MANN BOOKED. 

Louis Mann in "Some Warriors" was 
placed for an. Orpfceum. Circuit en- 
gagement this week. He will open In 
Chicago, Feb. 12. 

If you don't utortlM in VARIETY, 
don't odv«rtiM. 



VARIETY 



AMONG THE WOMEN 



BY THE tKIKT. 



Eva Tanguay packed them in Mon- 
day afternoon at the Palace. Miss 
.Tatiguay has surely found the fountain 
of youth. Many "single women" have 
gone before but this indefatigable 
worker goes on. And each season 
Miss Tanguay's costume becomes more 
marvelous. Her first was made entire- 
ly of white plumes, head dress and all. 
It just oozed money. A burlesque on 
the modern hoop skirt was cleverly 
done. ' The hoop was in trellises of 
flowers over blue satin bloomers. Her 
red and green costume of last year was 
duplicated in purple and silver. A hard- 
shoe dance is done by Miss Tanguay in 
a mantle of silver sequins over a union 
suit of bronze. A dress that repre- 
sented a rose was wonderfully made. 
The trunks were of green While the 
rose curling upward was in pink and 
each leaf crusted in crystal. At the 
back were leaves and a stem reaching 
to the hair. Mignon in a white lace 
two flounce dress would do just as well 
if she didn't announce her imitations, 
but allow the audience to guess. Mme. 
Alf W. Loyal (Loyal's Dogs) wears a 
costume that is funny, although it is 
not meant for comedy. Her white 
stockinged limbs are encased in short 
white trousers. A tight fitting three- 
quarter coat is worn over all, making 
her look top heavy. The women of the 
four Marks Brothers' act are dressing 
better than formerly. Especially good 
looking was a white dancing frock 
trimmed in black birds. Emilly Ann 
Wellman is fortunate in her playlet for 
vaudeville. Miss Wellman was first in 
a good looking neglige of lace. A 
change was made to an evening dress 
of white made with an over drapery. In 
the same sketch Winifred Burke was 
stunning in a robe of steel. Mile. Tal- 
ma (with LeRoy and Bosco) wore blue 
tulle encrusted in sequins.^ 

Billy Watson's"~"Beef Trust" has 
nothing on the Rose Sydell show at the 
Columbia this week. The Watson's 
chorus are more shapely than the Sydell 
organization's. A better dressed chorus 
hasn't been seen at the Columbia this 
season. Miss, Sydell appears for one 
number wearing a pink net dress em- 
broidered in crystal. A quick change 
•s made to a tight fitting dress of pale 
blue sequins with bands of orange vel- 
vet. Many handsome diamond pieces 
were also worn by Miss Sydell. The 
show lacks women. It would help the 
show were Miss Sydell to do more. 

Kate Pullman, a lively miss and a 
good dancer, keeps things humming 
when she is on the stage. 

Miss Pullman wore several frocks, 
the prettiest of which was the purple 
velvet trimmed with white fur and a 
white made in narrow flounces. 

Frances Cornell for a specialty num- 
ber wore a bright red net made in 
points and a sequin bodice. Another 
Rood looking costume was of black 
and silver sequins in stripes made* 
princess. 

From the applause received by the 
Gliding O'Mearas their whole dancing 
class must have followed them over to 
the American theatre, the first half. 
Mrs. O'Meara's first dress was of net 
flounces bonded in blue moire silk. The 
second dress was pale blue silk, having 
a silver figure. The skirt was the barrel 
effect, while the silver bodice came to a 
long point. Harrington and Lanster 
are two good looking girls. Dressed 
alike in coral velvet coats trimmed in 
lambs fur, changes are made to a ballet 
dress of several shades of net and a 
white taffeta made with a ruffled panel 
and angel sleeves. The finale is in Hula 
costume. Polly Prim nleased with some 
smart material. An eccentric white 
satin costume is first worn by her, she 
ch&sizir.p to a wedding dress, titosi mili- 
tary in fines. A two-flounce silver dress 
had side panels of plain silver. The 
woman of the Frank Whittier Co. wore 
purple net made long waisted and 



trimmed with ciarabcau. A mauve vel- 
vet coat is also shown. Blanche Vin- 
cent (Mack and Vincent) wore the in- 
evitable two-flounce silver lace dress. 

The courtesy of the Palace staff 
should be made into a picture film, if 
that is possible, and exhibited in all 
other theatres for the education of em- 
ployes. The Palace people make their 
attention so unobstrusive it must be a 
pleasure for every Palace patron who 
visits that iiouse. It may be a coinci- 
dence although I think not for those 
things usually go together that the 
biggest and best vaudeville theatre 
should have the management if does. 
Generally the smaller the house the 
more important its employes are or 
think they are. Most of the theatres I 
have visited when extending the pass 
privilege make it apparent they are do- 
ing you a favor. At the Palace it's the 
reverse. They leave you with the im- 
pression you are doing them a favor. 

Adelaide and Huehes (at the Or- 
pheunO are doing their most preten- 
tious act These two dancers do a 
little of all the dances from the minuet 
to the modern. Adelaide wears a 
shepardess dress of rose silk puffed 
over a skirt of many ruffles. A poke 
bonnet had plumes to match. An al- 
legorical ballet was cleverly done. 
Elsie Faye and Paul 'McCarthy do a 
neat act. Miss Faye wore a blue net 
made with three flounces, each piped 
with baby ribbon. The bodice was 
crystal. A long pelticoat would im- 
prove this dress. Erne Weston (with 
Donald Kerr) wears an orchid taffeta 
cut very short and in points. A sec- 
ond change is to a green net made in 
four layers with a flowered bodice. Mr. 
Kerr is wrong' with his checked trou- 
sers, chocolate brown cutaway coat and 
tan yest. 

In her latest Vitagraph release, "In- 
discretion," Lilliam walker reveals 
considerably more of her physical 
charms than her usual fascinating dim- 
ples. In the opening scenes she is in 
a one-piece bathing suit, known in 
France as a "myo" (I'm not sure the 
spelling is correct, but you know what 
I mean). And Lillian has some figure. 
The visualization is as alluring as any- 
thing perpetrated by the daring Audrey 
Munson in her various nude reveaf- 
ments. Later on in the picture Miss 
Walker wears a most unbecoming eve- 
ning grown. Of the two, it is safe to 
say most picture fans prefer the "myo." 



"MJTTUtFLY" ON THE RECORDS. 

"Poor Butterfly" (vocal) has been 
issued on the phonograph records, and 
it is estimated the sale will reach 400,- 
000 or more. On the reverse of "But- 
terfly" (Victor) is Irving Berlin's 
"Alice in Wonderland," as sung in 'The 
Century Girl." The two songs draw an 
equal royalty from the record people. 

The "Butterfly" number (instrumen- 
tal) had previously been issued by the 
piano-player concerns. 

It's reported that T. B. Harms & 
Co. & Francis, Day & Hunter, pub- 
lishers of the "Butterfly" music, has 
secured permission from Charles Dil- 
lingham, manager of "The Big Show" 
at the Hippodrome *( where the number 
is of the score) to release the song 
(vocat) for limited use among profes- 
sional singers, the release permission, 
according to accounts, carrying certain 
restrictions the music publishing firm is 
obligated to observe. 

That "Poor Butterfly," written by 
Raymond Hubbell (music) and John L. 
Golden (lyrics) is the reigning popular 
song hit of this season thus far is more 
from accident than expectation. Dur- 
ing the rehearsal of the Hippodrome 
production, the producers of that show 
attemptel to replace the song, not car- 
ing for it through the tempo. Several 
song writers were invited to the re- 
hearsals to listen to it in the hope they v 
would furnish a satisfactory substitute. 
None was gotten, however, before the 
premiere and the song was in the first 
night performance, remaining in the 
show since, although its popularity was 
brought about more through the instru- 
mental version of the number, as a fox 
trot dance, than the vocalized song at 
the Hip. 

DULUTH OUT. 

The Lyceum, Duluth, will be dropped 
from the American wheel after next 
week (Feb. 5). The burlesque shows 
have played three days in the town un- 
der a guarantee. 

The house will play only legit road 
shows in the future. 



Memphis' First Loew Show. 

The opening Loew program for the 
Lyceum, Memphis, Feb. 12, has Ed. and 
Jack Smith, "Man in the Dark;" Tom 
Kelly, Gleesons and O'Houlihan and 
Carlyle Blackwell in "A Square Deal" 
(film) with one act to fill. 

The following week "The Mimic 
World" and three other acts will be 
given. 

Memphis shows go intact on the 
Loew time after their stand at Atlanta. 



If 



te't atortlM la VARIETY, 
dap't WrortlM. 




DARCY SHOW RECEIPTS. 

Buffalo, Jan. 31. 

Les Darcy is appearing here at the 
Garden, which plays stock burlesque, 
and will remain for the week. Last 
week he was in Pittsburgh at the Acad- 
emy which also has a stock burlesque* 
policy. His arrangement called for 56 
per cent, of the .gross, and since the 
takings were slightly in excess of $5,- 
000, the tour managers were able for 
the first time since the trip started tc 
pay Darcy his salary of $2,500 all in 
a lump. 

So far the Darcy road show venture 
has proven a disastrous one financially, 
not only for Freeman Bernstein, but 
for Ben Rosenthal, who "wished" him- 
self in for a complete bankroll. The 
first stand at Bridgeport drew a fairly 
big house with $800 taken in, but in 
Irenton the following day the pick- 
ings amounted to just $60. The gross 
jumped four dollars in Reading and 
then leaped again in Baltimore, when 
$66 came through the ticket window. 
Allentown made Freeman sit up and 
take notice with a gross of $450, and he 
had visions of wealth in Philadelphia 
the following day, but just $127 came 
to view. 

That was the day when Darcy'a first 
week s salary was due and it was fig- 
ured out that there was $1,000 coming 
to the Australian, the balance having 
already been delivered. Right there 
Rosenthal landed himself as a partner 
by digging $1,500 and the day was 
saved. 

The troupe then traveled to Easton, 
*\ l & b lV four * ct9 - ,eft » n <I gathered 
* VV «- T en came A,t °ona with $175 
22«V oI ! n £ tow . n ' wh ere the receipts were 
$210. That brought them into Pitta- 
burgh, but only one act was left (Stone, 
a barrel jumper). 

Just why Bernstein hangs opto hit 
fliv tour is a bit of a mystery, but re- 
ports have it that there is a clause in 
Darcy'a contract calling for Freeman's 
interest in "all attractions" for 15 
weeks and therefore when Darcy fights 
McCoy, Bernstein will have to be de- 
clared in if he is able to continue the 
tour and pay the boxer the weekly sal- 
ary up until two weeks before the mill 

In addition to their regular troubles, 
someone with the troupe is said to have 
left a trail of checks behind, these go- 
ing for board' bills and the like. There 
were seven or eight advance men, but 
where they arc now, no one knows. 

_ ^ Chicago, Jan. 31. 

Les Darcy, the Australian pugilist, 
makes his first Chicago appearance at 
the Haymarket (west side) next Sun- 
day, where he will play a week's en- 
gagement as an "extra feature." 

MAX COOPER AND IRENE RICARDO. 

On the cover are Max Cooper and 
Irene Ricardo, a feature at the Alham- 
bra this week. The act is taking the 
comedy honors of the bill, thanks to 
the amusing antics of Miss Ricardo, 
one of the cleverest eccentric come- 
diennes in the two-a-day. 

"Ah, Give Me the Ring" is the title 
of their skit, written by Joe Young and 
Sam Lewis, which furnishes the frame- 
work upon which the pair build their 
amusing nonsense. 

One of the many novelties introduced 
by this clever pair is a freak musical 
duet for which Miss Ricardo plays a 
ukelele, while Mr. Cooper works out 
odd harmony by means of a toy cornet. 
This bit was one of the hits of their 
offering at the Alhambra. 

The turn is splendidly mounted and 
smartly dressed and as a clean specialty 
lends cjass to any vaudeville bill. Mr. 
Cooper's fine baritone voice is heard to 
good effect in "The Black Sheep" ballad 
from the list of Waterson, Berlin & 
Snyder. Direction of Claude & Gordon 
Bostock. 



JAY 



GOULD and FLO LEW fS 
"HOLDING THE FORT' 



This is tbt way we play the Loew and Fox Circuits. Snow, rain, baggagemen and subways 

neT .^ b i ther J ttl - ™° w wouW yo ° like to *™«1 this way? We soon leave for the Coast. Car 
at 1666 Broadway. 



K. C.'s Musical Stock. 

Kansas City, Jan. "31." 

The Opera Players at the Grand 

opened this week with "The Firefly" 

as the first of a musical series. The 

company came here from St. Louis. 



8 



VARIETY 



Woodmanstcn Inn opened its new 
ice skating rink last night (Thursday). 

The Cliff House, San Francisco, re- 
cently celebrated its 50th anniversary. 

Ice skating may be a feature on the 
boardwalk at Asbury Park this sum- 
mer. It will be in a rink. 

A revue with six principles and eight 
girls is being prepared by Al Herman 
for Au Caprice. 

Joe Termini will direct the 15-piece 
orchestra at the Auto Show in Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Harry Cornell will produce a revue 
for the Cafe Boulevard. It is being 
staged by Leon De Costa. 

Irene Steinfeld has joined Eddie 
Clark's revue at the States' Restaurant, 
Chicago. 

Queenie Queenen left the Al Jolson 
show last week and is now the hostess 
•t the Grand Pacific, Chicago. She is a 
Chicago girl. 

A sign posted on the elevator door 
leading to the former Bull Ring states 
the resort will be opened again in about 
ten days. 

Gil Boag has taken over the Doech 
and Doris and will reopen the estab- 
lishment shortly, calling it the Moulin 
Rouge. 

Flo Ziegfeld, Jr., announces he has 
placed Claudius and Scarlet, now in 
"The Midnight Frolic," on the Amster- 
dam Roof, under contract for one year. 

The Dixie Jass Band, five pieces, is 
at Reisenweber's (Hawkesworth Room) 
brought on by Max Hart. The band 
opened last Friday. It is said to have 
come from New Orleans. 



CABARE.TS 



Veronica, a "cooch" dancer, who 
opened as a Hula stepper at Rector's 
one time and made it so strong she 
left after the first performance, has 
been engaged for the Cocoanut Grove 
on the Century Roof. 

"There It Egypt in Your Dreamy 

Eyes" (Remick & Co.) is being pro- 
nounced the most popular fox trot 
music in the restaurants just at present, 
even supplanting "Poor Butterfly" as 
an encore getter. 



A strike of waiters and bartenders at 
the Hotel Bismarck and Bismarck Gar- 
dens, Chicago, is on. The strikers are 
union and the musicians working in the 
same places may be called upon to go 
cut in sympathy. 

Doraldina, the dancer, has been sued 
by Clifford C. Fischer for $10,500, 
Fischer alleging a monied interest in 
her present contract as her manager, 
per agreement held by him. Charles 
H. Griffith represents Mr. Fischer in 
the action. 



Cincinnati business and society men 
formed the Queen City Ice Rink Com- 
pany incorporated Jan. 27. Capitaliza- 
tion, $125,000. The rink will be lOOx 
200. Incorporators are Templeton 
Hriggs, William E. Minor, J. B. Hol- 
lister, R. F. Ives, F. H. Chatfield. 

The one o'clock law in the Chicago 
cafes is rigidly enforced. Almost all 
lights are turned off at that hour 
whether patrons have paid their checks 
or not. As yet only a few kicks have 
been registered, although one New 
Yorker caught a short-changing waiter 
in the act. 



dozen crack shots who are rushed 
around town in a high powered car im- 
mediately upon report of a "job." 

A clerical campaign endeavoring to 
close the tenderloin district of San 
Francisco and enforce the two o'clock 
liquor law has been started, and prom- 
ises to cause considerable trouble 
throughout the city. A number of 
familiar faces have departed from 
many cafes, while a score of $irl enter- 
tainers have refused to continue until 
everything is settled, having gone north 
to locate in cafes in the meantime. 



Hector J. Streychmans, who is hand- 
ling the publicity for the Bismarck 
Gardens, Chicago, put over a nifty Mon- 
day when he had the auto-driving dog, 
"Poughkeepsie Rex," drive a car 
through the Chicago streets, with a 
banner on each side of the car, carry- 
ing the words, "Bismarck Gardens 
Every Evening." The dog stunt hit the 
first pages of the dailies. The dog ap- 
pears to be guiding the car as his fore- 
feet are on the steering wheel. The 
car is run by a wire attached to the 
shoes of the man seated beside the ani- 
mal. 

The Jazz Band has hit New York at 
last, but just how popular it will be- 
come here is a matter that is going to 
be entirely in the hands of certain au- 
thorities that look after the public wel- 
fare. There is one thing that is cer- 
tain and that is that the melodies as 
played by the Jazz organization at 
Reisenweber's are quite conducive to 
make the dancers on the floor loosen 
up and go the limit in their stepping. 
Last Saturday night the Jazz musicians 
furnished the bigger part of the music 
for dancing at the 400 Club and the 
rather "mixed" crowd that was present 
seemed to like it, judging from the en- 
cores that were demanded and from the 
manner in which the dancers roughen- 
ed-up their stepping. The band carries 
its strongest punches in the trombone 
and the piccolo, the latter hitting all the 
blues. 

Tom Shanley, manager of Shanley's, 
gave a novel performance at his cab- 
aret last week when he staged the Van 
Cleve and "Pete" (mule) act at the 8 
o'clock show to test its possibilities as 
an attraction. There were grave fears 
held out for the mule's behavior, but 
nothing unexpected happened through- 
out the specialty, the mule managing to 
do its entire routine of stunts on the 
limited space provided and without any 
display of nervousness because of the 
exceptional closeness of the hot meat, 
etc. The act will probably appear at 
Shanley's for a run after playing some 
local engagements previously booked. 
This is the first time an animal act (ex- 
cepting an incidental dog or so in a 
turn) has been engaged or even shown 
in a restaurant in the east, although 
during the cabaret craze in San Fran- 
cisco a few years back such acts were 
not uncommon. 



The hold-up of the Morrison hotel 
lunch rootn last week bv a two-gunned 
I'V.tuVit vvjjr) o.'.uy . took. .S-10. ,?.uM nji:>se»'j 
a $200 roil, was only one of 42/ rob- 
beries and "stick-ups" in Chicago for 
the week. The police have formed a 
rifle guard, which consists of half a 



The Isleworth Hotel, Atlantic City, 
has an ice rink in its grille with Bas- 
sett and Helaine as the professionals. 
The public is allowed to skats and the 
entertainment appears to be the on- 
lookers watching the beginners. The 
Isleworth grille is running sort a la 
caie only, as the restaurant of the hotel 
does not serve between the American 
plan meals. This hasn't helped the 
business apparently and the A. C. visi- 
ters haven't enthused over the Isle- 
worth's innovation. The Atlantic ho- 
tel now giving particular attention (and 
:»! h ■' nVie) '.'.to proie^iooaJs is the St. 
Charles, which has as its manager the 
same Murphy formerly at the Alarr.ac 
(he having followed Jim Walsh into 
the renamed Young's Hotel). Dunlap's 



down there is giving five acts for a 
cabaret. 

The "Revue of Varieties" at Rector's 
is a dressy show, with five principals, 
12 choristers ana three specialties. It 
was first shown Jan. 2$, staged by 
Andre, with some special music and 
lyrics by Dave Oppenheim, Tack Yel- 
len and Herman Paley. Muriel Window 
is featured among the revue principals. 
A restaurant floor is new to Miss Win- 
dow, but she gets around in lively 
fashion, is always costumed becoming- 
ly and leads several numbers, besides 
giving her "cave man" song with cos- 
tume from vaudeville, that is too much 
of a lyric song for a restaurant. In 
Patsy Delany (held over from the for- 
mer revUe) and Gloria Foy, Rector's 
has two high kicking number leaders 
and they add pep to the performance. 
Mildred Valmore has ope bit that hard- 
ly counts. Stuart Jackson and Harri- 
son Garrett are the men, Jackson a 
conventional juvenile for number lead- 
ing, with Garrett inconspicuous. For 
the number of principals there doesn't 
seem to be sufficient snap to the revue. 
Perhaps this is through a couple of 
the songs having been ordered out be- 
fore the premiere by reason of the 
U. S. Supreme Court copyright deci- 
sion, the productions restricting the 
songs refusing permission for the num- 
bers to be sung. The opening number 
is a changeable affair from "The Girls 
of 76" to the "1917 Girl from Rec- 
tor's," with the chorus girls making 
x two or three changes during the bit, 
they appearing but for an instant in the 
opening costumes. The closing num- 
ber, to an old "Patrol" melody, had a 
neat dressing scheme, a hybrid of 
tights, union suits and waists. The 
girls are military dolls and the num- 
ber is called "From Broadway to the 
Trenches." "Honolulu Way" did about 
the best of the songs, with Miss Win- 
dow and Mr. Jackson leading. Miss 
Window's first number was "Dixie All 
the Time," with the girls behind her, 
Miss Window wearing her black raven 
crest in this and throughout the per- 
formance. Dore and Cavanaugh, who 
have grown very popular at Rector's 
and are one of the few remaining teams 
of professional dancers, did well in 
their specialty and the Gaudsmidts, 
with their dogs, also performed. The 
other act was the Friedowsky Troupe, 
Russian dancers, with their fast work. 
The present Rector revue, running 
somewhat over 45 minutes without an 
intermission, is much preferable to the 
former show there (that had a concert 
soprano singing a hula number). This 
new revue will grow even better after 
it has been playing a while. For Miss 
Delany's benefit it might be said she 
has developed a habit of favoring the 
south side of the room while working. 
She and all others on in a cabaret show 
had better circulate when on the floor 
and keep circulating. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The Andre-Sherri revue, headed by 
Mabel Hamilton, Ethel Kirk, Gardener 
Trio, and the Glorias, long at Rector's, 
New York, invaded the Chicago "Loop" 
cabaret interior Monday night at the 
Winter Garden and captured it in a 
manner that may keep the revue here 
indefinitely. Mons. Andre was present 
and wielded the baton for the first per- 
formance. The Winter Garden was 
packed and the revue was accepted as 
just what the Loop needed. New faces 
and new numbers, done in approved 
New York style, with both the individual 
and ensemble numbers performed in 
15 roadway dash and ginger, had the 
".GairdfVtr rr/.nva •bellowing.' enthusiastic ' 
appreciation. It's the best show of its 
kind in the Loop. Mabel Hamilton and 
Ethel Kirk vied with each other in dis- 
playing some of the niftiest creations 



of the modiste's art yet seen in a Chi- 
cago cabaret Miss Hamilton worked 
hard and left an agreeable impression 
in her number leading. Miss Kirk 
wore some stunning gowns that had 
that Monday night crowd gaping. The 
dancing ability of the Gardener Trio 
and the Glorias was given every chance 
to shine and their clever work was re- 
ceived with much acclaim. Some novel 
numbers are introduced by these 
dancers'. The costuming of the revue 
numbers— especially the military finale 
— was noteworthy. While the show 
got over with a bang and will draw 
in business — the Garden setting is not 
the best imaginable for a revue of this 
type. The acoustics are bad, the low 
ceiling of the basement and the thick 
pillars throughout making it hard for 
the table-audience to hear and from one 
side of the garden it is impossible to 
see the stage at all. A big word of praise 
is due F. Wheeler Wadsworth, orches- 
tra director, who is not only an Al mu- 
sician, but is a willing worker. Wads- 
worth, a corking good saxaphonist by 
the way, also furnishes the "jass music" 
for the public dancing. The Garden 
can afford to play a revue of the Andre- 
Sherri type, yet its manangemet must 
make some changes in its stage layout 
before the best results can be secured. 
That is what the Garden is evidently 
aiming for, but the hand of a showman 
is missing. Andre worked like a Tro- 
jan to make the opening a hit, and he 
succeeded splendidly, considering the 
very small stage and ihe crowded con- 
dition in which his revue company 
worked. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The Bismarck Gardens is out of "the 
Loop" but there are few prettier places 
in restaurants than the beautifully il- 
luminated and handsomely decorated 
Marigold Room of the Bismarck. It 
has a small stage but the numbers are 
all nicely staged on the big dancing 
floor. Not only is the show regarded 
as about the biggest and best of its 
kind but the double orchestra is proving 
popular. Between Biese's Jass band 
and Foote's orchestra, the music is 
splendidly taken care of. A small ad- 
mission fee is charged and the place 
now has become the Mecca of revue de- 
votees. Edward Beck staged the shows. 
He is giving 'em a corking good revue. 
Each number strikes that happy musical 
production medium that keeps the show 
running with smoothness and precision. 
Ada Foreman is the danseuse«clas- 
sique. She is the little dancing sprite 
with Ruth St. Denis. -Her Oriental 
and Javanese dances are creating a fur- 
ore at the Gardens. The revue man- 
agement has retained the Loos Broth- 
ers, who not only whoop things up with 
topical numbers, but have several pro- 
duction numbers in which they snow 
surprising ability. In the big Egyptian 
number Ernie Loos leads "There's 
Egypt in Your Dreaming Eyes," which 
Beck has made popular in Chicago 
since putting it on elaborately at the 
Gardens. Especially meritorious is the 
specialty dancing of A. Patton Gibbs 
and (Miss) Joy Gardner. They have 
a pleasing "ice skating dance" and do 
well on their straight routine but the 
piece de resistance of their revue work 
is the Apache dance. Grace Humphrey 
appears in Hawaiian dances and is con- 
sidered a "find" for the revue. Carrie 
Foppiano is the soprano and a good 
one. Frank Mack and Frances Runkle 
appear in society dances and are be- 
coming favorites. Among the num- 
bers are: "You're the Girl" (Milton E. 
Schwarzwald), the Charles Purcell song 
from "Flora Belle," "My Fox Trot Girl" 
( Paul Biese) and the latest composi- 
tions by Fleta Jan Brown and Herbert 
Spencer. From 21 to 17 numbers are 
offered during the revue, with a min- 
strel idea at one time giving the sing- 
ers a medley. Eight girls in the ensem- 
bles and a comely, peppery bunch they 
'are. The cosmmts . were ali specially 
made for the show. It looks as though 
Mr. Beck, with this restaurant show, 
has given Chicago something to talk 
about. 



VARIETY 



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Vol. XLV. 



No. 10 



Imitator*, in and out of vaudeville, 
are confronted with a complex condi- 
tion, owing to the decision of the U. S. 
Supreme Court, restricting copyrighted 
music and songs or both absolutely 
within the province of the owner of the 
copyright With what regret must the 
imitator, more often the imitatress, ap- 

Ereciate that no longer can "an act" 
e composed of the most melodious 6r 
popular "restricted" songs for presenta- 
tion as "impressions" of those creating 
the numbers in the original productions 
or acts. That is, of course, if the cruel- 
hearted producing manager, act owner 
or publisher refuses to lend his con- 
sent to the nervy imitator's never-paid- 
for-act In times past the imitator 
blithely represented that merely the 
"impression" was being given, the song 
was incidental, and invited the owner 
of the number to go into court, under- 
standing all too perfectly court pro- 
ceedings would mean publicity equiva- 
lent to the loss of one number. For an 
imitator, if the secret must be let 
loose, seldom imitates but one person 
or uses only songs from one produc- 
tion, for that very obvious reason 
just mentioned. No longer now is it 
thought a matter of publicity, injunction 
or court proceedings. For if there are 
court proceedings they are apt to be 
of a harsh trend, and if the imitator is 
told not to, it's not, not perhaps. And 
now we shall see what we shall see, 
most interesting of which will be to 
count up the survivors of the acts that 
never had an act but got over with an 
act made up of other acts. In all 
vaudeville there has been nothing quite 
so brazen as the imitator or "impres- 
sionist" Excluding the bare two, per- 
haps three, legitimately entitled to the 
artistic appellation of impersonator 
(alias imitator) there has never been 
one "imitator" really qualified to pre- 
sent "impressions" before an audience, 
but many have, in vaudeville, and many 
have tried in productions, only to re- 
turn to vaudeville, excepting those 
qualified who remained with produc- 
tions. 

Mrs. Reed Albee has gone to Palm 
Beach, Fla., for two months. 

The Allston theatre, Allston, Mass., 
has been added to the Marcus Loew 
books (Boston). 

The new Pantages theatres at Seattle 
and Vancouver are expected to open 
by March 1. 

Walter Weems has returned from 
Australia and will work east over the 
Orpheum opening in Oakland, Feb. 18. 

Louise Edwards (Edwards and 
Louise), who underwent an operation 
recently, is recovered. 

Abe Silver, of the Broadway Music 
Corporatoin, is in Lakewood, N. J., on 
a short vacation. 



Edward Lewis, assistant manager ?.+ 
Procter's- Fifth Avenue, leaves there 
Saturday. 

The W. H. Straus act, "At the Stage 
Door," has been taken over by Henry 
Chesterfield. 



Mae Latham, prima donna with 
"Merry Rounders," has left the Colum- 
bia wheel show to do pictures. 

Seats for "The Man Who Came 
Back" at the Playhouse are on sale as 
far ahead as the special Decoration 
Day matinee. 

"The Love Mill," operatic, produced 
by Andreas Dippel, will open Feb. 5 in 
Allentown, Pa. It will play Boston be- 
fore being brought to New York. 

Mort Singer and C. E. Kohl, execu- 
tive heads of the Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association, afrived in New 
York for a three-day visit this week. 

. The Grand opera house block, Pitts- 
burgh, formerly playing the big time 
vaudeville bills (now at the Davis) 
suffered a bad fire Sunday. 

C. Brady, for several years assistant 
treasurer of the Orpheum, Montreal, 
Can., has been appointed ^treasurer of 
the Francais, in that city. 

Chas. Williams, resident manager of 
the Temple, Detroit, is visiting New 
York this week for the first time in 
ten years. 



'The Lodger" at the Bandbox has 
been extended from Feb. 3 for an addi- 
tional week, when it goes to Boston, 
opening there Feb. 12. 

Lydia Barry opens on the Orpheum 
Circuit in Duluth Feb. 11. Two weeks 
later the Barry Girls open in the same 
town. 



Richy T. Craig has placed in re- 
hearsal "The Merry Burlesquers," a 
one-night stand burlesque show. The 
company will open about Feb. 15. 

Aaron Jones, of Jones, Linick & 
Schaefer, who has been in town for 
a week, returned to Chicago Tuesday. 
He devoted most of his visit here look- 
ing after his large film interests. 

Dorothy Bailey and Marie Weirman. 
of the Al Jolson show, were operated 
upon for appendicitis within a week of 
each other. Both are reported on the 
way to recovery. 

C. J. Brunne has placed in rehearsal 
"The Love Thief," an English dramatic 
piece, which opens Feb. 19 at the Lin- 
coln, Union Hill. Oily Logsdon re- 
cruited the American company. * 

Elsie DeWolfe. who Rave her illus- 
trated war lecture at the Elliott last 
Sunday to a capacity audience, is to re- 
peat the performance in Chicago, Bos- 
ton and Philadelphia. 



Sig Bosley resigned as Chicago man- 
ager of the Shapiro-Bernstein Music 
firm this week, being replaced by Joe 
Bennett, formerly an assistant in the 
same office. 

William McKaye has succeeded 
Charles Porter as dramatic editor of the 
Chicago "Examiner," Mr. Porter be- 
ing shifted over to the staff of the Sun- 
day edition. 

Charles Cutler, the "wrestler," has 
quit the mat game and is now training 
wealthy Chicagoians as athletic direc- 
tor of the Mystic Athletic Club, an off- 
shoot of the Shrine. 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. MacDonald 

(Charles and Sadie MacDonald) will 
celebrate their silver wedding in their 
Boston home, 38 Bowdoin street, 
Feb. 2. 

'Mark Monroe is wandering around 
the neighborhood with a Stetson style 
sombrero that the bunch claims cost 
him $15, but Mark won't confess what 
he paid, although the hat is not to be 
confused with a Monroe $15 suit. 



Charles Van (Charles and Fannie 
Van) has placed his former comedy 
acts with Max Hart (Palace theatre 
building) to be disposed of, as Mr. Van 
does not expect to return to the stage 
at present. 

Jere Cohan will preside at the regu- 
lar monthly meeting, Feb. 6, of the 
Catholic Actors' Guild of America at 
the Hotel Astor. An entertainment in 
which prominent players will take part 
will be an incident of the meeting. 

The plot of ground adjoining the 
Palace, on the southeast corner of 
Seventh avenue and 47th street, was 
sold at an executors' sale Tuesday by 
Joseph P. Day for $450,000, to Sol 
Bloom.- The property was part of the 
estate of the late Peter De Lacy. 

A traveling indoor circus will be 
started by Jules Larvett Feb. 15 at 
Shenadoah, Pa., playing one-night 
stands with the opening dates so far 
secured guaranteed. One dollar top 
will be the scale. About six circus acts 
(doubling) are to be carried. 



E. L. Perry has been appointed resi- 
dent manager of the Riverside theatre, 
the new uptown house recently taken 
over by the Keith interests. Mr. Perry 
has been a Keith representative for a 
number of years and was most recently 
at the Orpheum, Montreal. 



The final division of the estate of 
Max Anderson was made Tuesday and 
all moneys paid over to the respective 
heirs. Anderson's brother, who had in- 
tended contesting the will, has been 
settled with, the bulk of the estate go- 
ing to his sister, Mrs. Bleyer. 

Conn & Wildrow, Inc., who operate 
the theatre at Haverstraw, N. Y., have 
taken over a house in Suffern and will 
operate it with vaudeville, booked by 
Fally Marcus, opening Feb. 12. The 
same firm is negotiating for several 
other towns in Central New York. 

The action of Howard Jones against 
Weber's theatre for an accounting of 
the receipts of his piece, "The London 
Follies," which played but one day at 
that house in 1911, was settled last 
week. The case was in litigation for 
six years. The piece was taken off 
after its first performance. 

The East-West Players, which gave 
four performances recently at the Gar- 
den theatre, are being backed by the 
Educational Alliance. Negotiations 
were under way for the securing of the 
Bandbox by the Alliance, but they fell 
through when "The Lodger" was 
moved to that house. 



Frank Reynolds, the stage door man 
at the Palace theatre, is constantly an- 
swering inquiries as to the whereabouts 
of Mrs. Vernon Castle since the be- 
ginning of the "Patria" film engage- 
ment at that house. The first week 
over a hundred people journeyed to 
the stage door insisting upon seeing the 
dancer herself. 

Four members of "The Other Wom- 
an" were injured in an automobile ac- 
cident in Kansas City last week. Clay 
T. Vance, manager of the company, 
was cut by glass from the broken 
windshield; Vaxa Belle suffered slight 
injuries; J. Lovay Butler and Helen 
Claire Benedict were attended by a 
physician for shock. 

Walter J. Naylor, manager of the 
stock at the Lyceum, New Britain, 

Conn., denies the members, of his com- 
i/any did not re*. rive their salaries for 
the week ending Jan. 20. Ernest Lynds, 
who was a member of the company, 
claimed a portion of his salary wgs not 
forthcoming on that date and he re- 
turned to New York. 



Ethel Robinson, of the Robinson 
Amusement Co., has the contracts for 
the outdoor attractions for the North- 
western Circuit of Exhibitions for the 
10th consecutive year. The circuit em- 
braces Moose Jaw, Calgary, Red Deer, 
Edmonton, Brandon, Regina, Saska- 
toon, North Battleford, Prince Albert, 
Yorkton and Weyburn. 

At the regular meeting of Theatrical 
Protective Union No. 1 the following 
delegates, H. L. Abbot, Wm. Bass, T. 
F. Burke, J. F. Corrigan, W. S. Davis, 
S. Driscoll, James Maxwell, Sr., J. M. 
Meeker, VV. E. Monroe, J. W. McDow- 
ell, T. J. McKenna and J. Tierney were 
elected to represent the local at the 
coming convention of the I. A. T. S. E. 
in Cleveland week Feb. 25. 

The Lyceum and Palace, Amsterdam, 
N. Y., have been sold by Sol Bernstein 
to Manager Klapp, having the picture 
houses in that town. The Palace is un- 
der construction and will play pop 
vaudeville when finished, which the 
Lyceum is now doing, all vaudeville 
bookings through Bill Delaney of the 
United Booking Offices. The sale oc- 
curred last Friday and the new owner 
took possession Monday. 



The Grand Mancini Opera Co. played 
at the Tampa (Fla.) Baby Casino for 
one performance this week, offering "II 
Trovatore" to an audience of 200. The 
management of the house advised one 
of the cpera company's members that 
business could not be expected better 
as the "house was but recently remod- 
eled, having been until then a swim- 
ming pool. The member retorted by 
asking the manager "Why did they 
ever change it?" 

A new author looming up, who, ac- 
cording to himself, promises to over- 
shadow the leading dramatists of the 
day. He is Jean Hickenlooper, of Al- 
bia, la. Jean sent the manuscripts of 
six plays this week and wrote a letter 
saying, "the sooner you fellers realize 
I am in this play writing business to 
stay, the better for all of us." One of 
his efforts is a drama in four acts en- 
titled "Outwitting the Devil." It con- 
tains dialog and business and the entire 
play can be read in exactly 17 minutes 
by the clock. 

The Loew office basketball team 
composed of Alex Hanlon, Sol Turek, 
Charlie Moskowitz, Moe Schenck aud 
Abe Friedman played its first game 
Saturday of last week, having as it? 
opponents the heavyweight team of 
the University Settlement The Loew 
boys were defeated 19-14. Their op- 
ponents are considered one of the best 
amateur teams in the city. Following 
the game a banquet was tendered the 
players at the Monopole Cafe, the 
guests including Dorothy Reuter, Edna 
Stevens, Victoria Blauvelte, Grace Hur- 
ley, Flossie Flynn, Ruth Fallow, Joe 
Horn, Jimmy Lyons, Louis Lavine, 
Eddie Resnick, Sam Fallow, Nathan 
Lavine, Chas. Diamond, Harry Nestler, 
Leonard Harber. 

Doc Steiner, the most versatile dia- 
lectician in vaudeville, finally admits 
someone "put one over" on him this 
week. An acrobat approached Doc at 
the soda water fountain in a drug store 
and began boasting about the value of 
his act. Doc was annoyed, but patient- 
ly waited until the man declared he 
stopped the show at the Fifth Avenue 
theatre, whereupon the old physician 
lost his temper and with his strongest 
dialect and basso profundo voice passed 
the "iiHly word" and started to move 
(.IT. The man fallowed and offered t«» 
\>v\ Dot: ihry .stopped tilt show. " VVircir 
ihcy both put their dimes up the acro- 
bat whispered to Doc that the show was 
stopped for three full minutes because 
his wife was not fully dressed at cur- 
tain time. 



10 



LEGITIMATE, 



WITH THE PRESS AGENTS 



At the rrccnt Allies' Bazaar In Chicago, tbe 
"Follies" and tbe Jolson show viewed to out- 
shine each other in grabbing publicity bring- 
ing stunts. The Zeigfeld organizations pat In 
an appearance in groups but a coup, engineer- 
ed by Sam Uerson, Ed Bloom and Ben Atwell, 
finally brought the palm to the Shubert show. 
This was done by moving tbe entire company 
and production in vans and taxi cabs to the 
Coliseum, where the full show was given 

{ratis. This little stunt cost tbe show about 
000, tbe musicians, transfer and stage crew 
having to be paid for and photographs of the 
event for tbe dallies costing $200, On Satur- 
day night last Mrs. Kellog Falrbank, Chi- 
cago's society belle, who succeeded Mrs. Pot- 
ter Palmer, entertained members of both the 
"Follies" and the "Robinson Crusoe" com- 
panies who had helped her at the cabaret 
booth, which she took care of at the baiaar 
and which is said to have been the most suc- 
cessful of all the booths. 



— J 

N. C. Grantlund, chief of the Loew pub- 
licity bureau, admits he Is the best road driver 
of a car In the world, and bases the assertion 
on the trip made by him In an Overland, from 
New York to Providence (210 miles) in 61& 
hours. If you don't believe that, Mr. Grant- 
lund says be made the return trip In eight 
hours, and If still in doubt, he's willing to 
show the car. 



A new movement was started this week by 
the "Brighten Up Sixth Ave." committee 
composed of merchants and property owners 
os>Uth avenue, between 42nd and 40th streets, 
to have that section of the town as bright as 
the Times Square section and to force the 
Interboro to brighten up the elevated struc- 
ture In that section. Jack Dunston is chair- 
man of the committee. 



E. A. Bfaden has obtained the consent of 
the French authorities to bring "The Band 
from the Trenches" to America for a concert 
tour under the patronage of the Society for 
the Re-education of the Maimed Soldiers in 
France. F. Percy Weadon will have charge 
of the pabHcity for the tour. The band Is due 
in about a month. The first concert Is to be 
held In Carnegie Hall, New York. 

The big spread In last Sunday's metropoli- 
tan newspapers' advertising sections was the 
announcement of the concert debut of Mrs. 
William J. Qaynor, widow of the late Mayor 
of New York. She will make her bow to the 
public as a singer Feb. 2, In the Brooklyn 
Academy of Music. 



The Bhuberts promise a production shortly 
of "Nypusa," an operetta by Sosmo Hamilton 
and Leslie Stuart. They promised it once 
before back in October, but the morning pa- 
pers seemed to have forgotten it and printed 
the paragraph all over again. 

A. W. Batchelder left yesterday for Chicago 
to take charge of the advance ,for "Katlnka" 
there. He has Just completed the prelimi- 
nary road tour with "You're In Love" and 
handled the New York opening for the at- 
traction. 



Maude Adams' engagement at the Empire, 
first set for eight weeks, has been extended 
four weeks. This will make it necessary to 
postpone her Boston appearance until next 
season. 



The John Cort new show, "Johnny Get Your 
Gun," Is publishing, wherever playing, a writ- 
ten endorsement from Alexander P. Moore, of 
the Pittsburgh "Leader," In which his wife, 
Lillian Russell, Joins. 

Rita Jollvet will return to the stage in "A 
Nigger in tbe Woodpile." Miss Jollvet, now 
Countess Gulseppe de Clpplco, will turn her 
salary over to an Itelian war charity, accord- 
ind to her statement in the New York papers. 



Charles Hopkins will produce "Some Men 
and a Lady" at the Punch and Judy. It is the 
first play of a new dramatist, Meade Mlnne- 
gerode. 



The second edition of "Tho Show of Wond- 
ers, " will bo revealed at the Winter Garden 
Feb. 12, on the occasion of the 150th per- 
formance at that house. 



Miss Hedwlg Rclcher will rIvo four dra- 
matic recitals at the Comedy theatre, begin- 
ning Feb. 4. 



Nearly $10,000 was cleared at the benefit for 
the ActorB' Fund in the Century late last 
week. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

Stetson and Hubcr ("Hans and Fritz"). 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

A revised version of "Pedro the 
Italian" will open on the International 
Feb. 12 in Jersey City. The company 



will include James Kyle McCurdy, 
Frank Readick and Peart Ford. The 
piece is being staged by Neil Toomey. 
A singing quartet will be carried as an 
added attraction. 

Arthur Alston's "The Girl He 
Couldn't Buy" closed Saturday in In- 
dianapolis. 

The Gotham,' Brooklyn, was dropped 
from the International this week. 

"Mutt and Jeff's Wedding" played 
to $3,600 at the Bron:» lr t week. 

"Little Women" did over $4,000 at 
the Castle Square, Boston, last week. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

The new production of "Her Un- 
born Child," which had its premiere 
at the National last week claims to have 
done the biggest business on the week 
of any International Circuit show that 
has played the house this season. The 
Indianapolis house which turned the 
show down, objecting to its title, is re- 
ported as getting the piece later. The 
company went from here to St. Louis 
with Kansas City to follow. 

Poli's, Washington, will be dropped 
from the International after this week. 
The house will install stock commenc- 
ing Monday. 

WATCHING STANDEES. 

The inspectors attached to the office 
of Commissioner of Licenses Bell were 
active Saturday night about New York 
theatres, watching the number of 
standees permitted. Sunday they paid 
especial attention to the picture houses. 
The reports have been turned in and 
the Commissioner will issue warnings 
this week. 

Commissioner Bell stated he did not 
propose to take the responsibility in the 
event of any panic that might be caused 
in any of the theatres by the managers 
overcrowding with standees, and he 
intended to take steps to eliminate any 
possibility of such a panic. After the 
managers are once warned, and do not 
heed the warnings the Commissioner 
will revoke the licenses. 



REBUILDING IN SEATTLE 

Seattle, Jan. 31. 

Eugene Lefy has announced he will 
build a theatre to replace the Grand, re- 
cently destroyed bv fire. The location 
was not disclosed, but it is known Levy 
controls a site at Third and Pike 
streets. 

The projected theatre will have ca- 
pacity of 2,000 and will cost about 
$250,000 according to the announced 
plans. 



NAZIM0VA— NO THEATRE 

" 'Ception Shoals," with Nazimova, is 
another of the numerous attractions 
seeking a New York playhouse. The 
piece is playing to capacity at the 299- 
seat Princess, but is compelled to move 
out to make way for "Oh Boy." 

Up to date all efforts to secure an- 
other theatre in town have proved fruit- 
less. 



LEADING WOMAN ENGAGED. 

Margaret Brainard, leading woman 
with William Collier, is engaged to be 
married to Gus K. Worms, a stock- 
broker whose home is in New Orleans. 
The marriage is to take place in July. 



"BRIDE" NEXT WEEK. 

Max Marcin's farce, "Here Comes 
the Bride," produced by Edgar Mc- 
Gregor is to open in Schenectady, N. 
Y. t next week. The piece will visit 
Syracuse. Rochester and Euffalo before 
New York. Oza Waldrovr-wiU play the 
ingenue lead. 

Next season Miss Waldrop will be 
starred in "Friend Martha," to open 
early in August at a 42d street theatre. 



CHICAGO SHOW RECEIPTS. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

With the automobile snow opening 
Saturday the current week should 
prove the flood tide of the theatrical 
season — a season which for big busi- 
ness has no precedent. The AMolson 
show in its fifth week at the Garrick 
boosted its top price to $3, figuring a 
sure capacity through the influx of the 
conventionites, though the "Follies" at 
the Illinois in its sixth week did not 
disturb its top rate of $2.50. Conclu- 
sive proof of the record breaking sea- 
son is shown in the taking of these 
two musical shows. For its five weeks 
so far the Jolson show has averaged 
$21,100 weekly, while the Zeigfeld or- 
ganization has shaded this by averag- 
ing $21,500 weekly for six weeks. 

The Boomerang" in at Powers in its 
twelfth week shows no sign of abate- 
ment and the expectations are that it 
will get close to $16,000. The success 
of the Belasco piece is all the more in- 
teresting since rowers has been known 
for years as a "hoodoo" house, though 
it is within a stone's throw of the 
Sherman Hotel. Not since "The Music 
Master" and "Daddy Long Legs" sev- 
eral seasons ago, has Powers berthed 
a success, until now save the flash of 
"Shirley Kaye" early this season. 

"Potash and Perlmutter in Society" 
at the Olympic is a newcomer in the 
lists and got a sell out opening Sunday 
night. It seemed a mistake to route 
out the Dolly Sisters for their show 
drew heavily Saturday and could have 
played to big business during this, the 
auto show week, while no harm would 
have been done the "P. & P." show 
coming a week later. 

"Turn to the Right" has settled down 
to a solid run at the Grand, while 
"Fair and Warmer" at the Cort con- 
tinues to splendid business and has a 
full month yet to run. "Arms and the 
Girl" is generally well spoken of. Just 
what it will do at the Blackstone is a 
problem for that theater has about as 
poor a drawing power as any in the 
city. 

Nearby and also outside the "Loop" 
is the Chicago, notorious for its poor 
drawing power, and there T. Roy 
Barnes began a return engagement with 
"Katinka" Sunday night. The top price 
is $2.00 and not $1.50 as stated last 
week, with $2.50 asked for the boxes. 
The show played six successful weeks 
at the Garrick last fall and is booked 
four weeks at the Chicago. But even 
the company management doubts the 
ability of the attraction to last that 
long. 

William H6dge drags along at the 
Princess, another house handicapped 
by location and is drawing about $7,000 

"Hip. Hip, Hooray" at the Auditor- 
ium did not open up to expectations, 
Chicago figuring that it was a "New 
York show." An advance of $16,000 
was gotten for this week, figured most- 
ly from the convention crowds. The 
first night got about $2,900 with busi- 
ness jumping late in the week and 
capacity being played to Saturday. It 
develops the failure to open last week 
(Tuesday night) was not due to late ar- 
rival, but to the transfer men who did 
not begin hauling until noon on Tues- 
day. The ice rink was all ready, there 
being two sets of freezing apparatus 
carried and alternate plants being used. 

The Hip show is booked in for eight 
weeks, but can stay longer as the Audi- 
torium has held its time open after 
that. The show's western trip has gone 
far above expectations, surprising the 
management which began the invasion 
pessimistically. The highest weekly 
gross since the show left New York 
was obtained in Kansas City, where 
$49,000 was taken. St. Paul, too, was 
large, the gross being around $35,000. 
The total weekly expense of the Hip 
show runs around $20,000. 

The Hip management has put three 
scales of prices into effect at the Audi- 
torium, with $2.00 top at night and Sat- 
urday afternoon, $1.50 top tor Sunday 
afternoon and $1.00 for the other mat- 
inees. 



RABID THEATRE BILL 

The United Managers' Protective As- 
sociation held a meeting Wednesday. 
Four important measures were brought 
up. The first was a discussion of the 
steps to be taken by the organization 
against the proposed legislation in New 
York, New Jersey and Illinois, harm- 
ful to theatrical interests. The second, 
the decision of the U. S. Supreme 
Court on music copyrights, and third, 
a discussion of the Tudor bill, now in 
committee at Albany. 

The bill only covers New York City. 
It amends the general business law 
and was introduced in Albany Jan. 17 
by Mr. Tudor and referred to the Com- 
mittee on Affairs of Cities. The act 
provides it shall be unlawful for any 
person, association, co-partnership or 
corporation to charge or receive a 
greater price for tickets for, or admis- 
sion to theatres, bathing houses or 
pavilions, or any places of public 
amusement in cities of over one million 
inhabitants, on any day during the 
week, than is charged or received on 
any other day during the said week. 
Each violation of the act to be a mis- 
demeanor. 

The general idea is that the bill is 
directed principally at the bathing pa- 
vilions at Coney Island, where the 
rates for a bath house varies from 25 
cents to $1 according to whether it is 
a week day or a Sunday. The theatre 
managers believe this will give the bill 
sympathy and aid in its passage, but 
they •are going to combat the including 
of theatres in the same. It would not 
only effect the raising of the prices of 
theatre seats to $2.50 Saturday nights, 
but would also make it a misdemeanor 
for the ticket agencies to receive more 
than the face value of the tickets, as is 
provided for. 

The question of permitting numbers 
of musical comedy productions to be 
played in hotels and restaurants will 
mean the managers will take over con- 
trol for all of the numbers in their pro- 
ductions and if any royalty is paid the 
managers want it. Their idea is to 
add it to the gross earning of the pro- 
duction and permit the author to get his 
royalty from that. The managers, if 
they successfully put this over will have 
a very powerful lever against any or- 
ganization of musicians should a strike 
arise, for they could prohibit all union 
musicians from playing any of their 
numbers anywhere. 

A resolution passed approving the 
efforts being made by the Commis- 
sioner of Licenses against theatrical 
performances in cabarets. 

DALY OUT IN THREE WEEKS. 

Arnold Daly expects to be out of the 
hospital in about three weeks when, he 
savs, he will revive "The Master." 

Mr. Daly has had numerous offers of 
financial assistance for the venture. 



TEARLE WANTS PICTURES. 

Conway Tearle engaged to appear in 
the legitimate under the management 
of Oliver Morosco. Sinoe then he has 
received a more lucrative offer to be- 
come a picture actor and is endeavor- 
ing to secure a release from the 
Morosco aereement. 



Broadhurst Collaborating with Schooner 

George Broadhurst is collaborating 
with Abram Schomer on another play 
adapted from the Yiddish, from which 
source he and Schomer secured the 
plot of "To-Day." 

Schomer has taken offices with 
Broadhurst in the 48th Street theater 
building. 



Breaking in Road Organizations. 
Two road companies to appear next 
season in "The 13th Chair" are to be 
assembled and broken in before taking 
to the wilds next fall. The selected 
players wiil 'he. given try-outs m the 
New York production from time to 
time. 

If you don't odvartlao In VARIETY, 
don't advtrtiM. 



LEGITIMATE, 



11 



BIG MUSICAL SHOWS AT $2.50 
RULE FOR ROAD NEXT SEASON 



JUDGMENTS. 



it 



"Chin Chin" and Jokon Show Now Getting That 
Scale. ShuberU to Fix that Price As Top for All Tour- 
ing Winter Garden Shows. Hinterland Cities 

Fall for the Boost. 



Judgments filed in the County 
Clerics office. The first name is that of 
the judgment debtor, the second the 
judgment creditor, and the amount of 
the judgment 

Melville Ellis— Van Praag Floret Co., 
$279.45. 

Comet Film Co.— N. Y. Tel. Co., 
$442.29. 

Harry H. Frazee— N. Y. TeL Co., 
$442.29. 

Wilfrank Amusement Co.— N. Y. Tel 
Co., $39.33. 

Brook Feature Film Corp— E. Gold- 



There seems to be a general trend 
among the producing managers to es- 
tablish a $2.50 top scale for the bigger 
musical attractions on tour for the' 
coming season. At present it is pretty 
generally conceded next season will 
find all of the Winter Garden attrac- 
tions, Montgomery and Stone and "The 
Follies" asking that price for the best 
seats in all towns outside of New York. 

This season the managers have been 
feeling their way and in nearly all in- 
stances where they have tried for the 
higher price, have met with success. 
In Cleveland the Al Jolson show played 
to $22.000. gross on the week with $2.50 
top. The local management stated it 
would be impossible to get that price 
when it was first suggested, but the 
sale proved that the greatest demand 
was for higher priced seats. The Jol- 
son show is charging $2.50 top at the 
Garrick, Chicago, and "The Follies" at 
the Illinois there, is securing the same 
scale. 

Montgomery and Stone in "Chin 
Chin" played to a $2.50 top in Minne- 
apolis and St. Paul. 

'The Passing Show," booked into 
Cleveland for two weeks is to play at 
$2.50 and there has been a considerable 
amount wavered the attraction will 
take $40,000 out of the town on the en- 
gagement. 

Producers feel tlfat as long as they 
are sending the bier attractions on tour 
with the original New York companies 
in a srreat 'extent they should get a 
larger return than the "No. 3" and "4" 
companies of a number of Broadway's 
near-dramatic successes, which are get- 
ting the $2 top scale. 



"BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN" MILD. 

Hartford, Conn., Jan. 31. 

"The Beautiful Unknown" was pre- 
sented here for the first time Monday 
night by the Shuberts. The music is 
by Oscar Strauss, book adapted from 
the original of Tacobson and Stein by 
Edward A. Paulton. 

The piece is beautifully mounted and 
costumed, the music is excellent, but 
the comedy values are not very high. 
The audience at the premiere was not 
over enthusiastic. 

In the cast are Lionel Belmore, J. H. 
Gpldsworthy, Charles MacNaughton, 
Ned Monroe, Sari Petrass, Frances 
Demarcst, Maude Odell, Nora White, 
Doris Marvin. 



SHOWS IN PHILLY. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 31. 
Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree support- 
ed by Edith Wynne Matthison and Lyn 
Harding had the field to himself for 
openings this' week and his "Henry 
VIII" was presented to a crowded 
house at the Garrick Monday night. 
The piece was very warmly received 
by the press. Tree remains over an- 
other week to be followed by "Fair and 
Warmer." 

George Arliss in the second week 
of "The Professor's Love Story" is do- 
ing fine businenss at the Broad. John 
Drew in "Major Pendennis" is under- 
lined. 

An unusual incident occurred in con- 
iK'ctisn v.ith the presentation of 
v ' Betty" at the Forrest. The piece has 
been fairlv well received here, but sev- 
eral of the papers in their Sunday re- 
views took a "hot shot" at Raymond 



Hitchcock for his travesty hits at Billy 
Sunday, made by the droll comedian 
during his curtain speeches. The ref- 
erence to the evangelist has not met 
with any approval at all here and it is 
considered bitchy" made a mistake in 
having anything to say about him. One 
paper referred to the poor business 
done by the piece in Boston during the 
Billy Sunday revival there as the cause 
of Hitchcock's remarks. 

"The Blue Paradise" is* in its last 
week at the Lyric, where it has been 
for six weeks, playing to fair business 
on the engagement Anna Held in 
"Follow Me" Comes next wek. 

"Very Good Eddie" is still drawing 
big in its fifth week at the Adelphl. 

SHOWS IN NEW ORLEANS. 

New Orleans, Tan. 31. 
"Experience" is doing nicely at the 
. Tulane. 

"Mutt and Jeff" is playing to capacity 
at the Crescent 

Sarah Bernhardt got $4,000 in two 
performances at the Dauphihe. 
Returns at the Lyric are satisfactory. 

SHOWS IN TRISCO. 

Sad Francisco, Jan. 31. . 

"Fair and Warmer' 'is doing medium 
business at the Cort in its third week. 
Alcazar and Savoy are holding up. 

"The Garden of Allah" business at 
the Columbia is not encouraging.. 

ANOTHER FOR DE HAVEN. 

G. M. Anderson has secured another 
piece in which he will present Carter 
De Haven, who was to have been fea- 
tured in "Some Girl" (taken out of re- 
hearsal because the story was too simi- 
lar to that of the "Love O' Mike"). 

The new piece is by Rida Johnson 
Young and the cast is being selected 
this week. 



berg* $90.54. 

Kemble Film Corp. — C a i p h a r t s 
Maiknown Methods, Inc., $95.58. 

Wm. A. Kane & Brook Feature Film 
Corp.— E. Goldberg, $427.38. 

C. C Wilkening, Inc.— A. H. Kauf- 
mann, $1,097.41. 

Preston Gibson — Hauptner & Co., 
$35.65. 

John C Fisher & Hiram R. Fisher— 
H. W. Bean, $331.61. 

Jeanette Dupre — B. J. Conroy, 
$541.20. 

Theo. W. Myers— Sol Bloom, $1,- 
107.3a 



BANKRUPTCY PETITIONS. 

Brook Feature Film Corp., liabilities 
$37,625, assets $13,566. Hampton D. 
Ewing was appointed receiver. 



JUDGMENTS SATISFIED. 

Felix Isman — E. Fitzsimons, adm'x, 
$104.49. » 

Same — same, $8,328.44. 
Same — same, $160.64. 



"EDDIE" SAILS FEB. 17. 

The company that is to appear In 
London in "Very Good Eddie 1 * is to 
sail for abroad on Feb. 17. The piece 
will be presented abroad under an- 
other name, because the "Eddie" title 
means nothing abroad and "Over 
Night" was presented there as a pic- 
ture. Beth Franklyn was added to the 
cast this week. 



Keane and Kleine Sailing. 

Robert Emmett Keane sails Feb. 10 
for London with Philip Kleine, who is 
to produce in the English metropolis 
two of William Colliers pieces, "Noth- 
ing But the Truth" and "On the Quiet." 




McSHANE & HATHAWAY. LEON ERROL, Producer. 

After p!ayinpr al! the big time metropolitan vaudeville theatres, have in preparation a new 
version ot thrir.nj-rv'nt offering Under, .tor ftfcgfe dJttrrfofC .of. X.EC/N feRHCIEL of "ThrXerifory f,jr| ••'. 

Mr. Erroil has devised at novelty finish to ihe turn in a fast comedy eceentriqat dance, which 
has a sensational punch. Special music has been provided by Harry Von Tilzer and Mr. Errol. 

Miss Hathaway will continue to feature the beautiful "OLIVER TWIST" dress which she baa 
originated. 

Personal direction of HARRY FITZGERALD. 



ALASKA GIRL A PLANT. 

Well, it is "all out in the wash!" 
Louise Sachen, the "unspoiled child of 
nature," who was meat and drink to 
the sob sisters of the dailies for all of 
a week, has been "discovered" as the 
daughter of "a sparrow cop" in a park 
in Kansas City. 

Now for the "dirt." Louise was just 
a "plant," but a mighty good one. She 
grabbed off big space from some of the 
New York papers, and with the ex- 
pose which ran for a couple of columns 
Monday of this week, Walter Kingslev 
comes to the front and modestly ad- 
mits that he and MacFarland (press 
agent of the McAloin Hotel) "framed" 
the entire proceeding for Louise to be 
one of the features of the Palace bill in 
the near future. 

Nellie Revelle at the Century had the 
first shot at the "unspoiled child" and 
the "Herald" went to the story for a 
three-column spread about Louise's 
first visit to any theatre. Since then 
almost every other press agent in 
town has had her at his theatre as a 
guest. 

The two oress agents, Kingsley and 
MacFarland, do not work together very 
well, however, for Mondav Louise was 
at the Hinoodrome with a note offering 
to let Mark Luescher have all the 
credit for the plant if they would give 
her a Job in the show. 

SHOWS CLOSING. 

Schenectady, N. Y., Jan. 31. 
"Go To It" closed here Saturday. 
The company was disbanded and the 
production sent to the storehouse in 
New York. 

Pittsfield, Jan. 31. 
"Oh, Oh, Delphine" closed Saturday 
because of principals. The company 
will be reorganized with only Arline 
Fredericks, Carl Haydfen and Elsie 
Bartlett remaining. 



HARRY SINGER HERE. 

Harry Singer, former manager of 
the Palace, Chicago, arrived in New 
York this week to take up his duties in 
the headquarters of the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit Mr. Singer, who is a brother of 
Mort Singer, general manager of the 
Western vaudeville Managers' Asso- 
ciation, will become associated with the ' 
booking department of the Orpheuro 
circuit. 

Ross Behne is now looking after the 
managerial reins of the Palace. Chi- 
cago, having been identified with that 
house for several years. 

Earl Saunders also returned to New 
York last week, having remained in the 
Chicago Orpheum offices but a short 
time. Cal Griffiths will handle the Or- 
pheum circuit's interests in the Windy 
City. 

RECORD FOR EXPERIENCE. 

Los Angeles, Cat, Jan. 31. 
"Experience" opened Monday to a 
big advance sale and the engagement 
promises to establish a new record at 
Mason's for the current season. 



ANGLIN IN BUFFALO. 

Margaret Anglin's debut as a star 
under the management of George C. 
Tyler will be made at the Star, Buffalo, 
Monday, in "The Lioness." 

The piece will open at the Black- 
stone, Chicago, the week following. 



$2.50 AT MOROSCO. 

The new Morosco, opening Monday, 
is to charge $2 50 for its orchestra 
seats. This makes the fifth metropoli- 
tan playhouse charging these prices — 
the Century, Astor, Shubert and Win- 
ter Garden. 



"Small Town Girl" Starting. 

A. H. Woods will- put- -into- rehearsal- 
iii February the new play by Eugene 
Walter, entitled "The Small Town 
Girl," in which Charlotte Walker is to 
be starred. 



•• 






12 



VARIETY 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (FEBRUARY 5) 

I» VatkUriUa TWtro* 

(All houiet open for the week with Moaday matinee, whea act otherwise Indicated.) 

Theatre* Hated as "Orpheum" without any farther distiaguishlag description are oa the 
Orpheum Circuit. Theatre* with "S-C" and "A-B-C following- aasne (usually '^Empress") are aa 
the Sullivan-Considine-Affiliated Booking Company Circuit. 

Agencies booking the houses are noted by single aame or initials, each as "Orph." Orphcam 
Circuit- "U B O." United Becking Omces-"W VII V' Western Vaudeville Managers' Aisocia. 
tion (Chicago)— "P." Pent ages Circuit— "Loew." Marcus Loew Circuit— "Inter,** IatersUte Circuit 
(booking through W. V. M. A.)-"Sun," Sua Clrcuit-"N M,» Ntaoa-Nlrdliager. ^^ 

SPECIAL NOTlCEt The manner in which these bills are printed does not indicate the rela- 
tive importance of acts nor their program positions. The haste ia which the bills are gathered 
prevents any attention being given these matters. 



New York 

PALACE (orph) 
Mile Dasle Co 
Clark a Hamilton 
Willie Weston 
Asahi Troupe 
Jack Norworth 
•• Patria" 
(Two to nil) 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
Howard & Clark 
Mme Doree Co 
Lydell a Higglns 
M Montgomery 
Hamilton a Barnes 
Kerr a Weston 
Nolan a Nolan 
"Patria" w x 

ALHAMBRA (ubo) 

Bills A Bordonl 
Mack A Walker 
Inglls A Reading 
Wilfred Clarke Co 
Frankle Rice 
Klmberly A Arnold 
Stelndel Broa 
Herbert's Dogs 
"Patria" (Film) 
ROYAL (ubo) 
Belie tSaker 
"Motor Boating" 
Bancroft A Broskle 
Geo Roaener 
Mlnenra Courtney 
Mohr A Moffatt 
Reddlngton A Grant 
"Dixie" 

RIVERSIDE (ubo) 
Rath Bros 

De Forrest A Kearns 
Ellis A BorUonl 
Laurie A Bronaon 
Adelaide A Hughes 
Marie Nordstrom 
Brlce A King 
Stuart Barnes 
"Patria" (Film) 

5TH AV (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 

5 Paudurs 

Mason A Murray 

Helen Ray Co 

Emma Cams 

Great Howard 

Crelghton Belmont 

Johnson A Harty 

Lew Wilson 

Koban Japs 

1st half (5-8) 

Pete A Pals 

Shorty De Witt 

M Freeman Co 

Crawford A Broderlck 

5 Vagrants 

RAO Dooley 

"Dog Watch" 

H O H (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 

Tbeo A Daudles 

Conrad A Conrad 

Robt Armstrong Co 

Ash ft Shaw 

Meadowbrook Lane 

Chas Kenna 

"Oriental Folies" 

125TH ST (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Soretty A Antonette 
Shorty De Witt 
Maurice Freeman Co 
Van Bergen A Cosier 
Small A Sister 
Ben Deeley Co 
Phllllplno o 

23RD ST (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Lillian Sisters 
Sobron A Lewis 
Tbe Cop 
Lewis A Chapln 
"Excelsior Models" 
Northlane A Ward 
Savannah A Georgia 
"Camp In Rockies" 
Sampson A Douglas 

1st half (TS-8) 
Upside D Mullettes 
StagpoOle A Spire 
Jack Gardner 
Grovcr A Richards 
Maud Ryan 

AMERICAN (loew) 
Hayes A Ward 
Sinclair A Hart 
Lee's Hawaallan 2 
E J Moore 
"Paris Fas Shop" 
Laurie Ordway 
Mllloy KeoiiRh Co 
Keno Keys A M 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Fred's Plga 
Chabot ft Dixon 
Leonard A Ferguson 
.Turk ;Golqie ' 

iVyiric'ur flrown Co 
CAM Cleveland 
R Schmettfln ft Dro 
(Two to fill) 



LINCOLN (loew) 
Cooper ft Hartman 
Chabot A Dixon 
Barry McCormack Co 
L Wolfe Gilbert 
Borslnl Tr 

2d half 
Judge A Oail 
Lee Tong Foo 
Burke A Burke 
Mimic World 

7TH AV (loew) 
R Schmettan A Bro 
Mae Marvin 
Warren A Frost 
Evil Hour 
Bell Boy 3 
(One to fill) 

2d halt 
Leypo A Benjamin 
Harrington A Lamster 
Sandy Shaw 
LaCosta A Clifton 
Vinton A Buster 
Fascinating Flirts ' 
GREELEY (loew) 
Lee Tong Foo 
Burke A Burks 
Harris A Lyman 
Red Fox Trot 
Vinton A Buster 
Judge A Gall 

2d half , 
Potter A Hartwell 
Florence Rayfleld 
Mullen A Rogers 
Barry McCormack Co 
Percy Pollock Co 
"Paris Fas Shop" 
(One to fill) 

DELANCEY (loew) 
Potter A Hartwell 
Florence Rayfleld 
Rlos A Francis 
LaCosta A Clifton 
Jimmy Lyons 
Fascinating Flirts 

2d\alf 
Parlse Duo 
Gould A Lewis 
Prevost A Ooelet 
L Wolfe Colbert 
Dorothy Burton Co 
Pealson A Rose 
4 Dordeens 
(One to All) 

NATIONAL (loew) 
Henry A Ldtel 
Harrington A Lamster 
Jack Goldle 
Every Man's Sis 
Percy Pollock Co 
4 Roedera 

2d half 
Cooper A Hartman 
Harris A Lyman 
Caaaon A Earle 
Barbler Thatcher Co 
Nat Carr 
3 Daring Sisters 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Fred's Pigs 
Beulah Pearl 
Foster ft Ferguson 
Leonard A Anderson 
Chase A LaTour 
6 Peachea A Pair 

2d half 
Hayes A Ward 
Brandell A Bell 
Borslnl Tr 
Miller A Vincent 
Hoey A Lee 
"Criminal" 
Dancing Mars 
(One to fill) 
BOULEVARD (loew) 
3 Norrle Sis 
Alice Cole 
W A M Rogers 
Frank Whlttler Co 
Hoey ft Lee 

2d half 
Aerial Eddys 
Tl Ling Sing 
Barnes ft Robinson 
Helen Page Co 
Clark ft McCullough 

AVE B (loew) 
Soldier's Wife 
Murray Bennett 
(Three to fill) 
2d half 
Reed ft Wright 
B ft H Mann 
Chappelle A Vldocq 
(Two to fill) 

Brooklyn 
ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Rock ft White 
Clark ft Bergman Ce 
Chic Sale 
"Peacock Alley" 
Hugh Herbert 
Rockwell ft Wood 
T/Oney T?o«Voll 
•"I'he I* f<f i»h 
'"Patria" (Film) 

BU8HWICK (ubo) 
Eva Tanguay 

"Devil He Did," 



Eddie Carr Co 
Moon A Morrla 
Chas Ahearn Co 
Harrla A Man Ion 
Frank Westphal 
Frank A Toby 

HALSEY (ubo) 

2d half (1-4) 
Ivanhoff A Valoyda 
"Putting on Airs" 
Bud A Nellie Helm 
Church Trainer Co 
Willam Hanlon Co 
PROSPECT (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Ena Claron 
Lee A Bennett 
Clark A Hamilton 
Mabls Johnson 
"What Hap Ruth" 
RAG Dooley 
Jordan Girls 
GREENPOINT (ubo) 

2d half (1-4) 
Neher A Kapelle 
Holden A Hsrroa 
Hickman Shaw A C 
Doss 

Ed Morton 
Linton A Girls 

BIJOU (loew) 
Paries Duo 
Hilda Sohneo 
Nan Howlns Co 
Caaaon A Earle 
Seymour Brown Co 

2d half 
2 Georges 
Rlos 4 Francis 
D J Moors 
Red Fox Trot 
Laurie Ordway 
Lee's Hawaiian 2 
DEKALB (loew) 
Tl Ling Sing 
Clinton A Rooney 
Sandy Shaw 
"Criminal' 
Mack A Vlnoent 
4 Dordeens 

2d half 
Henry A Liiel 
Beulah Pearl 
Foster A Ferguson 
6 Peaches A Pair 
W A M Rogers 
Klutlng's Animals 

PALACE (losw) 
Reed A Wright 
Alice Hanson 
Gliding O'Mearaa 
(Two to fill) 
2d half 
Telegraph 3 
( Four to fill) 

FULTON (loew) 
Downs A Gomes 
Barnea A Robinson 
Storm A Marsden 
Clark A McCullough 
Joeephua Tr 

2d half 

3 Crelghton Girls 
Warren A Frost 
Everyman'a 81a 
Mask A Vincent 

4 Roeders 

WARWICK (loew) 
Hendrlx A Padula 
Hoey A Lee 
(Two to fill) 

* 2d half 

Clinton A Rosney 
Murray Bennett 
(Two to fill) 

Albany. N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
The Ysltos 
Bell A Freda 
Dahl A Olllen 
Frank Terry 
Calif Boys' Band 

2d half 
"Yankee" A "Dixie" 
Jessie Standlsh 
Warren A Conley 
Frank Mayne Co 
Joe Cook 
Calif Boys' Band 

AUeatown, fa. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Reddlngton A Grant 
Orrln A Drew 
"Every Man Needs" 
Comfort A King 
Health Review 
2d half 
O'Neil Sisters 
Alvln A Williams 
Polishing Papa 
June Mills Co 
"Camp In Rockies" 

Altoa. 111. 

HIPP (wva) 
Hrt.V £t)OW 
Carl Roalhl Co 
2d half 
Four Renees 
pllvcr A Duval 



Altooi 

ORPHEUM' (ubo) 
Williams A Held 
"Bars One Girl" 
Milton A Do Longs 
Two Franks 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Harry Ward 
Macart A Bradford 
Amer Comedy 4 
•Maids of Music" 



Fiddler A Shslton 
"On the Veranda" 
Ralph Connora 
4 Bards 

Bay City, Mink. 

ulJOU (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
C A A Glocker 
Fiddler A Shelton 
"On Veranda" 
Ralph Connora 
4 Barda 

Uelalt, Win. 

WILSON (wva) 
2d half (8-10) 
George Mack 
Four Roses 
Troy Comedy 3 
Btngrnamtoa, N. Y. 

STONE (uboj 
Jack La Vie r 
Davenport A Rafferty 
Llda McMillan Co 

2d half 
Jos Reed 
O MUllngton Co 
(One to fill) 



Ga. 

(ubo) 



■ NY 
LYCEUM* (ubo) * 
Flak A Fallon 
TAB Moore 

2d half 
Dora Hilton Co 
Ed Grey 
"Harvest Days" 
Anpleten, Wlsw 
BIJOU (wra) 
Troy Comedy 8 
Lua A Analska 
2d half 
Kawana Bros 
(One to AH) 

Atlanta* 

FOKSYTHB 
Bleknell 
Kltner Taylor A McK 
Ceclle Weston Co 
Ward A Van 
Jean Adair Co 
'Tango Shoos" 
Fred Bowers Co 
RIALTO (ubo) 
(Macon split) 
1st half 
John Le Clair 
Ruth Curtis 
Black A White 
Leonard! 
O'Donnell A Blair 

O H (loew) 
I A W Brooks 
Ed A Jack Smith 



BIJOU (ubo) 
(Nashville Split) 
1st half 
Merle's Cockatoos 
Havlland A Thornton 
"Discontent" 
Webb A Burns 
Geo Damerel Co 



Rev 



KEITH'S (ubo) 
Fay Templeton 
B Beeley Co 
Grace Do Mar i 
Hals A Patterson 
Gallagher A Lewis 
Dyer A Faye 
Donald Roberta 
Roy A Antrim 
"Patria" (Film) 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Tyler A Sinclair 
Williams A Segal 
Equlllo Broa 
Grlndell A Esther 
Dr Joy'a Sanitarium 
(Two to fill) 

2nd half 
Sidney A Van 
Jessie Haywood Co 
Lillian Wataon 
Llplnski's Dogs 
Lew Hawkins 

(Two to fill) 
ST JAMES (loew) 
Sidney A Van 
Stone A Clear 
"Harmleaa Bug" 



' THE CORNELL 



Rates 



114-llt 



West 47th 
(Just 




New Ysrk City 

i ff .si upward par 

a $5.00 onward per _. 

W. I. SMITH; Mesaaer 



"Man in Dark" 

Tom Kelly 

Gleasons A O'Houllhan 

Auburn, N. H. 

J Ki- EH SUN (ubo) 
Doris Hilton Co 
Joe Reed 
"Hello Honolulu" 

2d half 
Jack La Vier 
"Midnight Follies" 
(One to fill) 

Auatln* Ton. 

MAJESTIC (Inter) 

(3-6) 

(Same bill playing 

Waco 7-8 and Ft 

Worth 0-11) 
Frank Harelty 
Dellsle A' Vernon 
McDevltt Kelly A L 
Dorothy Brenner 
Chip A Marble 
Eckert A Parker 
Morln Sisters 



Baltimore, 

MARYLAND (ubo) 
Elsa Ryan Co 
World Dancers 
Ed Morton 
Yvette 

Lewis A Felber 
Techow's Cats 
Asakl Japs 
Jas J Morton 

HIP (loew) 
Martyn A Mack 
Howard A Sadler 
Owen McOlvney 
E 6 M Foster 
Maurice Samuels Co 
Harry Breen 
Maestro 

Battle Creek, Nick. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
DeWitt Young ft Sis 
Booth by A Evcrdean 
Elsie Williams Co 
Chas Wilson 
Joesefson Tr 

2d half 
C A A Glocker 



Billy Dale Co 
N Adrian 

2nd half 
Carbray Bros 
Harry First Co 
Mabel Harper 
"Top of Andes" 
(One to fill) 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
POLTS (ubo) 
Bally Hoo 3 
Ernie A Ernie 
"Just for Instance" 
Clifford A Wills 
"Hello Japan" 

2d half 
Holden A Graham 
Durkln Girls 
Jack Kennedy Co 
Foster A Lovett 
Blllle Reeves Co 
PLAZA (ubo) 
Granville A Mack 
Greater City 4 
Mcintosh A Maids 

2d half 
Edwards A Louise 
Hal A Francla 
Musical Misses 
(To fill) 

Buffalo 

SHEA'S (ubo) 
Theo Kosloff Co 
Cole Russell A D 
Minnie Allen 
Vlollnsky 

Wilson A McNally's 
Branda Derrick 
Frank Shields 

OLYMPIC (sun) 
Spartan 3 
Noble a Brooks 
"Into Light" 
Gertie DeMIlt 
A Morecroft Co 

LYRIC (sun) 
Sylvester 
Adair A Wyant 
Delmar A Moore 
Clover Leaf 3 
Cycling Galvlns 

Butte. Mont. 

PANTAOES (p) 
(9-14) 
Morton Bros 



Jungle Man 
Amoros A Mulvey 
Daisy Jerome 
Harry Ross 
"Motor Madness" 

Calnary 

ORPHEUM 
C GUllngwnter Co 
Misses Campbell 
Pat Barrett 
Meredith A Snoossr 
Thos Swift Co 
Frank Wilson 
H A A Seymour 

PANT AGES (p) 
Leo A Mae Lefevre 
Oakland Sisters 
Bernardl 
Cadora 

Friend A Downing 
Rawls A V Kaufman 



DENTIST TO THI PROFESSION 

DR. A. P. LOESBERG 



Camden, Bf. J. 

TOWERS (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Von Cello 
Rogers A Hart 
"Maids of Music" 
Ben Harney Co 
Arthur Levins Co 

Canton. O. 

LYCEUM (ubo) 
Zaru Carman 8 
Nancy Baring 
Lottie Williams Co 
'Headline!*" 
Golden Troupe 
John Nsff 



TOM 



ETHEL 



KENNEDY and BURT 



MAJESTIC (wra) 
(Sunday opening) 

Jack A Foria 

Follette A Wicks 

Folsom A Brown 

LeRoy A Cahlll 

Brenda Fowler Co 

BAH Gordon 

Kartelll 

2d half 

Davis A Kitty 

Claudia Tracey 

"He's in Again" 

Caentaalgn, I1L 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
Hale Bros 
Grace Hanson 
"Petticoats" 
Spencer A Williams 
Balzar Sisters 
2d half 
Will Morris 
Victoria 4 
"Elopers" 
Lorraine ft Eagle 
Ross Bros 

Cnnrleaton* S. C. 

ACADEMY (ubo) 
Willie Mission Co 
Tonge A Jean 
Skipper Kennedy ft R 
The Seebacks 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Valentine ft Bell 
Lillian A Boggs 
Nevlns A Erwood 
4 Wire Kings 
(One to fill) 

Charlotte, N. C. 

PIEDMONT (ubo) 
(Roanoke Split) 
1st half 
Carllste ft Romer 
Cunningham A Marlon 
4 Poldrens 
(Two to fill) 

Chattanooga* Tenn. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
(Knoxvllie Split) 
1st half 
Seabury A Price 
Maybelle McDonald 
"Joy Riders" 
Walter Brower 
Beeman A Anderson 

Chicago 

MAJESTIC (orph) 
Digby Bell Co 
Mme Jomelll 
L Brlce A H Coyne 
Brooks A Bo wen 
Alaska 3 
Edwin George 
Dainty Marie 
Clara Howard 
"Patria" (Film) 

PALACE (orph) 
Cross A Josephine 
Morton A Glass 
D Shoemaker Co 
Ernest R Ball 
Water LUUea 
Valand & Gamble (N) 
4 Holloways 
Medlln Watts A T 
Foley A O'Neil 

AMERICAN (wva) 
Darn Good ft F 
Hal Stephens Co 
Cooper A Smith 
McRae A Clegg 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Melnotte Duo 
Keane A Wlllams 
"School Playgrounds" 
(One to fill) 

AVE (wva) 
"Naughty Princess" 

?.d heir 
Wa!tcr» A Wo It en 
Oonne A Albert 
Harris A Star 4 
McOoods Tates Co 
(One to Oil) 



FltassralS Bids. 

boms TO! 



I4S2 Broadway 
T«L 40M Bryant 



KEDZIE (wva) 
Four Renos 
Permalne 
Herman Lieb Co 
Eddie Borden Co 
Ward Bell ft W 

2d half 
August A August 
Mr A Mrs Wm O'Clare 
"Petticoats" 
Great Lester 
Grossman's Enter 9 

LINCOLN (wva) 
Melnotte Duo 
Nora Kellv Ce 
Keane A Williams 
Kane ft Herman 
Slg Franz Tr 

2d half 
4 Foolish Fellows 
Godfrey A Henderson 
"The Family" 
"School Days" 
(One to nil) 

WILSON (wva) 
The Brightons 
Walters A Walters 
Mme Sturkow-Ryder 
C Frances Relsner 
McGoods Tates Co 

2d half 
Permalne 

Mme Sturkow-Ryder 
Bison City 4 
Royal Toklo Tr 
(One to fill) 

WINDSOR (wva) 
Gonne A Albert 
Royal Toklo Tr 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Skelly A Helt 
Rawson A Clare 
Three Bartos 

McVICKER'S (loew) 
Arline 

Paul Decker Co 
Jerome A Carson 
Estrelllta 
Elliott A Mullen 
Hoyt's Minstrels 
Texas Round-Up 



Shattuck A Golden 
Bengyk's Models 
Knapp A Cornelia 
Thomas A Hall 
Frank Vrumlt 
L» Palerlca Co 

Datlna 

MAJESTIC (Inter) 
Richie A Burt 
Alexande* Kids 
Callsts Octant 
Hermlne Suons Co 
Brltt Wood 
Selma Brants 
(One to fill) 

Danville, 111. 

PALACE (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
"Sunnyside Bway" 

2d half 
McRae A Clegg 
Singing 4 
Dae A Neville 
Patrlcola A Meyers 
Phyllis Tr 

Dawennort 

COLUMBIA (wva) 
(Sunday Opening) 
"Maid to Order" 

2d half 
International Girl 
SUber A North 
"Right Man" 
Hope Vernon 
(One to fill) 



Cincinnati 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
(Sunday Opening) 
Olive Wyndham Co 
Ponzello Bisters 
Wood A Wyde 



KEITH'S (ubo) 
"Honor Thy Children" 
Old Homestead 8 
Wlllard Simms Co 
Watson Sisters 
Bennett Sisters 
Burley A Burley 
Gerard A Clark 
Gordon A Rica 

Decatur, DL 

EMPRESS (wra) 
(Sunday opening) 

Two 8toreys 

Victoria 4 

"The Family" 

Freddy James 

"Anderson's Revue" 
2d half 

"Around Town" 



STAB! OAHCIHB 



IBINB ACTS SOS STAB! DANCI 

Ad. Newberger 






2SS7 BBBADWAY. 
Tel. 



Jimmy Husaey Co 
Moran ft Wiser 
Geo Lyons 
Idania Tr 
"Patria" (film) 

EMPRESS (abc) 
Stanley ft Farrell 
Robaon A Beatty 
Pearls A Burns 
Manning A Lee 
Three Regals 
Robbln'a Elephants 

CleTelaad 

HIP (ubo) 
"Night Boat" 
Conroy's Models 
Julius Tanner 
Marlon Weeks 
7 Braacks 
Smith A Austin Co 
Sylvester A Vance 
Royal Oascolgnea 

PRISCILLA (sun) 
Geo Davis 
George Martin 
Vespo Duo 
Isobel 

Wellington 4 
Palm Beach Beau 
Arnold A Page 
6 Musical Hodges 
Caprice Lewis 
Lachmann 3 

MILES (loew) 
J A T Melba 
Marlon Munrfon Co 
Chester Gruber Co 
Campbell A Walker 
Golem Troupe 

Colorado Sprlnga 

ORPHEUM 

(5-8) 
(Same bill playing 

Lincoln 0-10) 
nankoff A Girlie 
Bill Prultt 
Geo Fisher Co 
Anna Chandler 
Miniature Revue 
Rena Parker 
Mario A Duffy 

Colnaebaa 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
"America First" 



Denver 

ORPHEUM 
Eddie Leonard Co 
Mabel Russell Co 
Flnke's Mules 
Morris A Campbell 
Mason A Keller Co 
Ernie Potts Co 
Irwin A Henry 

PANTAOES (p) 
Burke A Broderlck 
Mr Inquisitive 
Rucker A Winifred 
Izetta 

Senator F Murphy 
Deo ntofnea 
ORPHEUM 

(Sunday opening) 
Els A French 
Marie Fltsglbbons 
Nell O'Connell 
Grapewln A Chance 
Ilerschel Hendler 
Mme Dorla 
(One to fill) 

Detroit, Mien. 
TEMPLE (ubo) 
Apdale'e Animals 
Emma Francla Co 
Dave Roth 
"Vacuum Cleaners" 
Violet Dale 
Sophie Tucker Co 
Dooley A Rugel 
3 Alexs 

MILES (abc) 
Four Charles 
Musical Kuehns 
Symphony Girls 
Morris A Sherwood 
Weston A Young 
(One to fill) 

COLUMBIA (sun) 
Madden « 

JAR Carrlson 
The Trains 
3 Shelvey Bros 
McGee A DeVoy 
Ray Drels A F 
Helen HUdreth 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Breen Family 
Rlllsbury A Roblson 
C ft M Cleveland 
Chas Caltes Co 
Roach ft McCurdy 



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MISS CRANE 

The Oooolt Pianist 

tJ»a¥""W*PJPPBnjens»ew«ey^nnw#i 



MAHATMA 

The White Yogi 



VARIETY 



13 



Dubuque. la. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 

The Bimbos 

Davis A Kitty 

Roattino ft Shelly 

"Right Man" 

Claudia Tracey 

Mrs Eva Fay 
2d half 

Jack ft Forls 

Cbaa Olbba 

Follette ft Wicks 

Folsom ft Brown 

Coakley ft Dunlevy 

Mrs Eva Fay 

Duluth. Minn. 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Estelle Wentworth 
Whiting ft Burt 
Embs ft Alton 
Bert Leslie Co 
Rice Elmer ft T 
Mr ft Mrs G Wilde 
Linne's Dancers 

GRAND (wva) 
The Reynolds 
Senate Duo 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
t)arto ft Rialto 
Jas Thompson Co 
"Girl in Moon" 
(One to fill) 

Kaeton, pa. 

ABLE O H (ubo) 
"Fireside Revlere" 
Lazar ft Dale 
(Three to nil) 
2d half 
Cabaret Dog 
Chas Althoff 
"Dream of Orient" 
Roberts ft Barrett 
(One to fill) 

E. Liverpool, O. 

AMERICAN (sun) 
Chiyo ft Chiyo 
Baron Lichter 
Royal 4 * 
Earl's Nymphs 
Benny Lee Co 
2d half 
Orville ft Stamm 
M ft D Sollmine 
"Between Trains" 
Chip Donaldson 
Miss America 

K. St. Loots, HI. 
ERBER'S (wva) 
LaDore 

Silver ft Duval 
Chas Seamon 
Frear Baggot ft F 

2d half 
Edw Marshall 
Hays ft Lehr 
Burton Hahn A M 
Carl Roslnl Co 

Edmonton 

PANT AGES (p) 
"Swede" Hall Co 

Patricola 

."Batchelor's Dinner" 

Tabor ft Greene 

Samoya 

Elisabeth, N. J. 

' PROCTOR'S (UDO) 

2d half (1-4) 
Jolly Francis ft W 
3 Little Misses 
Emmy's Pets 
Lew Cooper Co 
Gevene Tr 

Elm Ira. If. Y. 
MAJESTIC (Ubo) 
Bob Tinney 
Gordon Eldrld Co 
Leonard ft Willard 
Mosher Hayes ft M 

(One to fill) M 
2d hair 
Garcinetti Bros 
Wilton ft Marshall 
Doc O'Neill 
"Hello Honolulu" 

■waaawllla* la*. 

GRAND (wva) 
(Terre Haute split) 
1st half 
"Clown Seal" 
Taylor ft Brown 
J C Lewis Jr Co 
Mary Melville Co 
Slatko's Rolllckers 

Fail River, Mas*. 

BIJOU (foew) 
Dancing Mars 
Lillian Watson 
Jessie Haywood Co 
Lew Hawkins 
Llpinski's Dogs 
2nd half 
Tyler ft Sinclair 
Stone ft Clear 
Dr. Joy's Sanitarium 
Billy Dale Co 
Equlllo Bros 

Farao, If. D. 

GRAND (abc) 
Prickett ft Lester 
Lyle ft Harris 
Cleora Miller 3 
Howard Martelle 
"Act Beautiful" 

2d half 
Kathleen Kla Wah Ta 
Hyatt ft Geer 



Four Lee 
Janet Allyn Co 
Hill's Circus 

Flint. Mich. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 

(Sunday opening) 

(Saginaw split) 

1st half 

"Frat Boys ft Girls" 

Ft. Doice. la. 

PRINCESS (wva) 
Bowen ft Bowen 
"Women" 
Roth ft Roberts 
Pedrini ft Monks 

2d half 
"Girl Worth While" 

Ft. Wayne. lad. 

PALACE (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
Kip ft Kippy 
Howe ft Howe 
Ruth Budd . 
"Win Garden Rev" 
Franklyn Ardell Co 
Phyllis Tr 

2d half 
Strasslers Animals 
Louis London 
Freeman Dunham Co 
"Song ft Dance Rev" 
DeVine ft Williams 
Creole Band 

Ft. William. Oat. 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
2d half (8-10) 
Blair A Crystal 
Otto Koerner Co 
Qua Erdman 
Sun Fong Lin Tr 

Galveston 

OPERA HOUSE 

(inter) 

( Same bill playing 

San Antonio 7-11) 
The Norvells 
Bernard A Scarth 
Gibson A Gulnan 
Kajlyama 
"Cranberries" 
A A F Stedman 
Dewitt Burns ft T 

FEELEY'S (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Florette 

Frazer Bunts ft H 
Capt Kldd Ashore 
Llbonetti 
The Crisps 

Gary. Ia4L 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
( Sunday only 4th) 
Melnotte Duo 
Gonne ft Albert 
Hal Stephens Co 
Hope Vernon 
"Girl in Gown Shop" 
Gr»d Rapida, Mich. 

EMPRESS (ubo) 
Harry Green Co 
Capt Anson ft D 
Santley ft Norton 
WeisBe Troupe 
Fay 2 Coley's ft F 
Weber A Diehl 
(One to fill) 

Great Falle, Moat. 

PANTAGES (p) 
(Same bill playing 

Anaconda 8) 
Mahoney A Auburn 
Elizabeth Otto 
4 Casters 
The Langdons 
Klein Bros 
Reynolds A Donegan 



■ay, 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
2d half (8-10) 
Ovonda Duo 
Hal Stephens Co 
Kane A Herman 
Dudley 3 

Hamilton. Caa. 

TEMPLE (ubo) 
Max Laube 
W A M Cutty 
Sylvester Family 
Moore A Haager 
Belle Baker Co 
French Glrla 
(One to fill) 



"Man Hunters" 
Morgan A Armstrong 

2d half 
Roeder A Dean 
Gulnan ft Gibson 
Mcintosh ft Maids 
Burns ft Kissen 
Cabaret Girl 

Haaelton, Pa. 

PALACE (loew) 
Busse's Dogs 
Ferguson ft Sunderl'd 
Chappelle ft Vldocq 
Sorority Girls 

2nd half 
Cornelia & Adele 
Archer ft Belford 
Buch Bros 
(One to fill) 

Hoboken, N. J. 

LYRIC (loew) 
Cornelia ft Adele 
Termini ft DeLler 
Archer ft Belford 
B ft H Mann 
Buch Bros 

2nd half 
Clay ft Atkins 
• Gliding O'Mearas 
Soldier's Wife 
Ferguson ft Sunder- 
land 
Sorority Girls 

Hornell. N. Y. 

SHATTUCK (ubo) 
2d half (8-10) 
Moore ft Phillips 
Montrose ft Allen 
Princeton 5 

Houston 

MAJESTIC (Inter) 
Florens Duo 
Friscoe 

Claire Vincent Co 
Josie Heather Co 
Vadie A Gygl 
Parish A Peru 
Lunette Sis 

Indianapolis 

KLITH'S (ubo) 
(Sunday Opening) 

Girl "1000 Eyes" 

Aveling A Lloyd 

"Prosperity" 

Toney ft Norman 

Louis Hardt 

Lew Holts 

Maximlllian Dogs 

Kelly A Wilder Co 
LYRIC (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 

Delmore ft Douglas 

Nelson Sisters 

"Case Sherlock" 

O'Neal ft Gallagher 

2 Black Dots 

Ithaca, N. Y. 

STAR (ubo) 
Montrose 'ft Allen 
(One to fill) . 
2d half 
Bob Tinney 
Carnival Days 

JaekaoavlUe 

ARCADE (ubo) 
(Sunday Opening) 
(Savannah Split) 
1st half 
Eddie Hill 
Helen Jackie? 
"B'way Review" 
Wm Ebs 
A ft O Terry 

Jaaeevllle, Win. 

APOLLO (abc) 
2d half (8-10) 
Prickett ft Lester 
DeBrecht Slaters 
Cushman ft Burke 
Halllgan ft Coombs 
Vaughn Sisters 



MAJESTIC (ubo) 
Alvln ft Williams 
Polishing Papa 
Hudler Stein ft P 
Will ft Kemp 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Von Cella 
Orrin ft Drew 
"Save One Oirl" 
Milton ft De Longs 

Hartford. Coaa. 

POLI'S (Ubo) 
Devoe ft Statsa 
Hal A Francis 
The Crisps 
Karl Emmy's Pets 

2d half 
Rawley A Young 
Skelly A Savaln 
James Teed Co 
Local Band 

PALACE (Ubo) 
Edwards A Louise 
Haager A Goodwin 
Green Miller A Green 



Jeraey City, If. J. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Seymour A Dupree 
Dorman A Do Glynn 
M Courtney Co 
Petticoat Minstrels 
Harry Jolson 
Lady Alice's Pets 



TOMMY HAYDN (Haydn and Haydn) will continue 
H7°. rE • 1 S n * durtII «„ u »« U»n«" of his partner. Fred. 
who la impronnf. Many thanks to kind friends for 
■rmpatbetle letter*. 

•""■"■>nsnoBnasana*aSjsaaMaHn«a*nnnaaB H a B M*M^._ 



Johaatowa, 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 

(Pittsburgh Split! 

1st half 

Flynn's Revue 

McCowan A Gordon 

Wanda 

Olga 

Frank Wilbur Co 

Kalanaaoo, Mich. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
(Lansing split) 
1st half 
Polzin Bros 
Bud Lorain 
** Serenaders 
vine A Temple 
Tennessee Ten 

Kaaaao Cltr. Mo. 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Nonet te 
"Lots of It" 
Cecile Cunningham 
Leightner A Alex 
Gautler's Toy Shop 
.^rrii Pcddea -Ca 

PANT AGES irp) 
(Sunday opening) 
Harry Hlnes 
Adonis A Dog 
Perelra 
O'Nell A Wslmesly 



Knoxvllle, Teaa. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Chattanooga Split) 
1st half 
Walron ft Zell 
Lewis A White 
Hayes A Rives 
Fern ft Davis 
Kanazawa Japs 

Kokomo, Int. 
SIPE (ubo) 

2d half (8-10) 
Mystic Hanson 3 
Emily Darrell Co 
(Three to fill) 

Lafayette, lad. 

FAMILY (ubo) 
Ross Bros 
Singing 4 
Frank Stafford Co 
Patricola ft Meyers 
Strassler's Animals 

2d half 
The Rrightons 
Pauline Saxon 
Mlddleton A Spell- 

meyer 
Wm Armstrong Co 
7 Colonial Belles 

Lancaster, Pa. 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Mons Herbert 
Georgette A Capltola 
Fields ft Bernie 
"Board School Girls" 

Lansing. Mich. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
(Kalamazoo split) 
1st half 
Lavine ft Inman 
L ft M Hunting 
Gaylord ft Lancton 
Mack ft Earl 
"Sept Morn" 

Lima. 

ORPHEUM (sun) 
"Jr Follies" 

2d half 
The Doughertys 
"Maids of KUlarney" 
Elsie Mainea 
5 of Clubs 

Lincoln 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
The Woodwards 
Barber A Jackson 
Howard ft Fields 
Frank Ward 
Merlan's Canines 
LYRIC (wva) 
Cross ft Doris 



Lowell, Mass. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
(This Week 20) 

E E Clive Co 

M ft B Hart 

Wm Slsto 

•Fashion Show" 

Flying Mayos 

Simpson b. Deane 

Musette 

Macon, Ga. 

GR\ND (ubo) 
(Atlanta Split) 
1st half 
Stuart Darrow 
Violin Girls 
Eddie Dowling 
Le Roy ft Paul 
(One to fill) 



ORPHEUM (wva) 
Heras ft Preston 
Fields Keane ft W 
Princess Kalama Co 
Sllber ft North 
"Magazine Glrla" 

2d half 
"Four Husbands" 

Manchester. If. B, 

PALACE (ubo) 
Florette 

Kahl Walton ft H 
"Drifting" 
Wm Slsto 
The Miracle 

2d half 
Binns A Burt 
Thornton A Thornton 
5 Girls 

Layton A Kennedy 
Murphy Nochols Co 



BIJOU (ubo) 
2d half (8-10) 
The Nelloa 
Bell A Bell 
Oden A Holland 



LYRIC (ubo) 
Mabel A LeRoy Hart 
Florence Lorraine Co 

2d halt 
Electrical Venus 
(One to fill) 

Marshaltown, la. 

CASINO (abc) 
2d half (8-10) 
Tom Brantford 
Donlta A Pymerone 
McGreevy A Doyle 
Anna Eva Fay 



lae Profsssioaals' Original Horns 

CONTINENTAL HOTEL 

LOS ANGELES aad SAN FRANCISCO 
Shaalsr and Fumsss N ~Flftv-FUtv' , 



Raskin's Russians 

2d half 
Cerbo 
Chas Hendrlz Co 

Little Rock, Ark. 

MAJESTIC (inter) 
Monroe Bros 
Dickinson A Deagon 
Leroy A Harvey 
McKay A Ardine 
Chief Caupolloan 

2d half 
Leo Zarrell Co 
Josephine Davia 
Lew Madden Co 
G Van Dyke A Bro 
Harry Girard Co 

Loaaa ea o r t, lad. 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
Pauline Saxon 
Three Ankers 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Transfleld Sisters 
Howe A Howe 
Richard Wally Co 

Loadoa, Caa. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
Scarploff A Verada 
Pictures 

Loo Aagoloa 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Rooney A Bent 
Donohuc A Stewart 
Burdella Patterson 
JAW Hennlng 
"Age of Reason" 
Muriel Worth Co 
Mayo A Tally 
Clayton White Co 

PANTAGES (p) 
Willard BroB 
What 4? 

Corelll & Gillette 
Military Maids 
Herbert Brooks Co 

LoalsvtUe 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
(Sunday ^Opening) 
Eddie Foy Co 
J C Nugent Co 
4 Danubes 
Brown Harris A B 
Rnt» F TMl . 
Frank- LiDeut 
(One to fill) 



City. la. 

REGENT (wva) 
Volente Bros 

2d half 
"Maid to Order" 
CECIL (abc) 
Whitney's Dolls 
McGreevy A Doyle 

2d half 
Mlmio 4 
Trolley Car Duo 



FAMILY (ubo) 
Bob Dalley Go 
Yates A Wheeler 
CAA Wllkens 
Alex Bros 
Von Cello 

2nd half 
Adams A Guhl 
Dolly Morrlssey 
Will A Kemp 
Julia Edwards 
(One to fill) 



ORPHEUM 
(All acts on this bill 

playing first time In 

Memphis) 
"Bride Shop" 
Diamond A Brennan 
Mulen A Coogan 
Raymond Bond Co 
Sherman A Uttry 
Alice L Doll 
"Patrla" (film) 

Mllwankee 

MAJESTIC (orpb) 
"Forest Fire" 
Mllllcent Mower 
Lovenberg Sis Co 
Whitfield A Ireland 
A us Crelghtons 
Ward A Cullen 
Thlesen's Dogs 
PALACE (wva) 

(Sunday opening.) 
"Four Husbands" 
Bob Hall 
Two Blondlea 

2d half 
GAL Garden 
Fields Keane A W 
Herman Lieb Co 
B«* Ha!) 

■ "Mtgazrla* Qirla" 
(One to fill) 



Mlaaeaaolla 

ORPHEUM 
Clara Morton Co 
The Casinos 
"The Cure" 
Halllgan A Sykes 
Haydn A Haydn 
Wheeler A Dolan 

PALACE (wv») 
Alfretta 8 latere 
Lew Hoffman 
Chas Mack Co 
Barry Girls 
"Revue DeVogue" 

PANTAGES (p) 
Tuscano Bros 

(Sunday opening) 
Tuscano Bros 
Bernard A Meyers 
Niblo's Birds 
Phalero Circus 
Florence Moore 
Jue Quon Tal 
James Grady Co 

UNIQUE (abc) 
The Karuzos 
Kathleen Kla Wah Ta 
Mr A Mrs Arthur Don 
LaFrance Bros 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
McNeil A Maye 
Davis A Moore 
Prewett-Merrill Co 
Howard Martelle 
"Act Beautiful" 

Montreal 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Terada Japs 
"Pinkie" 
Kennedy A Burt 
Pietro 

Mayhew A Taylor 
Clark A Verdi 
Folies D'Amour 
(One to AH) 

FRANCIA8 (ubo) 
(Ottawa split) 
1st half 
Clifton A Goes 
Noha A Phillips 
J G Sparks Co 
TAB Moore 
Yamato Bros 

Mooae Jaw. Can. 

ALLAN (wva) 

( Same bill playing 

Swift Current 8) 
Gallernl • Sisters 
Holmes A Wells 
Flo Adler Boys 
Delton Mareeno A D 



HOWATSON and SWAYBELL 

•A Case of Pickle*" LAUGH BROKERS 



E. HEMMENDINGER^ft^.V 

Ta. §71 less Jsaekri ts the 



Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (Ubo) 
2d halt (1-4) 
Symonds A Bradley 
Burns A Foran 
8am Llebert Co 
Warren A Coaler 
Col Jaok George 
Meroedes 

Mnakeaon, Mich. 
REGENT (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
Mystic Hanson 3 
Jura 

Rawson A Clare 
John P Reed 
"School Days" 
2d half 
"Night Clerk" 

Oak Park, III. 
OAK PARK (wva) 
Crossmans Enter 

Nashville. Teain. 

PRINCESS (ubo) 
(Birmingham Split) 
1st half 

3 Bobs 

Schoen A Mayne 

"Petticoats" 

Al Herman 

Germalne 3 

Newark, N. J.. 

PROCTOR'S (ubof 
2d halt (1-4) 
Ella La Vale 
Comfort A King , 
Rose Lehart Cc 

MAJESTIC (loew) 
3 Daring Sisters 
Brandell A Bell 
Miller A Vincent 
Mercedes Clark Co 
Nat Carr 
Tlerney 4 

2nd half 
3 Norrle Sisters 
Armstrong A Strauss 
Alice Cole 
Frank Whlttler Cn 
Bell Boy .1 
.loeephus Tr 

Now Havea, Coaa. 

POLI'S (Ubo) 
Holden A Graham 
Rowley A Young 
Shell/ A Savaln 
The Immigrant 
Forster A Lovett 
Billle Reeves Co 

2d half 
Bally Hoo 8 
El Cot© 

"Just 4 Instance" 
The Crisps 
City 4 
H * . '.Mynteiim 

BIJOU (Ubo) 
3 Jeanettee 
J A A Francla 
Sinclair A Casper 
HlrchofTs Oypsles 

(One to fill) 



2d half 
Rlkoma 
Local 

Dixie Boys 
Granville A Mack 
Karl Emy'a Pets 

New Leadoa, Co 

LYCEUM (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Do Ardmo 
Florence Shirley 
HAS Conley 
Hill A Ecker 
Hip 4 

New Roehelle, N Y 

LOEW 
3 Creighton Girls 
Gould A Lewis 
Armstrong A Ford 

2nd half 
Brandt A Aubrey 
Chase A LaTour 
Storm A Marsdi-n 

Norfolk, Va. 

ACADEMY (ubo) 
(Richmond Split) 
1st half 
Dufty A Daisy 
Leo Beers 
Chung Wha 4 

(One to fill) 

Oakland. Cal. 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 

Orville Harrold 

Creasy A Dayne 

Aileen Stanley 

Adair A Adelphl 

Myrl A Delmar 

Trovato 

Harry L Mason 

Wallace Galvln 
PANTAGES (P) 

Sterling A Marguerite 

Joe Roberta 

La Scala 6 

La Malre A Dawson 

Winston's Sea Liona 

Osdea, Utah 
PANTAGES (P) 
(8-10) s 
"BetUng Bettys* 
Olive Briscoe 
Bell Ringers 
Smith A Kaufman 
Slgbee's Dogs 



Oi 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Carua A Comer 
Savoy A Brennan 
5 Belgium Glrla 
Newhoff A Phelpa 
"Double Exposure" 
"Girl of Delhi" 

EMPRESS (wva) 
Harold A Yates 
Csthryn Chaloner Co 
Cervo 
Chaa Hendrlx Co 

2d half 
Volente Bros 
Howards A Field 
Cross A Dorla 
Howard'a Bears 

Oahkoah. Wis. 

MAJE8TIC (wva) 
Teddy A May 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Kip A Kippy 
Cleveland A Dowrey 



Ottawa, Caa. 

DOMINION (ubo) 
(Montreal split) 
1st half 
"Memories" 
Conlln Parks 3 
Flying Venus 
(Two to fill) 

Passaic, N. J. 
2d half (1-4) 
10 Dark Nights 
3 Romans 

Noodles Pagan • 

Walton A Dalberg 
Stewart Sisters 
Jimmy Reynolds 

Pateraoa, N. J. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Lew Cooper Co 
Sam Dody 
Loughlln A West 
3 RIanoa 
Billy Klnkald 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

SCENIC (Ubo) 
Xylo Maids 
Zeno A Mandel 
Leightona 
Mysterious Will 
2d half 
Blanche Sloan 
Grace De Winters 
Elinors A Carlton 
Melody 6 

Philadelphia 
KEITH'S (ubo) 
Ruth St Denis Co 
"Rubevllle" 
McCarty A Faye 
Adams A Murray 
BUI Morrtsa#-v 
FlaviUo 
Rotter Bros 
"Pstrla" tfllm) 
WM PENN (ubo) 
(This Week 29) 
The Crisps 
Jolly Wild A F 

Continued 



Arthur Lcvlne Co 
Espe A Duttou 
Alice Nelson Co 
Lloyd & lixlll 
"Maids of Phillio" 
Fox A Ingraham 
ALLEGHENY (ubo) 

(This Week 20) 
"Wanted a Wife" 
Eddie Carr Co 
Coxey'a Army 
Parillo A Frabito 

GRAND (ubo) 
Kerslake's Pigs 
Lillian Fitzgerald 
"Savannah. Ga" 
"Wanted a Wife" 
"Jack Marley" 
Koban Japs 

Pittsburgh 

1IAHK1S (ubo) 
Ed Estus 
Wm Browning 
Tiller Sisters 
Anderson A Evans 
Roselle Winston 3 
"Surprise Party" 
Rogers A Hart 
Aerial Mitchells 

DAVIS (ubo) 
Edna Goodrich Co 
Avon Comedy 4 
W H Wakefield 
Hickey Bros 
Annette Asorla Co 
Daisy Leon 
Lord A Fuller 

(One to fill) 
SHERIDAN SQ (ubo) 
(Johnstown Split) 
1st half 
Frank Mullane 
S Charters Co 
Georgette A Capltola 

(Two to fill) 

Fit tan eld, Mass. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
"Holllday in Dixie" 
Sam Harrla 
Payne A Nesbit 

Portland, Me. 

_ KEITH'S (ubo) 
B B Cllve Co 
Musette 
Imp Chlnose 2 
Hufford A Chain 
Walters A Cliff Sis 
Lamb A Morton 
MeeLan 3 Dogs 

PortL.d. Ore. 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 

Beatrice Harford 

Nordstrom A Plnkham 

Ames A Winthrop 

Mile Leltsel 

Haruko Onukl 

Hans Hanke 

Rlggs A Wltchle 
PANTAGES (p) 

Raymond 

Jubilee 4 

Herbert A Dennla 

"Red Heads" 

Vera Mercereau Co 

Providence, R. L 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
"Girlies Gambol" 
Will Oakland Co 
Roland Travers Co 
Dunbar's Darkles 
McShane A Hathaway 
Joe Towle 
Dunedln Duo 
(One to fill) 

EMERY (loaw) 
Carbray Bros 
Harry First Co 
Mabel Harper 
"Top of Andes" 
(One to fill) 

2nd half 
Williams A Segnl 
"Harmless Bug" 
Grlndell A Esther 
Adrian 
(One to fill) 



Heading, P a . 

-, HIP (ubo) 
O'Neill Sisters 
Wood A Mandervllle 
Robert A Barett 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
"Camp In Rockies" 
Laser A Dale 
"Fireside Reverie" 
Hudler Stoln A P 

Klrhmond, Ind. 

MURRAY (ubo) 
Pictures 

2d half 
Mabel A LeRoy Hart 
Adolpho 

"Miss America" 
(Two to fill) 

Richmond, Va. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Norfolk Split) 
1st half 
Brennan A Powell 
"At The Party" 
Pert Hanlon 
»V0l. Wurd HirW. 
(One Co nil) 

Roanoke, Ta, 

ROANOKB (ubo) 
(Charlotte Split) 
1st half 
Hawaiian Duo 

on page 28.) 



14 



NEW ACTS THIS WEEK 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, First Appearance 

or Reappearance in or Arovnd 

New York 

Mile. Daxie and Co., Palace. 
Nolan and Nolan, Colonial. 
Frankie Rice, Alhambra. 
Bancroft and Broike (new act), Royal 
Minerva Courtney (new act), Royal 
"Dixie,- Royal. 
"Paris Fashion Shop," American (1st 

half). 

Emily Ann Wellman and Co. (5). 
"Young Mrs. Stanford" (Melodramatic). 
20 Mins.; Full Stage (Parlor) (Spadal 

Lighting Effects). 
Palace. 

Edward Eisner wrote and staged 
"Young Mrs. Stanford/' called on the 
Palace program "A Flash Drama." It's 
a melodrama of the triangle, but the 
story is the least, since the success of 
the play lies entirely in the manner of 
presentation. This is on the style of a 
moving picture, that illusion aided by 
screen captions thrown upon a flimsy 
substance hung in "one" unless that 
be thrown wholly by the picture ma- 
chine which is possible, as it is a dis- 
solve of a kind. The rear of the par- 
lor set has a black curtain, which, with 
the light screen or scrtaain front, gives 
an inky darkness to the stage. . As the 
characters appear or meet, a spot light 
glow from either side of the wings as 
occasion demands is thrown upon tnem, 
with the audience only seeing those 
within the blade of l?ght The lighting 
effects make the act. Thev are so Ins 

Jortant to it the electricians carried, 
ack Meyers and Harold Spielberg, are 
mentioned in the billing. Russell Par- 
ker is also listed, as the stage manager. 
Young Mrs. Stanford (Miss Wellman) 
has a husband, and secretary. The lat- 
ter followed the husband to Philadel- 
phia the night before and reported to 
Mrs. San ford as the scene, opened, that 
he registered under an assumed name 
in a hotel there, with Mrs. Langdon. a 
friend of the Stanford family, as his 
companion. The husband is informed 
bv his valet of the secretary's spying. 
When meeting his wife, to be accused 
of unfaithfulness, he invents a story 
that pacifies her for the moment, but 
the husband insists, after promising to 
leave the next dsv with his wife for a 
six months' vacation, that she receive 
Mr. and Mrs. Langdon for dinner that 
evening. Mrs. Stanford assents to this 
and the Lancdons arrive. During the 
visit Mr. Standford and Mrs. Langdon 
intrigue through notes left in the wom- 
an's cloak pocket to elope that night. 
These notes are secured by the secre- 
tary, who reveals their contents to 
Mrs. Stanford. She orders Langdon 
out of the house, and Mr. Langdon, 
demanding to know the cause of that 
action, is informed by Mrs. Stanford 
his wife came there that night to meet 
her lover, but insists Langdon shall 
oblige his wife to name him. Mrs. 
Stanford will not. Langdon exits to 
the room his wife has entered, and af- 
ter a shot is heard, returns to say he 
has killed her and will kill the lover as 
soon as he learns who he is. Stanford, 
moaning over the loss of his mistress, 
hears his wife declare to Langdon he 
will never find that out, as the final 
flash of the picture machine caption 
reads "The End." It's a unique vaude- 
ville sketch, mostlv interesting because 
of that, and well plaved. with Miss 
Wellman. on her vaudeville debut in 
this plavlet. leading her very good com- 
pany. Skrtfhe.s like, this strike vande,- 
rllle so seldom iKkv TiYt hard. Vaude- 
ville can not afford to lose "Young Mrs. 
Stanford." for it would be quickly 
taken anywhere as a curtain raiser in 
the legit. Sim. 



8am Liebert and Co. (3). 

"A Shattered Idol" (Comedy-Drama). 

34 Mins.; Fntt 8tage (Interior), 

Fifth Ave. 

Sam Liebert, judging from the dialog, 
has had god monolog lines pieced to- 
gether and a story interwoven, present- 
ing it under the title of "A Shattered 
Idol." There are many faults with the 
sketch and as many with the company 
in it. The piece is too long, too talky, 
and there are about three anti-climaxes, 
at any ane of which the sketch might 
end. Tie audience laughed at it fat 
times if the wrong place, rather the 
fault of the actors). A middle-aged 
Hebrew amassed a small fortune in the 
cigar making business, and invested it 
in picture producing, and got a real 
fortune. Ginsberg, the ex-cigarman's 
name, sent his daughter, Sadie, to Vas- 
sar. The sketch opens on 'the morn- 
ing of the girl's 18th birthday, and 
she is expected home. Their sweet 
child turns out to be a very much mod- 
ernized young woman, to whom both 
mother and father appear old fashioned. 
She informs them of it, incidentally 
turning down her former suitor, now 
a successful song writer. The father 
finally upbraids the girl and shows her 
the door, but before she has time to 
leave, the phone rings and the elder 
Ginsberg is informea he is a pauper. 
The film company has busted. Then 
the daughter offers to go to work for 
the family. In the midst of the happy 
reunion, the rejected suitor enters, and 
says Cohan & Harris have accepted his 
new musical comedy and exhibits a 
check for $1,000. Sadie accepts him, 
after which he states the message re- 

farding the film failure was a joke and 
e the joker. The young people clinch 
and retire-'and then father and mother 
sit on the $150 couch and a couple of 



Pierre Pelletier and Co. (2). 

"Oh What a Night" (Comedy-Drama). 

14 Mins,; Five (Interior). 

23rd Street 

'this comedy-dramatic playlet is aiiite 
all right in its way, excepting it is about 
five years late. The day of the "sur- 
prise finish burglar sketch has been 
done in so many forms, audiences are 
not surprised now. In this instance it 
takes the form of a young wife being 
aroused in the middle of the night by a 
noise. She resides in the country. Her 
husband is expected home on a train 
due after 2 a. m. 'She yells 'for help. 
From the road there comes a response. 
A man enters, says he's the proprietor 
of the hotel a short distance away. He 
helps search for the burglar, but no 
trace. Wife, nervous, begs man to staw 
till hubby arrives and promptly reveals 
the location of all the jewels and sil- 
verware. Meantime husband has wan- 
dered in and out, intoxicated, but un- 
noticed by the others. Then ensues 
half a dozen twists, in which you are 
led one moment to believe the stranger 
is the burglar and then again he isn't 
The deception could be continued for 
hours, each time by a single twist in the 
dialog. The roles of the wife and the 
burglar were well played, but that of 
the intoxicated husband wasn't. 

Jolo. 



NEW SHOWS NEXT WEEK 



Arthur Pranklyn and Co. (2). 
•15 Mins.; Two (Special). 
City. 

This turn is evidently designed for 
small time consumption. In- that class 
it will go along nicely, when a little 
more comedy is iniected, and the boy 
plaving the juvenile secures a song 
within his vocal capabilities. The scene 
is in front of a small country general 



PROTECTED MATERIAL 

VARIETY'S Protected Material Department will receive and file all letters addressed 
to It. The eavetopet are to be sealed apoa the back io a manner to prevent opening with- 
out detection, tjalets by permission of the owner of the letter. 

It Is suggested all letters be regist ered, addressed to Protected Material, VARIETY. 
New York, and receipt requested. VARIETY will acknowledge each letter received. 

Poll pa rtlcnlars off the "Protected Material Department" were published on Psge 5 in 
VARTETYof Feb. 4. Mi. 

The following circuits, managements and agencies hsve signified a willingness to sdopt 
such means as may be within their power to eliminate "lifted msteri sl" fr om their thestres, 
hen Informed <ff the result of sn investiesrion conducted by VARIETY 
...-_ -^ — ._ — BERT LEVEY ORCUIT 



MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 
Cos. M. Schenck ) 
FOE CIRCUIT 
(Edgar A nea) 
MILES CIRCUIT 
(Walter F. Keef e) 
FENN-HEIMAN CIRCUIT 
(Sam Ksan _.._ 
RICKARDS CIRCUIT (Australia) 
^^^^^^(Chria_O^Brown_^^^^ 



^J* 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 
_^_ (Wslter F. Keefe) 

SHEA CIRCUIT B. S. MOSS CIRCUIT 

(Ha rry A . Shea) (B. S Moss) 

FEIBER'SHEA CIRCUIT GUS SUN CIRCUIT 

(Rtchsrd Kearney) (Gus Sun) 

aloz cntcurr mich. vaudeville circuit 

a. H. Alos) (W. S. Butterfield) 

U. & V. M. A. 
(Wslter J. PHmmer) 



minutes additional time are killed by 
Ginsberg's comedy. Mrs. Ginsberg 
and the juvenile are contributed the 
best hearing. The girl in an unsympa- 
thetic role, is not good. Liebert as 
Ginsberg did well enough when speak- 
ing comedy lines, but failed to impress 
with heavy drama. 'The Shattered 
Idol" will answer on the small time and 
perhaps some of the smaller big timers, 
after about 10 minutes have been taken 
out of it. Fred. 



Niobe. 

Diving Act. 

Pull Stage. 

Harlem O. H. 

Niobe is a plump gM, attractive of 
face and figure, who does the regula- 
tion "tank" act and attempts a novelty 
in the singing of a song while sub- 
merged. This feat is made possible by 
the use of a device resembling a minia- 
ture diving bell. This contrivance looks 
much like a metal helmet, but by means 
of it the vibrations of the girl's voice 
are made vaguely audible in the thea- 
tre. The feat got only mild attention 
at the Harlem theatre. With the diver 
is a young man lecturer, whose talk 
adds much to the turn. Jt was due 
tarpely to his methoir o-f silvery that 
the threadbare business of holding a 
watch on the time the girl held her 
breath was put over. The turn is an 
interesting small timer. 



store, conducted by an aged Civil War 
veteran and his grand-daughter. The 
juvenile is the sweetheart of the girl, 
a member of the militia and has been 
called to his regiment for service on the 
border. The action centers about the 
old man denying his consent to the 
wedding of the two. The vet offers 
the description of one of the battles in 
which he fought, in a semi-recitative 
manner, but it does not get over. For 
the finale the boy marches off with 
his company to the strains of "Yankee 
Doodle," with the veteran making a 
heroic effort to get his rheumatic limbs 
to answer to the martial feeling in his 
breast as he also flings his old knap- 
sack over and swings his rifle to his 
shoulder. It is a red fire finish that 
wins applause. Fred. 



Hall, Ellsworth and Merrick. 

Songs. 

10 Mins.; One. 

American Roof. 

Three men dress suited doing pub- 
lished ballads and rags. The routine 
works out in the same fashion as with 
innumerable other trios. The individ- 
ual singing suffices, but collectively the 
men #ct little harmonv, The rags are. 
used 'to betrei advantage" than the bal- 
lads, the boys putting the former over 
with snap. For an early spot on a 
small time bill this trio may have a 
chance. 




-The dreit Divide * (Revival), Ly- 
ceum (Feb. 5). 

"A Successful Calamity," Booth 
(Feb. 5). 

"Canary Cottage," Morosco (Feb. 5). 

"Lilac Time,"Republic (Feb. 6). 

'You're in Love," Casino (Feb. 6). 



«o 



LONDON BELLES. 

Rose Sydell, for man? year* a standard 
box office card In burlesque. Is piloting around 
the Columbia circuit what Is probably the 
poorest specimen of modern burlesque seen 
on that wheel this season. 

Aside from the principal's name, the ward- 
robe and scenic Investiture, there Isn't one 
redeeming feature about the "London Belles" 
to warrant Its position In high class burlesque. 

Johnnie Weber Is the active principal, 
amusing st times, but generally working 
along seml-suggestlve lines, continually reach- 
ing for the double entendre for his laughs and 
occasionally leaping over the common bounds 
of decency to hold up a "bit" or scene. Weber 
has for years maintained a reputation for 
his calibre of "fun" and seems at his best 
when wallowing around In the ancient brand 
of burlesque comedy, but this week he was 
plainly under wraps, perhaps because of the 
rigid censorship maintained at the Columbia, 
and under those wraps, Weber was not the 
usual Weber. 

The entire opening scene In which a bur- 
lesque show usually gets in motion, was 
about the most stupid, meaningless and laugh- 
less concoction of gab and song ever staged 
In a similar production. The second scene 
was in "one" an* the third, the train sbed of 
a railroad station, was the single redeeming 
portion of this department Properly handled 
this scene could be developed into something 
worth while. 

The entire first psrt ran along slowly and 
with but a flash of real worth here and there, 
the numbers failing to score with any notle- 
able degree. The musical score suffered 
through the absence of a real voice In the 
line-up. and the chorus failed to help out to 
any extent for the producer baa Shown little 
Judgment In his selection of girls. They do 
not reach the beauty class and their efforts at 
harmony were extremely painful. 

The construction of the show brought out 
an olio with the majority of the principals 
participating. Frances Cornell opened this 
department with a routine of numbers. Miss 
Cornell Is English, tall and rather heavy but 
withal a good type for burlesque. She did 
fairly well. Lew Thall who plays a Heberw 
role In the show told several stories and of- 
fered a few parodies, getting a reasonable 
applause reward for his "bit" Campbell and 
Weber with their familiar "Oh Papa" specialty 
In which the chorus Is utilized for a series 
of living pictures, earned the hit of this end, 
but the Columbia censor certainly overlooked 
a considerable portion of the "blue" In their 
turn. What a pretty sight to see Weber 
spitting food In Campbell's face? 

Two other specialties were offered during the 
action of the show, Smith and Pullman work- 
ing in the first and the Gayety Trio In the 
second. The former team deserves the palm 
for genuine ability and the nifty reception 
tendered Kate Pullman was fully deserved. 
This girl worked like a beaver continually, 
danced to an even dozen encores and stood out 
as one of the two genuinely good things In 
the whole affair. The other was Ward Caul- 
field who essayed the Celtic role In both parts. 
Caulfleld was clean in his efforts and while 
not given the opportunity that Weber has, 
made his every attempt tell wWh real results. 
The Oayety Trio composed of two men snd a 
woman, suggested the burlesque of yesteryear. 
They finished with the callope song which tells 
a vocal story In Itself. 

The burlesque was short and slow and 
carried one number that should be promptly 
relegated to the ash can. "Can I Depend On 
That." approaches the "raw" too close to be 
allowed In. And "Old Man's Darling" might 
be dropped as well. When a tiumner leader 
goes after the audience for results something 
is wrong either with the singer or the song. 
It's the song here. 

Rose Sydell appeared herself at the finale 
of the opener, her introduction taking place 
in a rather novel scene with a lyrical desire 
to be remembered as Queen of Burlesque. The 
song carries a combination of sentiment and 
truth, timely and right, but if Miss Sydell 
wishes to be remembered to the current 
Reason's audiences as Queen of Burlesque she 
had better bolster up this outfit, rt's weak, 
morally and otherwise. Wynn. 



MUTT AND JEFFS WEDDING. 

(INTERNATIONAL) 

Mutt Harry B. Kav 

■ Tofr Gus. Alexander 

Chnrllr Cash Alden McClanklne 

Frank Rubber Robert H. Wilson 

Paspale Salami Edward Connelly 

Sadie Castile Rita Abbott 

Gloria Castile, her aunt Eugene Dingen 

T.ucotte Roundhcart Minnie Palmer 

Justice of the Peace Frank MrCullough 

Dora Dare, an adventuress Dornthv Ftnv 

F!P. T»T«i*ii«-nio Ksrulft'tl 

Z<maa; .' .■;■.; Julia Carter 

Twynette. . 1 - „ . „, „,„,,, f • .Kathleen Fleming 
Phvllas. . . . Jdanrlng girls j gte]Ia Braa8( , 

Wbntever the quality of the entertainment 
the "Mutt and Jeff" title on the billboards is 
undoubtedly a potent attraction at the box 



3=x: 



SHOW REVIEWS 



15 



office. Last week It brought capacity aridlences 
to the Bronx theatre, where capacity audi- 
ence* have been rare since the International 
assumed occupancy. 

Friday night was a turnaway In the upper 
parta of the house, while the lower floor was 
hilled all but a few scattered seats In the rear. 
The audience waa a particularly responsive 
one for the style of loud fun and slapstick 
furnished by Qua Hill organisation. The 
comedy is the most elemental sort of horse- 
play. In one act, the second of the three, 
was packed all the rough house business that 
the burlesque shows depend upon In a pinch. 
There waa a double table scene that lasted over 
ten minutes with accompaniment of much 
messy throwing about of food ; there was also 
unlimited assault and battery of little Jeff 
with a slapstick, drinking of cocktails by 
Mutt's wife and finally a general melee In 
which everybody asaaulted everybody else with 
a horsewhip. 

Not very fine entertainment, to be sure, but 
the Hill judgment was justified when the audi- 
ence laughed itself sick. The same test ap- 
plied to the whole show vindicates the pro- 
ducers. The chorus of 16 could not last a 
week in an American Wheel burlesque show, 
either for their stage deportment or their 
singing, but the Bronx audience hailed them 
with enthusiasm. The dressing both of prin- 
cipals and chorus could never get past on 
the Wheels. The choristers have only three 
changes, one for each act. 

The members individually and as an or- 
ganisation, are better than the material. Of 
the men, of course all the fun la handled by 
Mutt and Jeff (Harry B. Kay and Qus Alex- 
ander respectively). Their bits were made to 
order of the familiar characters in the Bud 
Fisher cartoons, and the audience was ready 
in advance to laugh. The other men prin- 
cipals made up a first rate singing quartet — 
Alden MuClaskie, Robert H. vVUson, Edward 
Connelly and Frank McCul lough, who from 
time to time led numbers, published songs all 
of them and selected out of the list now in 
vogue. 

Of the women Rita Abbott and Dora Btoy 
did best with their songs, the other two women 
being present only for comedy purposes 
(Eugenia Dlngen and Minnie Palmer). Miss 
Palmer did nicely with a tipsy song In the 
second act, but had little else. 

The three sets made a tremendous flash, but 
the cost could not have been heavy. How- 
ever, they served their purpose of furnishing 
■ a gay background for what the Bronx crowd 
voted a good show. 



PALACE. 

Eva Tanguay and a good show filled the 
Palace Monday night, when It looked before 
show time, with the steady rain from the late 
afternoon, aa though llg-t business might 
result. 

The bill around the headline waa not alone 
a good one. but, Including Tanguay, was 
quite expensive, even with an act short, re- 
placed by the "Patria" aerial film closing the 
t performance. The gross salaries at the Palace 
this week must foot up more than the aver- 
age amount, alwaya a large one for the pro- 
grama of that. theatre. 

Miss Tanguay waa one of the three distinct 
hits, each scoring in Its own way. The others 
were the Four Marx Brothers, for the com- 
edy, and Emily Ann Wellman and Co. (New 
Acta) In a sketch. 

The ever-youthful Tanguay came back to 
New York, in a double sense, with some new 
songs and costumes. Both were along the ac- 
cepted Tanguay style, and all given before 
an attractive new house drop the Palace pro- 
vided. About the newest thing Tanguay did 
was to dance in different styles, hard shoe, 
buck and wing and a suggestion of the old 
statue clog. In lyric Eva admitted she didn't 
profess to ossss with other dancers of note, 
but her stepping surprised the audience and 
waa greeted aa readily as though she de- 
pended upon that for her specialty. Tanguay's 
opening number In a costume of all white 
plumes, hat Included, waa "How Do Tou Do?" 
with the next about what a suit of clothes will 
do, then "A Regiment of Tanguays" and "Old 
New York," with the dance coming in, to be 
followed by "Every Day Is Thanksgiving" 
and "Humanity," a recitation, afterward, 
when "I Don't Care" to close waa perioded 
with a speech. This "come back" of Tan- 
guay's adds another remarkable chapter In 
|ier miraculous vaudeville career. 

The Marx Brothers In their "Home Again" 
tabloid, running 40 minutes, have In this en- 
gagement a return Palace date and that they 
were a laughing riot with the house merely 
proves what their first appearance said, that 
they have the best tabloid for value in vaude- 
ville. That the Palace audience approved of 
them so thoroughly on the second visit also in- 
dicated that thd return trip helped to denote 
the difference between this Marx tab and the 
others which have preceded it. with the com* 
parlson altogether In favor of the Marx's, for 
"Home Again" haa all the others have In 
mounting, dressing and people, besides real 
comedy (which the others had not). As an 
all-around entertainment, the Marx' boys are so 
far In the lead they will go a long while 
without being paced, for the very simple rea- 
son that In the four versatile Marx brothers, 
the act has four Individual entertaining stars. 
Mrs. Minnie Palmer, their mother (who looks 
more like their sister), living home, now in 
Chicago, can feel the mother's pride that she 
brouRfct un fcur Rsod b-nys who have made 
gooa as welt 

The Marx act for the night show shifted 
positions from the matinee running with Le 
Roy, Talma and Bosco, the latter going Into 
No. 3, and the big act opening after Intermis- 
sion. The magicians cut down their turn to 
25 minutes (coming In from the road, where 



they were giving a foil show), putting all 
of their best tricks in this time and mailing 
a regular act out of It. The redueed time 
also brought out more fully some of the ex- 
cellent diaappearancea or Illusions ag\d magio 
the three-act can do. In 25 minutes it'p very 
interesting. 

Stuart Barnes had the "No. 4" spot, in bis 
singing monolog, talking about suffrage, mar- 
riage and incidentally, while singing "Grow 
Older" and doing hie ''boob" ohartetcr of asms 
length for the finish. There are Intermittent 
bright flashes In the Barnes talk, but be does 
the beat with the "boob" bit, and had a 
couple of women almost brassing up his sot 
through laughing at him. 

The show waa opened* (after the Weekly 
Pictorial) by Alf Loyal'a dog sot. In which s 
French poodle does the best acrobstlo trick 
an animal has ever performed upon the stage. 
It la s back turn or somersault from a run- 
way to a mat, the dog covering about 12 feet 
in the opening and making a complete turn. 
Thlo trick Is purely s matter of training. It 
oould not but be noticed also that the dog did 
the trick often without urging. The opening 
of the turn la mild alongside the big trick 
and the throwing of knives for the asms dog 
to catch could be dropped, alnos the animal 
did it well enough with the oranges. The 
suggestion of the knives possibly cutting the 
dog isn't pleasant to contemplate from the 
front. There la a woman assistant, who has 
the Continental Idea of dressing to rids a 
bicycle, on top of which the dog Is stationed 
while catching the thrown artleles. A "dead" 
bit by the same poodle was another bit of ex- 
cellent training. The leaping somersault 
should be preceded with a card announce- 
ment and worked up for s big effect with the 
first try. Its too good to be given In the 
matter-of-fact manner now being done, and. 
In fact, that trick la the whole act, for It will 
keep the Alf Loyal'a dog turn on the big time. 
Mignon waa second, very light for the spot 
and getting about what should have been ex- 
pected with her imitations, announced as 
"alight Impressions." They are very alight 



COLONIAL 

The Colonial haa what la termed a Mid- 
winter Carnival this week, consisting of ten 
acta and the aerial, "Patria." The Monday 
night (rain) business filled the house from 
top to bottom. The crowd was so large a 
certain share of the gallery element got Into 
the first balcony and, being unrestrained, 
made life miserable for the people around. 

Frank Bhlelda, a roper, opened after a news 
weekly. Shields makes capital use of the 
lariat. The Boudlnl Bros.. No. 2, with ac- 
cordions, did nicely with both classical and 
popular selections. The men follow the usual 
path of musicians of this order. Should they 
eliminate a bit of their ataginess it would be 
beneficial. 

James C. Morton, assisted by Mamie Dia- 
mond, brought forth the first lsughs of the 
evening. Morton la ualng about the aame act 
as when with Frank Moore, Through Mortons 
hard work the act went over handily. Florrte 
Mlllershlp, with a dainty song offering, fol- 
lowed with success from the start. Miss Mlll- 
ershlp has selected acme fitting numbers, 
which, together with her personality, places 
her In the likable single class. 

An Interesting Item was James J. Cortst* 
with otorlea of his pugillatlo career. Bach 
Corbett story haa a punch and the audience 
waa decidedly In favor of "Gentleman Jim." 

Blossom Seeley. assisted by BUI Bailey and 
Lynn Cowan, olosed the first half, moved there 
from the next to closing spot. Hale and Pater- 
son taking that position. The present Seeley 
offering easily outdoea anything attempted by 
that young woman heretofore. It la of a novel 
conception artistically staged with snappy, 
sure fire numbers. Miss Seeley la dressing 
as attractively aa ever with her two assist- 
ants Immaculately clad In evening dress. 

The second half, consisting of four acta, 
had two dancing turns, the first, Maala King, 
assisted by Ted Doner, who opened after In- 
termission. Miss King la offering some novel 
dancing Ideas with her partner, one of the 
most graceful male steppers hereabouts. Orace 
De Mar followed Immediately after and took 
down a substantial hit with a monolog writ- 
ten by Herbert Moore. Miss De Mar takes to 
this line of work with ease and with produc- 
tive material she had little difficulty In estab- 
lishing herself. 

Frank Hale and Signe Peterson, In dancing, 
disclosed they have the right Idea for s danc- 
ing turn. The Versatile Sextette add an 
abundance of life to the act which aids it ma- 
terially. 

Chic Sale closed the vaudeville portion of 
the program. Sale went after the audience In 
his Inimitable way and carried off a laughing 
and applause hit. "Patria" closed the show. 
The picture held a goodly portion of the house 
but the episode disclosed nothing exceptional. 



AMERICAN ROOF. 

For the third successive week the American 
Roof had a good show the first half. Tuesday 
evening found the aerial resort with an 
audience creditable on a holiday night. The 
Gliding O'Mearas were responsible to a cer- 
tain extent for the crowd, the West Side danc- 
ing team having many followers. They are 
at the American for a full week preparatory 
to nailing to England. Closing the first half 
they took down a solid hit, after which Mr. 
O'Meara made a short curtain speech that got 
vrvir cfcrl!$\ 

HAfrlngtorf" antf Transfer, two girl*; 'opened 
the show. They have added a Hawaiian finish, 
not altogether satisfactory. There is too much 
of that these days and the girls do not get 
away with It to any great extent. Holl, Ells- 
worth and Merrick (New Acts) sang to fair 
returns. 



Klutlng's Animals secured recognition with 
the act the same. Klutlng is using the billing 
"The Act Beautiful" used for several years 
by a posing turn which features animals. Polly 
Prim with exclusive songs started slowly but 
nicked up with marked rapidity and scored 
a sure success at the finish. The present 
prolog in the way of a song carries little 
weight. It does not give the act a satis- 
factory start, making It necessary for Miss 
Prim to work all the harder with her second 
number. 

Sandy Shaw, Scotch, opened after Intermis- 
sion. He made a profound Impression espe- 
cially with the women. In hysterical laughter 
throughout Shaw goes in for character numb- 
ers. Frank Whittler and Co., In "The Bank 
Roll," a comedy, kept the show In the comedy 
vein. The plot rests on the interchanging of 
money, but it la done In such a way that for 

{>op audiencea it should provoke sufficient 
aughter. 

Mack and Vincent, next to closing, took 
away a hit. Mack scored handily with his 
comic Hebrew numbers with nts partner at 
her best while singing at the piano. Next to 
closing the heavy spot on a small time bill 
and Mack and Vincent got away with it with 
flying colors. Potter and Hartwell, acrobatic, 
closed. 

' HARLEM OPERA HOUSE. 

The return of Harry Swift, after several 
weeks' absence, due to the managers Illness, 
brought a cheerful note to the front of the 
house while an entertaining bill holds form 
back stage, the first half. Attendance was a 
little off the early part of the week, the bal- 
cony showing a vacant row or two at the Mon- 
day night performance. 

Comedy had the call throughout. The Merry 
Hunters, on second, gave the bill a good 
laughing flavor, following the opening of 
Niobe (New Acta), diving act. The Hunters 
have an amusing turn with a wealth of va- 
riety In the running. The talk between the 
two women, one fat and the other slender, 
has a first rate laugh in it and the whooping 
musical finish takes the trio off to a good 
hand. 

Allen and Lewis, with their taxlcab sketch, 
found the audience willing to laugh and car- 
ried the show forward entertalngly. The open- 
ing catches attention Immediately and the ex- 
change of talk between the ridiculous chauf- 
feur and his woman paaaenger la amusing, 
except for an occasional appearance of time- 
worn lines, such aa "I'm paying aa little at- 
tention aa possible." 

Van Bergen and Cosier followed two com- 
edy numbers with their straight singing act 
and at the moment the paoe slowed down 
slightly. The house liked the ballads aung 
by the baritone and the turn passed nicely. 

"What Happened to Ruth" waa a little fine 
In lta satire for the Harlem audience. They 
were a bit puzsled at first by the "plant'' 
who works from the box during the playing of 
the travesty sketch, and some of the fun was 
a trifle over their heads. The idea of the 
supposed "souse" in the audience joshing the 
serious sketch la a splendid bit of fun. It 
takes particular point in the middle of a 
small time bill, the popular priced shows 
being the home of the stilted sketch at which 
this travesty Is aimed In keen ridicule. 

Col. Jack Georges monolog was mors In line 
with the 12&** street audience's sense of 
humor. The political talk is a little late, 
dealing, aa It does, with the Issues of the last 
political campaign, but the Colonel gets his 
points over, even If he does force some of 
them rather hard. 

Koban Japs, a trio of acrobats, showing 
pedal juggling, and a sensational bit of perch 
work for the finish, closed the show except for 
the feature picture, "The Iced Bullet." The 
feature la a whale of a feat. One of the Japs 
climbs a perch fifteen feet high, at the top of 
which Is fixed a bicycle. While the juggler 
supports the perch on his feet the aerial 
worker doea a handstand on the bicycle ped- 
als, making the wheel revolve rapidly. 



JEFFERSON. 

Please take the Jefferaon theatre orchestra 
out In the back yard and give them a few re- 
hearsals. Throughout the entire perform- 
ance Monday evening they were playing Off 
key. And try to persuade the leader to keep 
pace with the various singers. He haa a 
playful habit of progressing, blissfully uncon- 
scious of the pauses made by the artists, 
with the result most of the tune the band waa 
either ahead of or behind the vocalists. 

The bill for the first half was a very good 
one, pleasing the audience, which showed Its 
appreciation by bursts of applause and roars 
of laughter when occasion demanded. Billy 
Klnkald started the entertainment with bag- 
pipe playing and juggling. He talks first 
with a fine Scotch dialect and then loses It. 
While nothing that he doea Is new, It Is all 
sure fire and presented In good showmanship 
fashion. 

Cornelia and Adele, man and woman, in 
"one," do singing and some exceptionally 
good dancing. Tbelr acrobatlo and knockabout 
stepping Is violent enough to command atten- 
tion anywhere, but their routining requires 
stage direction. Sinclair and Dixon, two 
men, straight and "nut," are a classy team. 
Tbe straight man haa a nice voice and ren- 
ders a ballad in approved vaudeville style. 
They speak good English and have good ma- 
terial which, however, would stand editing, 
for the reason that the first half of It doesn t 
J»^>e urith the sooord. They start »a by th«? 
'nut" foiling about the straight man ptryln* 
court to his wife, all three living together; 
then the straight man tells about his wife. 
They extract a large volume of humor out of 
the scheme of betting whether the audience 
will laugh at their respective jokes and finish 
with a quarrel song, each giving back various 



portions of their wardrobes borrowed from the 
other. Pleasing personalities. 

"Her Wedding Dsy" is a tabloid, with four 
chorus girls, one femsle principal and two 
men, straight and comedian. The stage la set 
with a special cvclorama drop made of cre- 
tonne, and the piano, table covers, curtains, 
etc., are on the aame lines, making an ef- 
fective stage dressing. They sing, dance 
and otherwise disport themselves along regu- 
lation lines, and the girls change their cos- 
tumes at least half a dosen times with about 
as much excuse aa the average. Nevlns and 
Gordon, with a special drop, do singing, danc- 
ing and crossfire, with a good line of material. 
They finish with the girl Impersonating a 
dummy figure that Is knocked about by the 
man, finally coming to life. The couple are 
"easy" in their work and handle themselves 
well. 

The Five Emigrants Is made of five people, 
three men, two men, with well-trained oper- 
atic voices. They open In "one" with a special 
drop showing the dock of the Italian Line 
In New York. They are supposed to have 
just landed from Italy and Immediately talk 
broken English and sing some native ditties. 
The drop Is raised end the action Is supposed 
to be five years later, In the west, with all 
clad In theatrical cowboy and cowgirl garb. 
For thla they also carry a special setting 
and the act could be made more effective by 
dissolving from tbe first scene Into the second 
by a proper handling of the lights, a very 
simple process If given a bit of thought The 
quintet harmonise wonderfully and earned 
for themselves a riot of applause. Good sing- 
ing la always appreciated by any audience. 

Nell McKlnle/ had tbe next to closing spot 
and Is evidently well known In that neighbor- 
hood, for he received applause on his en- 
trance. His singing and ''nut" nonsenslcall- 
tlee won approval. But he loses a lot by 
doing most of his singing standing on top of 
the upright piano In the orchestra pit. In 
front of the footlights, thereby losing what- 
ever value may attach to bis facial expres- 
sion. His mention of the word "hell" so many 
times depreciates tbe calibre of his offering. 
Stain's Comedy Circus, trained ponies, unrld- 
able mule and revolving tables, was a service- 
able closing act. 

But, don't forget about that orchestra. 

Jolo. 

— — — s 

23RD STREET. 

Pretty big show at Procter's 23rd Street 
the first half — not only in quantity, but much 
In "quality." Ten acts and the "Patria" ae- 
rial, aa well as other film. 

The vaudeville commences with Seymour snd 
Dupree — O. O. Seymour, the jumping "chink" 
with a new Dupree. They hsven't been In 
town for seven or eight years. For present 
day vaudeville the couple do a little too 
much talk for the opening. They should al- 
most Immediately start in on their respective 
specialties, Seymour with his Instrumenta- 
tion and Miss Dupree with her dancing. The 
main strength of tbe act as of yore, Is the 
jumping of Seymour. Dot karcelle, single wo* 
man, aang six or seven numbers In approved 
soubret fashion. She opened with s noisy 
Hula ditty and waded through the usual rou- 
tine of popular hits. Dot is hefty, but comely 
and full of physical magnetism. She Is an 
attractive female with wardrobe, plenty of 
voice and well liked. Pelletler and Co., (New 
Acts). 

Hodge and Lowell, "rube" and city woman, 
secured many laughs. The man's "boob" 
monolog Is certain of laughter. One could 
place a bet tbat he could foretell just where 
every laugh was sure to come, that Is, anyone 
at all familiar with vaudeville audiences. 

Harry Jolson, after eight weeks at Healy's. 
is trying our some new material, with a special 
drop to depict the interior of a Pullman sleep- 
er, Jolson wearing a porter's uniform. The 
monolog isn't sny too strong and there la 
a song about "shoes," the Idea having been 
employed In a moving picture some years 
ago. But Jolson won out strongly with his 
vocalising and at the finish they had to shut 
off tbe lights to stop the applause. 

Sullivan, Wills and Martin are doing s 
real old-time Irish comedy sketch, popular 
In the Tony Pastor's days. Two Irishmen 
courting a young widow, one educated snd the 
other a Tad, for contrast. But Instead of 
the olden-time method of concluding with a 
"break-down," they finish with the more mod- 
ern Chaplin custard pie stuff. One cannot 
help noticing the crudities" of ancient con- 
struction. Tbe trio was well liked and earned 
a couple of curtain calls. 

Handers and Mil lis injected a strong flavor 
of "big time" Into the bill with their ortstnal 
two-act, consisting of "nut" comedy 
and funny manipulation or bats. One does a 
"cissy" In such a legitimate manner at first 
the audience Isn't certain wbetner he Is se- 
rious or just pretending. They were a riot 

Heckman, Shaw and Campbell, with special 
plush cyclodratna, two women and a man, do 
high class singing, both women operating the 
piano, and the turn concluding with ukels. 
Tbe women are beautifully dressed and the 
man looks natural In a dress suit. Fine 
voices, certain to earn them applause any- 
where, but the act Is "concerty." Charles 
Kenna kept the entire house In rare good 
humor with his well-nigh perfect street fakir 
monolog. Theo and Co. with the balo^u 
sailing out over the audience In tbe darkened 
hpufift, and giving m«m and. women In the andl- 
cttcj •• an ct>pcFtur.lty la- ride in •!!-. wcn5 ca 
effective closer. The ten acta were run off In 
a little over two hours, Indicating Intelligent 
stage direction. Jolo. 

If you don't advertise m VARIETY, 
don't advertise. 












16 



MOVING PICTURES 



PICTURE PRODUCERS TRYING 
TO SHIFT PROPOSED FILM TAX 



Want Blank Stock Manufacturers to Shoulder Burden New 
York State Seeks to Impose. Exhibitors Say They 

Will Be Final 



The Wheeler Legislative Committee, 
to investigate the motin picture in- 
dustry, reconvened at the Murray Hill 
Hotel on Wednesday. The committee 
had previously sent a list of 46 Ques- 
tion's to each of the producers and ex- 
changes, with a request the questions 
be answered as soon as possible in . 
order to assist the committee in de- 
termining whether or not a tax should 
be levied. 

The first witness of the day was Wil- 
liam A. Wharton, president of Whar- 
ton, Inc., Ithica, N. Y. In response to 
the questions of Senator Hinman, 
counsel to the committee, Wharton ad- 
mitted his concern made a net profit 
of $45,000 last year, but explained it 
by saying that thev were contracting* 
producers, who received their money 
merely for producing for others. He 
admitted that three serials, which his 
concern made, had not gone over and 
that the people who had them pro- 
duced lost ponsiderable money. The 
next witness was Willam Wright, gen- 
eral manager of the Kalem Company. 
Mr. Wright testified his concern had 
lost $100,000 on 'The Social Pirates," 
a series of two-reel pictures released 
through, the General Film Co. He also 
testified that his company lost money 
with every five-reel picture they pro- 
duced and in consequence had ceased • 
releasing anything but one and two- 
reel subjects. 

Samuel Rothapfel, manager of the 



Rialto, testified that motion pictures 
were becoming more popular every 
day and that hit company had' paid a 
7 per cent dividend on its preferred 
stock. He also said that the Rialto 
had raised its prices to 25c and 50c in 
the evening. Under examination he 
said his salary was $10,000 a year, with 
a commission on the net profits. A 
sharp tilt occurred when William Sea- 
bury, counsel to the Associated Motion 
Picture Industry, asked Mr. Rothapfel 
where he obtained his figures in as- 
serting the v motion picture trade was 
the fifth industry in this country. 
Rothapfel finally admitted the publicity 
men might be responsible for the im- 
pression. 

Richard A. Rowland was the last 
witness of the dav, and in a general 
way he outlined the workings of the 
Metro organization. The meeting ad- 
journed at four o'clock. 

The general impression seems to be 
that a tax upon the industry is certain. 
One of the committee, after the ses- 
sion, was of the opinion that the tax 
could best be levied if directed at the 
manufacturers of raw stock, it being his 
opinion, these manufacturers could pass 
the buck down the line. 

The committet have still a host of 
witnesses to examine and a great 
quantity of testimony to take and the 
opinion prevails they will receive an 
indefinite extension after Feb. 15, on 
which date their commission expires. 



NOTICE 



On Pages 20 and 21 VARIETY offers a new depart- 
ment — The Film Players 9 Directory* 

This will be a permanent feature and will be cor- 
rected weekly. 



THAT OCHS-UNIVERSAL FEUD. 

The Lee Ochs-Universal controversy 
was accentuated during the week by 
editorial criticism in virtually every pa- 
per in the trade, and by exhibitors who 
think this is a very inopportune time to 
give so much publicity to a subject that 
may revive the demand for legalized 
censorship. 

The article in controversy, which ap- 
peared in the Universal house organ 
over a year ago, declaring a majority 
of exhibitors favored smutty pictures, 
caused considerable comment at the 
time of its appearance and Universal 
was in receipt of numerous protests 
from all over the country. At that 
time it was concerted that somebody 
had 'flivved" and the matter was care- 
fully laid to rest and forgotten until its 
resurrection by Ochs. 

'i)iirir.*; ihf o-»:iv<:niii/n of New 'Vrirk 
exhibitors at Albany last week the mat- 
ter was broached at great length and 
a resolution passed at the eleventh 



hour condemning Universal. The Al- 
bany newspapers all carried big stories 
on the subject and in many quarters it 
was regarded that considerable damage 
was done by bringing up the matter for 
an airing in the home of the Legisla- 
ture. 

Universal, which claims Ochs was in- 
spired to attack them because of their 
failure to advertise in The Exhibitors' 
Trade Review, of which Ochs is presi- 
dent, increased their advertising to nine 
pages in the News and World this 
week. 

Early this week a publishing house 
made inquiries in the trade with a view 
to getting a line of the Trade Review, 
which they claimed had been offered 
to them. 



Faye Atkins With Peerless. 

Faye Atkins, who madr* hrr fUm dv?- 
btit in the latest Alary Pickford picture, 
has been placed under a long term con- 
tract by the Peerless company, who ex- 
pect to develop her as a star. 



WOODS IN PICTURES. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 31. 
There js a report current here that 
A. H. Woods, the New York theatrical 
producer, is about to curtail his activi- 
ties in regard to productions for the 
speaking stage and devote his time al- 
most exclusively in the future to the 
fticture producing field. He and Stan- 
ey Mastbaum of this city are about to 
form a feature film producing concern 
with a special releasing proposition, 
and there is a possibility that D. W. 
Griffith is to become interested with 
them in the venture. 

Woods was here last week and saw 
Mastbaum before he left for Chicago, 
where he was to go over the plans for 
the building of a theatre. 

Through several sources outside of 
the Woods office in New York it was 
learned that Mr. Woods had been free- 
ly expressing his intention to go in for* 
picture production extensively in the 
future. During the past two weeks he 
informed no less than three persons of 
his intention to lay off on play produc- 
ing and devote his time to pictures. 

Victor Leighton, his general booking 
manager, who left the Woods office 
last week, is said to have arrived in 
Los Angeles Wednesday and it is bare- 
ly possible that he might make ar- 
rangements for a studio site on the 
Coast for Mr. Woods, who may also 
go to the Coast, if not now there. 



KESSEL ft BAUMAN SELL? 

The sale was reported this week of 
Kessel & Bauman, controlling the New 
Yoik Motion Picture Co., to the Tri- 
angle, with George Bauman retiring, 
and Adam Kessel remaining with the 
Triangle in an executive capacity, prob- 
ably relating to his company, at a large 
salary. 

One of the terms of the sale is said 
to be a condition imposed upon the 
partners that they will not engage in 
picture-making or the film business, 
excepting for Triangle, within three 
years from the date of sale. 

Mr. Bauman is said to have received 
around $500,000 for his interest. 

Kessel & Bauman are about as well 

known in pictures as any concern now 
operating. Their New York Motion 
Picture Company had the Keystone 
plant among others and it was the first 
to send Chaplin over the screen map. 

When Triangle formed, the N. Y. 
M. P. became one of its allies and re- 
leased the Keystone under the T ban- 
ner. 

Besides the amount received at the 
sale, the two men are reputed to have 
become wealthy during their period in 
pictures. 

H. E. Aitken, president of Triangle, 
is credited with having engineered the 
Kessel & Bauman purchase. 



O * * 



A A ▲ A 



AJT- ▼▼ TV TV ▼▼ 



▼ ▼ •" TT 






















• 



• 

I 



MOVING 



K 



17 



COURT DEFINES TITLE AS 

TRADEMARK IN FILM SUIT 



Justice Erlanger Finds for the Selig Company in Action 
Against the Unicorn Co. for Damages OVer Use of 

'The Rosary/' 



Justice Erlanger, in the Supreme 
Court, on Wednesday handed down an 
important decision to the theatrical and 
motion picture industry. It was in a 
sui brought by the Selig Polyscope 
Co. aganst the Unicorn Film Service 
Corporation in an action brought by 
the plaintiffs, through their attorney, 
Nathan Burkan, to restrain the defend- 
ant's use of the words "The Rosary" as 
the title of a photoplay and for dam- 
ages for the alleged unauthorized use 
of that title. The Justice holds that 
there should be judgment for the plain- 
tiffs for an injunction and for damages 
to be ascertained on a reference. The 

decision, in part, reatis as follows: 

There can be no doubt that Rowland & Clif- 
ford first adopted this title In connection with 
a dramatic composition. Their play by that 
name which was copyrighted in the year 1910 
was successfully produced In the following 
year and during four seasons afterwards. In 
June, 1015, this play under the same title 
was produced as a motion picture by the 
plaintiff 8elig Polyscope Company, which con- 
cern had acquired from Rowland and Clif- 
ford the rights to reproduce the original play. 
It appears from the evidence that this rep- 
resentation by them on the stage and as a 
motion picture had met with marked accept- 
ance by the public and that the good will 
acquired by the plaintiffs in the production 
under the chosen title "The Rosary" became 
of substantial value. 
While the title of a copyrighted play la not 



Arthur James 



presents 



FRANCES 
NELSON 



in Win. 



Cabanne's 



ONE of 

MANY 1 



A METRO wtmderplay in 

Five unusual acts contrived 

by Win. Christy Cabanne 

from his own story. 

Released on the • 
Metro Program Feb. 12th 




protected by the copyright, the use of that 
title is nonetheless to be secured to the owner 
of the copyrighted matter as a trade mark, 
if the title jso first employed by him has se- 
cured a trade significance as an arbitrary des- 
ignation (Outcault v. Lamar, 135 App. Dlv., 
110, 117; Caswell v. Hazard, 121 N. Y. 484, 
404; McLean v. Fleming, 06 U. S. 245, 254). 

As was said in the case last cited : "Phrases 
or even words in common use may be adopted 
for the purpose, if, at the time of their adop- 
tion, they were not employed by another to 
designate the same or similar articles of pro- 
duction or sale." 

Here the phrase "The Rosary," while well 
known In its reference to a form of religious 
observance, is in no sense descriptive* of a 
drama, as such. It is an arbitrary title when 
so employed, and, as appears, the authors and 
producers of the plaintiffs' play adopted this 
title to identify rather than describe the com- 
position itself. Indeed, the phrase is not aimed 
to be, nor is it, serviceable as a description 
of the subjects portrayed in the play, whether 
as acted or as exhibited upon the screen. 

I have no doubt therefore that this phrase 
was open to adoption by the plaintiffs and 
that, having acquired a secondary meaning In 
identification of the plaintiffs' dramatic com- 
position, it became associated with the good 
will of the business established in the produc- 
tion of the play, and was a trade mark (Out- 
cault v. Lamar, 135 App. Dlv. 110; Klaw & 
Erlanger v. General Film Company, 154 N. Y. 
Supp. 088). As such, Its character continued 
when applied to a representation in the form 



of a motion picture (Dickey v. Mutual Film 
Corporation. 160 N. Y. 8upp., 600). In June, 
1016, the defendant corporation, which was en- 
gaged in the business of buying motion pic- 
ture films and of distributing them for ex- 
hibvtloa released to its cup towers a JfJ»n ac- 
quired by it and renamed "The Rosary." It 
appears that this was an old film, represent- 
ing a dramatic portrayal, and had been ex- 
hibited under some other name. When choos- 
ing the title "The Rosary" and advertising 
the motion picture under it, the defendants 
knew of the plaintiffs' widely advertised and 
successful production ; its president, Mr. 
Schlank, was thoroughly familiar with the 
play, as he testifies, and I am satisfied from 
the evidence that the choice of this title for 
an old film was not merely accidental (British- 
American Tobacco Co. T. British-American 
Cigar Store Co., 211 Fed. R. 033, 035). Justi- 
fication for this use of the plaintiff's trade- 
mark cannot be found in the fact that the 
catalogues In evidence disclose the designation 
of other motion picture films by the use of 
the word "Rosary." So far as these cata- 
logues have any value as proof, they Indicate 
no more than that other persons in three in- 
stances have so named their film at dates long 
after the plaintiffs Rowland and Clifford ac- 
quired their trade mark by original adoption. 
Whether the films referred to were actually 
exhibited under conditions which the plain- 
tiffs might or might not have found to be In- 
jurious to their rights, Is a matter of specula- 
tion, but the defendant's case Is not aided by 
pointing to a poesible invasion of these rights 
by others, nor is It of Importance that a well- 
known song and novel had been published un- 
der the title "The Rosary" berore the date 
when the plaintiffs Rowland and Clifford so 
named their play. There is no similarity of 
enterprise In a dramatic composition whe* 
compared with a song or novel, such as to 
suggest or to present conflicting rights to a 
trade mark (Atlas Co. v. Street ft Smith, 204 
Fed. Rep. 808). 



NATIONAL CENSORSHIP. 

Cincinnati, Jan. 31. 

The National Society for the Sup- 
pression of Immoral Motion PJotnrf* 
was incorporated at Columbus, Ohio, 
last week. They will have headquarters 
at Cincinnati. Fred Stoll, of New York, 
is president and Joseph Kobb, of this 
city, secretary. 

The society will censor motion pic- 
tures in states which have no censor- 
ship. President Wilson, United States 
Senators, Congressmen and prominent 
business men will be made vice-presi- 
dents. 






BLANCHE SWEET DENIES. 






Los Angeles, Jan. 31. 
"Please deny the rumor that I was to 
be co-starred with a male star riext 
season," says Blanche Sweet. She 
adds: "My services were offered to 
several companies without my knowl- 
edge or sanction by a booking agent 
named Small. I am resting after six 
years of continual work until March 1, 
when I resume work, fulfilling a new 
contract with a big company, to be 
starred in big plays and screen adap- 
tations from novels." 



Charges Title Infringement 

Richard Lambert, through his at- 
torneys, House, Grossman & Vorhaus, 
is preparing action against the Vita- 
graph Co., claiming an infringement of 
the title of his play, "The Blue En- 
velope," in the Vitagraph picture, "The 
Blue Envelope Mystery." 



FILM ACTORS IN PERIL 

Los Angeles, Jan. 31. 
Lois Weber and Constance Crowley 
narrowly escaped death when a tidal 
wave engulfed them and swept them to 
sea at Laguna Beach, where they were 
taking films for Universal. Others in 
the party, after strenuous work and 
peril to themselves, rescued the two 
women, who are recovering at their 
homes. 



\ 



. 



_ uur 



BLUEBIRD PHSHAff 

• PRESENT 

VIOLET MERSEREAU 

"The Boy Girl" 

The Romantic Story 
of a Tomboy 



Directed by EDWIN STEVENS 



Booked through your local BLUEBIRD Exchange or 
BLUEBIRD PHOTOPLAYS (Inc.) 
1600 Broadway, Kmw York 



■ 



- 



18 



MOVING PICTURES 



. 



FOREIGN FILM TRADE'S CENSOR 
GROWING ALARMINGLY STRICT 



England Picture Visor, T. P. O'Connor, M. P., Selected by 
Trade, Frightening Some of Those Naming Him for 

No "Crook," "Sob" or "Death Bed" 
Scenes, Says Tay Pay. 



Londong, January 31. 

The English film trade is viewing 
with quite some alarm the position 
taken by T. P. O'Connor, M. P., its 
own selected censor for pictures. 

"Tay Pay/' as the parliamentary 
member is popularly known, has taken 
to the task of criticising the product 
to (>e shown over here so thoroughly 
local picture men are commencing to 
speculate how far their own empow- 
ered critic will go. 

"Crook stories" have already been 
barred from the screen by order of 
Mr. O'Conor; "sob stories" are in the 
same class, says the censor, and he? 
has likewise announced that pictures 
with "death bed scenes" have a mighty 
small chance of getting beyond his cen- 
sorial pencil. 

CHAPLIN FIGURES. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

John R. Freuler, president of the 
Mutual, wilf leave for the Coast within 
a few days to treat with Charley Chap- 
lin regarding a renewal of the comic's 
contract, which expires around May I. 
Reports have it Mr. Freuler's offer 
will be a shade under the current con- 
tract figure of something like $670,000. 

"Easy Street," the newest Chaplin 
two-reeler to be released Monday (de- 



layed a month principally because 
Charlie allowed a prop lamp-post to 
damage his countenance) is reported 
to be better than anything he had yet 
done for Mutual 

From the best of authority "Easy 
Street" is said to have cost $155,000 to 
produce, $84,000 of which was charged 
off to salary to Chaplin. This tops by 
far any two-reeler ever made. Yet the 
Mutual claims that it will easily come 
out ahead. The only Chaplin-Mutual 
unusually costly was "The Count," and 
that was because of the number of ex- 
tra people used. 

There have been wild guesses revel- 
ant to the Mutual's profits on their 
Chaplins, but that a sum in excess of 
$1,000,000 will be cleared by the end of 
the Chaplin fiscal year seems certain. 
At the end of the first six months the 
bookings for the year then amounted 
to $1,300,000. It was originally figured 
the production cost of the 12 Chaplin 
pictures would be $200,000, which added 
to his salary ran up to nearly $900,000. 
While the cost of production has ex- 
ceeded the estimate, the increase of 
bookings and the sale of foreign rights ' 
even matters. The price of the English 
rights was $500,000, while $150,000 was 
obtained for Australia. It is said the 
booking in this country will reach over 
the $2,000,000 mark. 



BRADY GETS A SURPRISE. 

William A. Brady and the other offi- 
cers of the World Film Corporation 
have been in. conference several times 
during the past week concerning the 
advisability of adopting a more elastic 
policy than heretofore in the company's 
productions. These discussions ad- 
mittedly have been brought about by 
the recently released farce called 
'Tillie Wakes Up," in which Marie 
Dressier is the star and Johnny Hines, 
the lively young comedian, plays the 
"opposite" role. 

This is the first comic picture made 
by the World-Brady interests in more 
than five months. The last previous 
experiment of this corporation in light 
entertainment upon the screen was 
called "The Summer Girl," successfully 
issued last August. Since then World 
picture Brady-made have adhered to 
the serious side of the drama. 

The reception of the Dressier farce 
has decided Mr. Brady and his asso- 
ciates to modify their exclusively 
dramatic output and manufacture a ae- 
ries of comedy productions to be re-, 
leased at stated intervals — say once* 
a month — by way of responding to the 
demand so. suddenly uncovered by "Til- 
lie Wakes Up." Mr. Brady, in discus- 
sing this altered view of what the pub- 
lic wants, said: 

"I am free to say that what hap- 
pened to Miss Dressler's picture took 
me completely by surprise. The farce 
had been made purely in the way of an 
experiment, and I was inclined to be 
skeptical regarding the outcome — the 
more so as it was a radical departure 
from our settled plan. 

"It is not always good business to 
induce the public to look for a certain 
line of product and then shift over- 
night to the direct opposite, and it 
would not have disappointed me if 
Tillie Wakes Up* had gone right to 
sleep again. 

"It was indeed a surprise party that 



awaited me. The reviewers led the 
grand march of praise, where I had 
been fully prepared to see them fall 
upon the play and rend it A day or 
two before the piece reached the gen- 
eral public an exhibitor who has three 
theaters in New York called me up and 
said: 'Just now I put up the slide an- 
nouncing Marie Dressier in her new 
piece, and there hasn't been a round 
of applause in this house in two years 
like the one that greeted Miss Dress- 
ier. Thought you'd like to know it.' 

"Then things began to happen. I 
went to the New York Theatre to see 
what all the fuss was about The big 
house was crowded and people were 
fairly rolling with laughter. The Park 
Theatre, Boston, which runs our pic- 
tures for the full week, began clamor- 
ing madly for a second week of Tillie 
Wakes Up.' The manager telegraphed 
'It's going like a whirlwind.' 

"A one-day theatre in Brooklyn in- 
sisted on having the farce for a second 
day. Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago 
and other cities fell to wiring for 
Tillie,' and of course it did not require 
a very extended continuation of this 
state of things to show my associates 
and myself that the public really de- 
sired our particular variety of screen 
fun. 

"Long ago in my career as a produc- 
ing manager I relinquished the idea of 
telling the public what it wanted ; and 
took up the rational pursuit of listen- 
ing. Occasionally this policy has been 
criticized as commercialism, but I have 
found it quite popular at the bank and 
profitable to the World Film Corpora- 
tion. 

"We recently eliminated all our male 
stars excepting Carlyle Blackwell in 
response to a clearly developed demand 
for woman stars, with results of a most 
satisfying kind, and now we will start 
producing comedies as a regular thing 
.along with our highly popularized seri- 
ous plays." 






A PRIVATE SHOWING OF 




THE GREATEST AFRICAN WILD ANIMAL and EDUCATIONAL PICTURE 

EVER PRESENTED, will be given in the near future. 

A two-hour entertainment with or with- 
out lecture. 

Broadway presentation for a run at one 



If interested, drop us a line and we will 
send you an invitation. 



This picture was made by Mr. J. C. Hem- 
ment, F.N.G.S., the man who made the 
first Paul J. Rainey pictures. 



dollar admission. 

Theatre and date to be anr mnced 
shortly. 



PICTURE PRODUCING CO., Inc. 



JACK GOLDBERG, General Manager 



Offices: 1493 Broadway, Putnam Building. 
Suite 513-515-517. Phone, Bryant 53 18-9* 

LOUIS B. BLOOM, Business Manager 



p3i" -» -r" 



MOVING PICTURES 



19 




Allan Alias, Inc. bare seeured a leas* and 
optlan of parehaaa on the Botter-Otlmour 
moilni picture studio at Hudaon Heights, N. 
J., and naTa mored Into eseeutlre offices In 
tbo Candler Building. . Allen Lowe la the 
moTlng aplrlt In the proposition and denies 
thai he Is to manufaotare or In any way be 
connected with feature or an/ other pictures 
taken In the regular way. He has had the 
atudlo fitted up with lights wholly different 
to any arrangement In any other. The firm 
has engaged the well known mechanical ex- 
pert. George Selffert, as head of that depart- 
ment. G. C. Cook, who has been the offiolal 
camera man for Barnum a Bailey, will han- 
dle that end. Joseph W. Standlsh will direct 
and' handle the artists and their costuming. 
Boyd Qllmour Is to take charge of the con- 
struction and scenic work. B. A. Cowan, 
formerly with the Bdlaon Company, Is to be a 
part of the organisation. The other employeea 
will be selected for special knowledge of a 
new departure which Mr. Lowe thinks Tery 
highly of. Indleatlre of one special branch la 
the engagement of Harry Orogln, a young 
artist, who has the faculty of turning out 
aurprislngly* new matter. He. was aaaoclated 
with Rube Ooldberg In hla cartoon pictures 
and they any he baa something worth while 
to project for AU*n Al'*n. They expect to 
make an Important atatement In Vajuht 
very aeon. 

Violet Hersereau will atart the March re- 
leases for Bluebird with "The Boy Girl." 
produced at Bluebird'* Leonla (N. J.) studio 
and directed by Edwin Sterens. Miss Mor- 
aereau la now at work on another subject, 
directed by Harry Millard, In Leonla, entitled 
"Suaan'a Gentleman," the work of Kate Jor- 
dan. Later In March Ella Hall will bo seen 
In "Polly Redhead," showing next week at 
the Rlalto, New York, and there will bo an- 
other Lynn F. -Reynolde Bluebird temporarily 
titled "The Cruise of the Alden Basse." There 
are eereral aubjecta ready and awaiting ached- 
ule, Including: "Pawned." with Ella Hall the 
star; "Maroel'a Birthday Present," directed 
by Rupert Julian, who will be featured with 
Louise Lorely and "The Flash-Llght Girl." 
directed by Joseph De Orasse, with Dorothy 
Phillip* the atar. Rex Ingram baa finished 
a drama, with scenes laid In China, entitled 
"Flowers '' Doom," In whloh wedgewood 



Nowell will bo featured. Ingram had the 
benefit of adrloe from R. H. Dubbins, a mem- 
ber of UnlTeraal City's exeentrre staff, who 
spent sight years In China on Government 
serrlos. Wn. Worthlngton, who dlreoted 
Franklyn Farnum and Agnes Vernon In fin- 
ishing "The Clock," a story by Mala Harey : 
and Lois Weber Is directing Bon Wilson and 
Mlgnon Anderson In a subject as yet unnamed 
"Bran Aa Ton and I" la the title of another 
Lola Weber Bluebird, ready for rah 



D. W. Griffith's actlrltlee hare been particu- 
larly Tarled during the past week. Oa Jan. 
25, at Washington, D. C, he dellTarad'an 
addreas to the members of the National Art 
League of America. The following day he waa 
the gueet of honor at a dinner grren by the 
/Hon. Champ Clark. From the Capitol, Mr. 
Griffith went to Richmond, Vs., In roaponae to 
an lnritatton to apeak to the Richmond drrl- 
alon of the Daughters of the Confederacy. 
And, on Tuesday of this week he was the 
guest of the Norfolk, Vs., Chamber of Com- 
merce. Mr. Griffith's present risk to Rich- 
mond and Norfolk, his first sines his boyhood, 
waa weloomed by the newspapers of both 
cities as the occasion for lengthy Interviews. 
"Intolerance" Is appearing la Richmond this 



The annual Grand Movie Carnival and Ball 
of the Association of Exhibitors of Brooklyn 
and Long Island la to be given at Stauch'e 
Palaoe, Coney Ialand, » on Feb. 21. The B. 
R. T. baa agreed to run special trains from 
Brooklyn Bridge over the Brighton Beach, 
West End and Fourth avenue subway llnee 
for the occasion. A voting contest will be 
conducted by the Brooklyn Eagle to deter- 
mine the most popular motion picture sctress 
and actor, who are to be crowned aa king and 
queen for the carnival. 

Dorothy Gish and William Desmond are the 
stars of the Triangle feature releases for 
Feb. 25. Miss Glsb will appear In a Fine 
Arts comedy drama entitled "stageatruek," 
written by Roy Bomervllle and directed by 
Edward Morrlsey. William Deemond will hsvs 
a vehicle well suited to his personality In "The 
Last of the Ingrams," an Ince-Kay Bee pro- 
duction, written by John Lynch and directed 



by Walter Edwards, under the supervision of 
Thomas H. Inoe. 



Julius Singer, stock comedian of the M« 
Building's seventh floor, has gone to ton An- 

felea and things are not the same around 
lluebird's New York Branch. Mr. Singer 
has gone to Universal City aa general repre- 
sentative of the L-Ko Comedies and expects 
to remain away from the lights of Broadway 
for an indefinite time. Julius Stern, one of 
the L-Ko owners, has also gone to Los An- 
geles, probably to give the other Julius all 
of the news. 

"The Plow Woman" will soon appear on 
the Bluebird program, with Mary MacLaren. 
featured In a atory that reflecta life among 
the homesteaders of North Dakota. Charles 
Swlckard will direct, succeeding Lots Weber 
In charge of Miss MacLaran's screen appear- 
anoee. "The Myaterloua Mrs. M. " the Blue- 
bird for current release, waa the last pic- 
ture in whloh Miss Weber dlreoted Miss 
MacLaren. 



M. L. Markowlts. manager of the Universal 's 
San Francisco exchange, has about oompleted 
arrangements to erect a branch In Los Ange- 
les. Markowlts has laaued some novel pub- 
licity articles for "The Purple Maak' r In 
Frisco, the town being pretty well oovered 
with buttons and pictures of the stars. 

David Kline resigned last week as manager 
of the Majestlo Gardens. Grand Rapids, Mich., 
to enter the atate rights film business In Ohio. 
He was suc c eeded by Ward Brown, recently 
manager of the Strand and former clrcua preaa 
agent. Cedrto Lawrence, who came from the 
Fuller, Is the new 8trand manager. 

Ethel Clayton In "The Web of Deelre," por- 
traya the young wife of a We«t*rn wat»r power 
engineer who becomes suddenly rich and goes 
to New York. The wife's deelre to climb 
socially almost ruins her happiness and nearly 
pulls down the entire financial structure 
reared by her husband — but not quite. 

Jack Sherrlll Is to be co-starred with 
Dorothy Bernard In a forthcoming. Art Drama. 
'The Aocomplloe," which la being produced 
under the direction of Ralph Dean at the 
William L. Sherrlll Feature Corporation's 
stu£'os at Fluahlng, L. I. The picture Is to 
be released Feb. 8. 



Arthur Blankmyer returned to Detroit last 
week after an inspection of the Trl-Stste Film 
Corporation's exchanges In Ohio, Michigan 
and Kentucky. This company, of which hs Is 



the president, has recently taken over the Art 
Drama productions for thoae three states. 

Aa engagement of unusual Interest to all 
exhibitors la that of Anna Little, the former 
American and Unlveraal atar, has been en- 
gaged to play oppoalte Robert Warwick In the 
Belanlck Picture ptodaCClMf' of E. PfcNltyfc 
Oppenhelm'a novel, "The Court of St. Simon." 

Georgea Benolt, photographer of William 
Fox'a "The Scarlet Letter," who waa Injured 
badly while filming the picture, haa Ju*t been 
dtacharged from the hospital. Benolt fell with 
hie camera from an elevated platform on 
whloh he waa "■hooting" a acene. 

Edward Ellis." famous for hie "crook" char- 
acterisation In "The Dummy," and also as the 
author of, "Any Night," haa been algned by 
the Apollo Co. for an Important role In "The 
Law That Failed," which la being produced 
for the Art Dramas program. 

• It has been announced by Thomaa A. Edi- 
son, Inc.,* that Conquest Pictures, the coming 
Edison productions based on a new Idea and 
a* new ideal, will be released on the direction 
of W. W. Hodklnson, the country's foremost 
authority on the marketing of motion pictures. 

The Marie Dressier comic motion picture 
play Just Issued by the World-Brady Interests 
has made such a success that the film corpora- 
tion may extend its lines In fun-making pro- 
ductions. 

MoClure Pictures reports that the demand 
for "Seven Deadly 81ns," the series of seven 
five-reel features Is exceedingly all expecta- 
tions and that the Triangle exchanges are 
being overwhelmed with* orders for the series. 

Betty Howe, International star, who had pro- 
minent parts In several of the epl nodes of 
"Beatrice 1 Fairfax," has Just been discharged 
from a hospital In Brooklyn, where she under- 
went a eerloua operation for appendlcitts. 

K. B. 8. B. haa appropriated $100,000 to 
conduct a national advertising campaign In 
behalf of the J£ssanar-Max Llnder comedies. 
$25,000 of this Is to be expended with trade 
papers. 

Helen Holmes and J. P. McGowan will ap- 
pear at the Pantages houses In their respective 
roles of Helen Dawson and Jim Blake which 
they portrayed In "A Lass of the Lumber- 
lands." 



A new edition of "Damaged flood*" will be 
releaaed on the Mutual schedule for Feb. 12. 




•■••••••" ■••■' ---"-•- • ■ •■*•••-■ -■■■ t - ■ •--■■ 



,:$:#*>:>.•.'*: 



I'.v. ■■,'•;'; 






















Quality on the 

yendable progra^^ m 

Why "Special?" *■ -*** ' 



High Cost of Production 
Highest Standard of Plot 
and Scenario 

A Story of the First Magnitude 
Perfect Photography 
Wonderful Seta 
Ideal Location 
Details Right 






'*'.'.'.*%'•'• 



F'-'-.vV.- '•■•.•'••.•'■ •'•'■' 



Why on a Program ? 



Because we are here to help 
every holder of a franchise for 

WORLD PICTURES 




?.''•' :':'■]■:'. ••'•''.'■.'•■■!•''''.•'•' •'•'•'• 






WW: 



— « 



■ m i ■ ii nn mmmmmrrm 



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■■ " ■ 



I 






Willi AM A. OtlAOY 
In association with 
WORLD PICTURES 
presents 






ALICE BRADY 



in 



"The Hungry Heart 

From rhe famous ploy FROU-FROU 
Directed by EMILE CHAUTARO 






ti/.vJt-'V.'W 



• - ■ .— ,• 

■ 






20 



■ r-» 



A 



VARIETY 



sBsmam 



FILM PLAYERS' DIRECTORY 

Names of Picture Player* and Picture Directory with names of companies Added when 
known. When company it unknown, no abbreviation follow* name unless person is 

vlh-eUoi, ^licn ^Dct'" inilti-w*. - 

M Dct" stands for Director whenever listed. Other abbreviations are to identify the 
playing company. 

Thin Directory will be published weekly in VARIETY. Errors or omissions will be 
corrected upon receipt of proper information, and companies added or changed to names 
when notified. 

The abbreviations in the list below are as follows: 



Am- AMERICAN 

Ap— APOLLO 

Ar-ARROW 

Art-ARTCRAFT 

At- AM ERIC AN TALKING 

As— ASTRA 

And-ANDERSON PRODUCING CO. 

Boa-BALBOA 

Bio— BIOGRAPH 

Blu- BLUEBIRD 

Cit-GATE CITY PROD. CO. 

Cen-CENTURY 

Con-CONTINENTAL 

Cha-CHARACTER PICTURE CO. 

Chr-CHRISTIE 

Cky-CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Col-COLUMBIA 

Dix-DIXIE 

Eq-EQUITABLE 

E&R-E. & R. JUNGLE CORP. 

Eag-EAGLE 

Ed-EDISON 

Em— EMERALD 

Edu— EDUCATIONAL 

Erb— ERBOGRAPH 

Es-ESSANAY 

F-WILLIAM FOX 

FP-FAMOUS PLAYERS 

Fro-FROHMAN AMUSE. CO. 

FA-FINE ARTS 

Got-GOTHAM 

Gau— GAUMONT 

Gol-GOLDWYN 

Hor-HORSLEY 

HB— HERBERT BRENON 

I-INCE 

In-INTERNATIONAL 

Iv-IVAN 

Juv-JUVENILE FILMS 

Km^KJNEMACOLOR 

KB-KAY BEE 

Kl-GEORGE KLE1NE 

K-KALEM 

Key-KEYSTONE 



A 
Abbey May 
Aooott Marguerlta — 

Field 
Abbott Gypsy— Vog 
Abbott Jack L 
Abernethery Lollle 
Abingdon wm L— Ca- 

U 
Abramaon I Dct Iv 
Abrlll Dorothy— L 
Ackennan Constantino 

M— Dct PP 
Acker Eugene 
Aeord Art 
Adams Wm P 
Adams Kath— Th 
Adams Stella — Ch 
Adolfl John — Dct Fox 
Alnsworth Charles 8 

— Es 
Altken Spott— Fa 
Albert Elsie— U 
Albertl Viola 
Albertson Arthur— K 
Alden Mary . 
Alexander Ed — F 
Alexander Claire — Hor 
Alexander F D — F 
Alexander Sara 
Allen Bertha— Mllo 
Allen Phyl— F 
Alley A W— Dct Am 
Allison May M 
Alter Lottie 
Ames Gerald 
Anderson Rob — FA 
Anderson Mlgnon — Th 
Anderson Mrs N 
Andrews F — FP 
Anker W 
Aokl Tsurl — L 
Apfel Oscar C — Dct F 
Arbuckle Andrew — YM 
Arbuckle Maclyn 
Arden Edwin— AP 
Arey Wayne — Th 
Arbuckle Roscoe 
Arllng Ch— F 
Armstrong Billy — Key 
Arnold Cecil — Key 
Arnold Ed — Es 
Arnold Helen — Fro 
Arona Bernard P — Dct 

U 
Ashley Arthur— Wld 
Ashley Chas E— Dct 

Eh 
Asher Max 
AHtor Oamllle — S 
Attle Jos M— PP 
Atwell Grace— FP 
Aubrey J — P 
Augunt Ed— Dct Kin 
AuBtln Al— L9 
Avery Chan — Dct Key 
Averlll Nanry — Ed 

B 

n.-iron F ■ 

Bacon Lloyd F— T,fl 

Paderr Clar (1— Dct 

Key 
Pn'Tol Klnc 
lie"' v Pill— Drt U 



Bailey Oraee H— U 
Balrd Leah— U 
Balrd Stewart 
Baker Ed— U 
Baker Elsie — Wh 
Baker Geo D— Dct M 
Baker Richard F — 

Dct Ea 
Baker Craig 
Baldwin Ruth A— Dct 

U 

Balfour Aug 
Balfour Elsie— F 
Banks Perry — Am 
Bara Theda — F 
Barachl Nllde— Bag 
Barbea Rich 
Baring Mathllde 
Baring Nancy 
Barker Reg— I-T 
Barnett Chester — W 
Barrett C C— Mllo 
Barrett M lunette 
Barrlngton Herbt — U 
Barrlsoale Bessie — I-T 
Barrows, Henry A 
Barrows Norman — Dct 

Chicago "Herald" 

Travelog 
Barrymore Ethel 
Barry Eddie — Ch 
Barrymore John 
Barry Eleanor 
Barrymore Lionel 
Barry Pauline 
Barry Viola 
Bartfett Chas E— Dct 

B 
Bary Leon — As-P 
Baakette Lena— U 
Bassett Rus— F P 
Bateman Victory 
Batty 8tephen — Hor 
Bauer Arthur— Th 
Bayne Beverly — M 
Beach Correa — Reg 
Beamish F— Wld 
Beaudlne W— Dct U 
Beaumont Harry — Ea 
Beban Geo 
Beck John 
Beldennann David — 

Mllo 
Belasco Jan — U 
Delasco Walter— U 
Belmont Jos — Key 
Belmore Lionel — Dct 
Benedict Klngflley — I' 
Bennett Enid— K-B 
Denner Yale D 
Bennett F F— FA 
Bennett Rich— A 
Benson Clyde — IT 
Bonwon May E — W 
Bentley Alice— Bio 
Benton Curtis— U 
Benton Marie \. — 
Brrnnscr fl. \> A' — \j 
Tjer\<fceh Th'.irlow— P 
Berber Rpa — Dct Am 
Bernard Dorothy — Fox 
Berthelet Arthur — Dct 

Ea 
Bertram Wm — Dct 



LP-LOCAL PHOTOPLAYS 

Lon-LONDON FILM CO. 

LS-LONE STAR 

LKO-L-KO 

L-LASKY 

Lib-UBERTY 

Mor-MOROSCO 

M.n- EMERSON 

McC-McCLURE 

MN-MABEL NORMAND 

Moss-B. & MOSS 

Mu-MUTUAL 

Nat-NATIONAL DRAMA 

Ni-NIAGARA 

Ncg-NAT C. GOODWIN 

Nev-NEVADA 

Nt-NORMA TALMADGE 

Pal-PALLAS 

Par— PARAGON 

Pow-POWELL PRODUCING 

Pic-MARY PICKFORD 

Pri-PRTVATE FILM FEATURES 

Pol— POLLARD 

PP— PALACE PLAYERS 

Per-PEERLESS 

Pop-POPULAR PLAYS & PLAYERS 

P-PATHB 

U-UNTVERSAL 

Use—UNITY SALES 

USA-U. S. AMUSE. CO. 

Re— REGENT 

Ro-ROLIN 

Rol-ROLFE 

S-SELIG 

Sel-SELZNICK 

St-STERN 

Sun-SUNBEAM 

So-SOLAX 

Th-THANHOUSER 

T— TRIANGLE 

Vi-VITAGRAPH 

Vim-VTM 

Vog— VOGUE 

Wld-WORLD 



Bertsch Marg— Dct VI 

Berwln 

B eaaerar Eugenie — S 

Beat Mabel— Vim 

Bevan Billy— LKO 

BUltngton Frenoelia — 

U 
Billings Blllle— VI 
Binder Ray J — FA 
Birch Caroline 
Blaohe Alloa— Dct US 

A 

Black W W— Fox 
Blackwell Carlyle — 

Wld 
Blair Ruth 
Blair Sidney 
Blake Loratta 
Blake Lucy — Moas 
Blake Al D— Hor 
Blanchard Eleanor 
Blevlns Malcolm— U 
Bllnn Genevieve 
Bllnn Holbrook— Wld 
Blood Adele 
Blystone J B — Dct L 

KO 
Boardman True— K 
Boland Eddie— U 
Bonavlta Capt Jack — 

Dct Hor 
Bondhlll Gertrude 
Bonner Marg H 
Booker Harry — Key 
Boone Dell 
Borxage F 
Boas F F 
Bosworth Hobart— Dct 

L 
Botter Harry — Dct 

Monmouth 
Bottomley Roland — 

boa 
Bowers Jno E — M 
Bowes Lawrence — Mu 
Bowman W J — Dct 
Brabln Chas — Dct 
Bracken Bertram — Dct 

F 
Bracy Sidney — Ar 
Bradbury J— S 
Bradbury Ronald — K 
Bradley Harry 
Bradshaw Lionel — L 

KO 
Brady Alice— Wld 
Brady Edwin J— U 
Breese Edmund — Pop 
Rrennan Edw — M 
Brenon Herbert — Dct 

HB 
Brent Evelyn— M 
Brice Rosetta 
Broadwell Robt B— 

Dct Hor 
Rrockwcll Gladys — F 
Brontl Adelaide 
?Ji-.oo¥tp \'nn O^ko"— 

Dct VI 
Brooks Sammy — Ro 
Brown Clarence L — 

Dct Par 
Brown J Edwin — U 
Brown W H— FA 



Brown Lena V 
Brown Bertha 
Brown Maxine V 
Brownell Louise — I 
Browning Tod — Dct 

FA 
Bruce Belle 
Bruce Clifford 
Bruce Robt C — Dct 

Edu 
Brule F— VI 
Brunton Wm — Big 
Brundage Mathllde 
Brunette Frltsl 
Brunton Robt A — Dct 

I 
Bryan Vincent P— Dct 

LS 
Bryant Chaa 
Buckland Wilfred — 

DctL 
Buel Kenean — Dct F 
Buhler Rich 
Bunny Geo 
Burdlck Faye 
Burkhart Theo— Wld 
Burke Jos — Rol 
Burkhardt Harry 
Burke J Frk— K-B 
Burmester Auguste 
Burnett Jessie— Hor 
Burns Fred — FA 
Burns Nell — Chr 
Burns Robt P— Vim 
Burreas Wm — F 
Burrough Tom— F 
Burton Charlotte— Am 
Burton Clarence F 
Burton Ethel— Vim 
Burton Ned— HB 
Busch Mae— Key 
Bushman Francis X — 

M 
Butler Fred J 
Butler Wm J — Dct 
Byrne Jack— Dct 
Byron Nina— I 

c 

Cabanne W C — Dct M 
Cahill Marie— Mu 
Calvert E H — Dct En 
Campeau Fk— S 
Campbell Colin — Dct 
Campbell Emma — Mu 
Campbell Eric — M 
Campbell Webster — VI 
Campbell Wm 9 — Dct 

Key 
Capellanl Al — Dct Sel 
Capellanl Paul 
Caprice June — F 
Carew Ora — Key 
Care we Edwin — uct M 
Carey Harry — F 
Carle Nalda— U 
Carleton Lloyd B — 

Dct U 
C'arl'sWF-fty. 
Carlyle Sidney D 
Carpenter Gerald D 
Carpenter, Horace B 

— L 
Carr Dixie— IT 
Carroll Wm A — Am 



Carter Harry— U 
Carter Nan— F 
Caaslnelll Dolores — 

Castle Mrs Vernon— 

In 
Cavender Glen — Dct 

Key 

Xeca- Ed^F 

Cecil Ora— Hor 
Chadwlck Helens— P 
Chaney Loo — U 
Chanler Elba — Mu 
Chaplin Chas — Mu 
Chapman, Chaa D — 

Dct LS 
Charles John 
Charleaon Mary— Es 
Chatterton Tom — Am 
Chaudet Bmlle— DctP 
Chaudet Louis W — 

U 
Cheater Ruth 
Chlldera Naomi— VI 
Chram Violet— U 
Christie Al E— Dct 

Chr 
Christy Iva W 
Christy Jaa A 
Christy Nan— H 
Church Fred — U 
Clair Roy— M 
Claire Gertrude— I 
Clancy Geo— F 
Clark Fk— 8 
Clark Harvey — Am 
Clark J King 
dark Margt— FP 
Clark Redfleld 
Clarke Geo— F 
Clary Chaa— L 
Claypoole Milton E— 

Mllo 
Clayton Ethel— Wld 
Clayton Marguerite — 

— Es 
Clements Hal— Dct 
Cllffe Henry C 
Clifford Ruth— U 
Clifford Wm 
Clifton Elmer— FA 
Cline Ed F— Dct FA 
Close Ivy 
Cloy May — Am 
Clugston Robt — F 
Coakley John — Dct 
Cobb Edmund F — Es 
Cochrane Geo— Dct U 
Cody Lewis J— MN 
Coghlan Rose — Iv 
Cohan Geo M— Art 
Collier Constance 
Collier Eddie 
Collier Bmlle 
Cilller Wm 

Collins Jno H— Dct M 
Collins Jose 
Collins Wm 
Colwell Goldle 
Commerford Thos — Es 
Compton Chas 
Concord Chester Co— 

Key 
Conk! In Wm — L 
Connelly Bobby— VI 
Connell Grayce V — 

Key 
Connelly E J— M 
Conway Jack— Dct U 
Cook Lillian— CKY 
Cooke Ethlye— Th 
Cooley Frk— Dct 
Cooley Hal— U - 
Cooper Claude H— Th 
Cooper Geo— VI 
Cooper Miriam 
Corbett Wm D, 
Corcoran Ethel M 
Cornellna Bess 
Cortes Armand F 
Costello Maurice G W 

—Erb 
Coudray Peggy — U 
Courtlelgh Wm Jr 
Courtot Marguerite — 

FP 
Cowan Joe— Vim 
Coyle Walter V— Dct 
Cosine Arthur— VI 
Craig Chas— F 
Craig Nell— Es 
Crampton Howard — U 
Crane Harry F — U 
Crawford Florence 
Crawley Constance 
Crehan Jos — F 
Crlmmlns Dan— Kl 
Crittenden Trockwood 

D— U 
Crompton Frank— Dct 

Hor 
Crosfhwaithe Ivy — 

Key 
Crowe Eleanor — F 
Crowell Josephine B 

—FA 
Cruze James 
Cummlngs Geo F — U 
Cummlngs Irving 
Cummlngs Robt 
Cunard Grace — U 
Cunard Mlna — U 
Cunep Lester— York-M 
Curan Thou A— Th 
Currier Frk— M 
Curtis Allen— Dct U 

D 

D'Albrook Sidney 
Dale Hclene 
Daly Arnold 
Dalton Dorothy— T 

Dsly Clara l,-,AT 

D«.l>- Jam ps L — Am 
Daly Wm R— Dct 
Dana Viola— M 
Daniels Rebc — Ro 
Daniel Frk— VI 
Darlen Frk 
Darkfeather Mona 



Dark Cloud— F» 
Darling Grace — In 
Darling Ida— FP 
Darmond Grace — As-P 
Davenport Alice — Key 
Davenport Blanche 
Davenport Chas E — 

Dct 
Davenport Dorothy— I)' 
Davey Horace — Dct 

Chr 
Davidson Jno — Wld 
Davidson Max — FA 
Davidson Wm B — M 
Davles Howard 
Davis Edwards 
Davis Mattle— U 
Davis Ulysses — Dot 
Davis Wm 8— Dct F 
Daw Marjorie — L 
Dawley J Searle— Dct 

FP 
Dawn Hasel — FP 
Day Bingham — Dct 
Day Joel 
Daye June 
Dayton Frk — Es 
Dean Faxon M 
Dean Jack — L ' 
Dean Julia 
Dean Priacilla— U 
Dean Ralph — Dct Fro 
Dean Rosemary 
Dean Ted — Fro 
Doarholt Ashton— Am 
DeCarlton Grace — Th 
DeCarlton Geo— P 
DeCamp Frk — F 
Decker Kathryn B 
DeCordoba Pedro 
DeCordova Rudolph — 

Key 
DeGarde Adele— VI 
DeGrasae Jos — Dct U 
DeGrasse Saml A — FA 
De Haven Carter — U 
Delaney Bert 
Delaney Leo 
Delaro Hattle 
DeLtnsky Victor 
DeMllle Cecil— Dct L 
DcMUle Wm C— Dct L 
Demore Harry C — U 
Dentler Marlon , 
Denver Vera 
DeRue Carmen — FA 
Desmond Wm — I-T 
Dickerson Jennie 
Dlckerson Lydia — F 
Dietl Frank H— boa 
Dllllon, Jno Webb— F 
Dill Max— Mu 
Dillon Edward— Dct 
Dillon Jack— Dct Ker 
Dillon Jack— FP 
Dion Hector 
Ditt Josephine 
Dolberg Camllle 
Don David L 
Donaldson Arthur 
Donnelly Jas A — Key 
Donovan Frk P — Dct 

Mllo 
Dore Gladys — Th 
Dorien Chas W — U 
Doro Marie— -fa 
Douglas Jas S — Dct 
Douglas Watkyns 
Doumler Jack 
Dowllng Jos — I 
Dowlan Wm C — Dct 



Dressier Marie— Mu 
Drew Cora 
Drew Lillian — Es 
Drew Mrs Sydney— M 
Drew Sidney— M 
Drew 8 Rankin— Dct 

VI 
Dubrey Clare— U 
Du Cello Countess — U 
Dudley Chas — boa 
Duffy Jack— St 
Dunaeuw Nicholas 
Dunbar Helen— M 
Dunbar Robt M 
Duncan Albt E— K 
Duncan Wm — VI 
Duncanson Harry L — 

Es 
Dunn John J — P 
Dunn Wm R— VI 
Dupont Joyce K 
Durfee Mlnta — Key 
Durham Lewis — I 
Duquett Yolande — Sun 
Dwan Allan — Dct Gol 

E 
Eagle Oscar — Dct Got 
Eagles Jennae — Th 
Earle Edward 
Earle Josephine 
Earle W P S— Dct VI 
Eason Reeves — Dct 
Easton Henry C — Dct 
Eddy Violet Y— U 
Edeson Robert 
Edwards Beverly 
Edmondson Al — K 
Edwards Henry — Dct 

Turner • 

Edwards J Gordon — 

Dct F 
Edwards Ted — Key 
Edwards Vivian — Key 
Edwards Walter — Dct 

I 
Edwin Walter— Dct 
Eldrldgc Chas 
Elliott Robt— M 
Ellis John 
El!!c--R«!>t D-KVl 
V.ilvKOn MrM-Jcrk*— V 
EUlnton Grace 
ElHworth Warren — Dct 

Am 
Elmer Clarence J 
ElvldRe June— Wld 
Elwell Geo E — Nymp 



Emerson Jno— Dct Plo 
Emery Maude — U 
Emory May — Key 
Eric Fred— Th 
Erlanger Frk A — boa 
Esmonds Eva 
fiinahrooM Howard 
Evsob Owen — Vog 
Evens' BadgiJ— Wld 
Eyre Agnsa . 
Eyton Bessie— 8 

F 
Fabrney Milton— Dot 

Hor 
Fairbanks Douglas 
Fairbanks Madeline— 

Th 
Fairbanks Marlon — Th 
Fallon Thos F — FP 
Farley Dorothea — Cen 
Farley Jas L — U 
Farnum Fklyn — U 
Farnham Henry A — 

Dct 
Farnum Dustin 
Farnum Marshal — Dct 
Farnum Wm 
Farrlngton Adele — U 
Farrar Geraldlne 
Faust Martin J 
Fawcett Geo 
Fay Billy— Ro 
Fay Hugh — Key 
Fasenda Louise*— Key 
Feely Maude 
Fellows Rockllffe — 

Wld 
Fenwlck Irene— FP 
Ferris Wm 
Feuhrer Bobby — FA 
Field Geo— Dct 
Fielding Romalne — 
Fields Lew— Dot Wld 
Figman Max— Dct M 
Fllson Al W— S 
Fischer Margarita — M 
Fisher Geo— I 
Flschback Fred— Da 

Key 
Fisher Harry Jr— FA 
Fltsgerald Jas A — Dct 

Prl 
Fltamaurice Geo— Dct 

P 
Fltspatrick Jas A— 

Dct 
Fitsroy Louis 
Flanagan D J — CKY 
Flugrath Edna — Lon 
Flugrath Leona — Ed 
Fona Gloria— U 
Foote Courtney 
Forbes Harris L— Dct 
Forde Eugenie— Am 
Korrie Franals — Dct U 
Ford Harrison — Bhi 
Forman Tom — L 
Formes Carl Jr 
Forrest Allan — Am 
Forrester Mel 8— Dct 

U 
Foster Henry D 
Foster J Morris 
Fox Harry 
France Chaa H — Dct 
Francis Burt 
Francis Thelma — U 
Franck John L 
Franck Katherlne— M 
Francis Alec Bud — 

Wld 
Franey Wm — U 
Frank J Herbert 
Franklin C M— Dct F 
Franklin 8 A — Dct F 
Frans Jos J — Dct B ft 

R 
Fraunhols Fraunie — 

M 
Frasee Edwin A— Dot 

F 
Frederick Pauline — FP 
French Chas K— I 
French Geo B — Chr 
Frelbus Theo — As 
Frost Lorraine — M 
Fuller Dale — Key 
Fuller Mary 
Fulton Helen 



Gaden Alex — Gau 
Gall Jane— U 
Gale Alice— F 
Gallagher Raymond 
Gamble Fred A— Nes 
Garden Mary — Gol 
Garwood Wm — Dct U 
Gaston Mae — Hor 
Gavette Marie — Hor 
Gay Chas — Hor 
Gaye Howard — Con 
Gebhardt Geo M 
George Burton — Dct U 
George Geo 
George Maude — U 
Gerald Pete— LKO 
Gerald Wm H 
Gerber Neva — U 
Gerard Carl 
Oerrard Douglas — Dct 

U 
Gcttlnger Billy— Pal 
Olblln ChaB— Dct 
Gibson Ed— U 
Gibson Grace 
Gibson Helen— K 
Gibson Jan Edwin — F 
Gibson Margaret 
Gilbert Jack C— I 
Ollhprt Wm 
/vtjYcrhor' far— bo,-> _ - 
G tilt- lie Win— Gol 
Gillies Simon P 
Gillespie Albt T— Key 
Gilstrone Arvld E — 

Dct Key 
Ollmore Helen— K 
Gllmore Paul 



Glrard Joa W— U 
Glrardot Bticne 
Glsh Dorothy— FA 
Gish Lillian— FA 
Glaum Louise— FA 
Glaaamayer Albert— 

Dct Key 
Gleason Adda 
Glendon J Fk— Kol 
Glocker Chaa P 
Godfrey Ray — Vim 
Golden Olive F— U 
Gonxales Myrtle— U 
Goodrtoh Edna 
Goodrich Kath— 8 
Goodwin Fred— L8 
Goodwin Nat C— NCG 
Gordon Alice 
Gordon Harris — And 
Gordon Julia 8 — Vi 
Gordon Leo— Ed 
Gordon Kitty- Wld 
Gordon Paul — M 
Gore Rosa — Kl 
Gorman Jaok — Dct ' 
Gould S Chas 
Grattan Stephen — F 
Grandon Ethel — Erb 
Grant Clay 
Grant Sydney 
Grant Valentine — FP 
Gray Betty— U 
Gray Donald— VI 
Gray Robt H— L 
Gran Albert 
Gray Olga 
Grandon Francis J — 

Dot U 
Grant Corinne 
Greeley Evelyn — Wld 
Greenwood Barcett-+F 
Greene Helen — Mu 
Green Al — Dct 8 
Green Dorothy — In 
Green Joa P — U 
Greene Kempton 
Qrene Margaret — U*XJ 
Greenwood Winifred-— 

Am 
Grelner Geo G — Dct F 
Grey Doris — Th 
Grey R Henry— bog 
Grey Jane — In 
Grey Katherlne 
Gribbon Harry— Key 
Griffin Frank C — Dct 

Key 
Griffith Beverly— Dct 

U 
Orlfflth David W— pet 

T 
Griffith Kath— LKO 
Griffith Linda A— Pew 
Griffith Ray— Key 
Grimmer Frk — Dct Th 
Oriscl Louis R— Wld 
Grlswold Jas— L 
Gules Thos 8—1 

H 

Haddock Wm F— Dct 

Goth 
Hahan Phil— In 
Halnea Robt T 
Hale Allen 

Hale Albt W— DotJUt 
Hale Creighton — Ffw 
Hall Ella— U 
Hall Howard 
Hall James— FP 
Hall Albert 
Hall J Robertson— FA 
Hall Louis L 
Hall Shirley 
Hallam Henry 
Hajloway Carroll 
Halloway Jack — Dot 

Am 
Han Harry — Chr 
Hamilton Gilbert P— - 

Dct Cen 
Hamilton Jack— Key V 
Hamilton Lillian— VY 
Hamilton Toyd V— 
Hamilton Mahlon 
/Hamper Gene v lev. 
Hamilton < Shorty — 
Ham 11 Lucille B 
Hands Bert— Dct 
Handworth Octavia 
Hanlon Alma — An 
Hanna Glorlne — Eft 
Hansen Juantta — U 
Hanson Frk 
Hanson Gladys 
Hardest? Vlolette 

Mllo 
Hare Francis — P 
Hardin Nell— boa 
Harding Guy — boa 
Hardy Oliver N — V 
Harlan Kenneth 
Harlan Macey 
Harlan Otis 
Harley Edw'n— FA 
Harris Caroline 
Harris Leon ore — P £ 
Harrison A, Jr — Dct] 
Harrison Estelle — R^ 
Hart Wm 8—1 
Hartford/ David— Dct 
Hartlgan P C— Dct L. 
Hartman Ferris — Dos 

Key 
Harron Robt — FA 
Harvey Harry — Dct 

boa 
Harvey John — Dct 
Hastings Carrey— Th 
Hatton Ray— L 
Havens Mildred— Wld 
nftwley Ormte - , . 
!fayd< n -Km'iV-^RoI 
Havdon J Chas — Dct 

ES 
Hayes Frk — Key 
Hayes Jno J— Dct 
Hayes Tommy 
Hayes Walter A 
Hayakawa Sessue — L 



r'f- 



4 V AUXB-T-Y 



= 



—21. 



Hay ward Lillian— 8 
Hears Bdward— U 
Heaalet Bra— LKO 
Herbert Henry J— F 
Heenaan Viator— Dct 
Kay 

Kaffroa T- Nn-rlVt aw. 
Held Anna 
Hennbery Joe — FA 
Henderson Luolus — 

Dct 
Henley Hobart— U 
Henry Gale— U 
Hernandez Mrs Geo— 

U 
Herring Aggie— I 
Herabolt Jean R— U 
Hera Ralph— M 
Heaaer Caut Edw B— 

Dct 
Heyes Herbert H— P 
Hickman Howard— T 
Higby Wilbur— Con 
Hlers Walter— M 
Hill Lee— U 
Hilliard Harry— F 
Hill Maud 

Hill Robert F— Dct U 
Hinckley Wm L 
Hines John— Wld 
Hitchcock Walter 
Hite Violet— Th 
Hoffman Otto F 
Hoffman Ruby 
Holding Thomas— Pal 
Holland Cecil C— S 
Holllngaworth Al 
Hollis Hylda— Am 
Holllstei Alice— K 
Hollywood B— Dct Plo 
Holmes Stuart— F 
Holmes Gerda— Wld 
Holt Bd— M 
Holies Helen — Mu 
Holt Geo— VI 
Hoi ton Betty 
Holubar Allen J— U 
Hood Robt E L— Milo 
Hoops Arthur — M 
Hopkins Clyde B— FA 
Hopper Bdna W— Wld 
Hopper B Mason — 

Dct-Mor 
Hopper DeWolf— FA 
Horan Chas — Dct-M 
Home Jas W — Dct-K 
Hotley Mae 
Housman Arthur — Th 
Howard Ernest — Th 
Howard Harold 
Howard Warda — Es 
Howe Betty— In 
Howell Alice— LKO 
Howell W A— Dct 
Howley Irene — M 
Hoyt Ed N— Eq 
Huff Louise — F P 
Hugglns Robt T 
Hulette Gladys — Th 
Hullng Leraine 
Human Billy— U 
Humphrey Oral — Dct- 

Am 
Humphrey Wm J — Dct 
Hunt Irene — U 
Hunt Jay — Dct-Nymp 
Hunter Kenneth — Fox 
Hunting Harry L 
Hurley Julia 
Hurst Paul C— Sig 
Hutchison Craig — Dct- 

LKO 
Hutchison Wm 
Hutton Lucille— LKO 
Hyland Peggy — VI 

I 

Illian Isolde C— Th 
Illington Margaret— 

FP 
Ince John — Dct 
Ince Ralph — Dct Gol 
Ince Thoa H — Dct T 
Ingraham Harrish — 

Hor 
Ingraham Lloyd — U 
Ingram Carl 
Ingram Rex 
Inokuchl Makato — boa 
Irving Geo— Dct-Fro 
Irving Wm— LKO 
Ivans Blaine 
Ivey Luclbelle 

J 

Jaccard Jacques— Dct 

U 
Jackson Joa 
Jackson Orrln — U 
Jamison Wm B — Ro 
James Gladden — As 
Janecke Job — Chr 
Jefferson Thoa — U 
Jefferson Wm W — L 
Jelley Herbert B 
Jennings De Witt C — 

Fox 
Jensen Bulalle — VI 
Jewett Ethel 
Jobaon Ed— boa 
Johnson Bthel — IT 
Johnson Emery — U 
Johnson Mabel — I 
'Johnstown J W — M 
Johnson Tefft — Dct-F 
Jonasson Frk — K 
Jonea Fred C 
Jones Fred R — Dct 8 

NF 
Jones J Parks— L 
Jones Rich— Dct MS' 
Jose Edouard — Dct P 
Joseph Marie — Milo 
Joslyn Margart 
Joy Ernest — I 
Joy Ernest C — I 
Joyce Alice — VI 
Ji'llan Rupert — Blu 
Junior John — Es 



K 

Kaelred Kath 
Kalich Bertha— F 
Kane Gall— Mu 
. Karr Darwin — Es 
Kaufman Keg — Dct Art 
Kaufman Jos — Dct FP 
Kefe Zena V 
Keenan Frk— I 
Keene Mattle 
Kellar Gertrude 
Kellard Ralph— P 
Kaller Bklyn— F 
Kellermann Annette — 

F 
Kelly Dorothy— Vi 
Kelly Jas T— LS 
Kelly Paul 
Kemble Lillian 
Kennedy Aubrey M — 

Dct 
Kennedy Ed— Key 
Kennedy M — Key 
Kennedy Leo A — F 
Kent Chas— Vi 
Kent Crawford 
Kenton Earl C — Key 
Kenyon Doris — Es 
Kernan Henry — Dct 

Vog 
Kerrigan Jack W — U 
Kerr R P— Dct Key 
Kilgour Jos— Vi 
Kimball Ed G 
Kimball Pauline G— 

So 
King Anita— L 
King Burton— Dct M 
King Carlton S— Dix 

M 
King Henry— Diet boa 
King Leslie 
King Mollie— Wld 
Kingsburg Gladys 
Kingston Winifred 
Kirk Anne — Es 
Kirkby Olle 
Kirkland David— Dot 

LKO 
Kirk wood James — Dct 

Mu 
Kirtley Virginia 
Kleine Robt 
Knoth Howard R— 

LKO 
Kolb Wm— Mu 
Kolker Henry— Kl 
Kortman Robt — I 
Kroman Anne 
Kuszewski Hcdda 

L 
Labadle Florence— Th 
La Bey Louie 
Lackaye Ruth — boa 
Laldlaw Roy — w/pm 
Lamber Laden G — 

Dct / 

Lampe Ralph C — Dct 

Am 
Lampton Dee — K 
Lancaster John — 8 
Landla Margaret C 
Langdon Lillian — FA 
Langley Bd — Dct 
La Rayne Baryne — 

Milo 
La Reno Dick— U 
Larkin Dolly 
Larkln Geo A — K 
Law Burton — U 
Law Walter — F 
Lawrence Ed — Dot 
Lawrence Jeanette 
Lawrence Paul — M 
Lawrence W B — Cor 
Lederer Gretchen — U 
Lederer Otto— VI . 
Lee Chas 
Lee Jennie 
Lee Joe 
Lee Joe— F 
Lee Virginia 
Le Guere Geo 
Lehman L Thoa 
Lehrmann Henry — Dct 
Levler Frlti — F 
Leigh Lisle— F 
Lelghton Lillian— L 
Lehnberg John H — Th 
Le Nard Madeline— F 
Leon Pedro 
Leonard Robt — Dct L 
Leone Henry 
Le Roy Elisabeth— M 
I/Estrange Julian — FP 
LeSalnt Ed J— Dct L 
Le Solr Geo— Dct 
Lester Louise— Am 
L'Estrange G 8 — Dct 
Leslie Dick— VI 
Leslie Marguerite 
Lessey Geo A — Dot 
Leveling Jas 
Levering Jos — Dct 
Lewis Edgar — Dot 
Lewis Ida 
Lewis Kath— VI 
Lewis Jessie — Wld 
Lewis Ralph — FA 
Lewis Sheldon — Pow 
Lewis Vera 
Lewis Will— Dct Vim 
Llgon G G — Key. 
Lincoln E K— Wld 
Lincoln Elmo— FA 
Llndblon Sadie 
Linden Elnar 
Llnder Max — Es 
Llnkey Harry * 
Lipson Ruth — Rol 
Little Anna 
L!U!efit!d t^.crk-t:. 
Livingston Jack— KB 
Lloyd Ethel 
Lloyd Frank— Dct F 
Lloyd Harold C— Ro 
Locknev J P 
Lockwood Harold— M 
Lone Walter 
Lonsdalo Harry G— S 



Lorens John 
Lorraine Lillian 
Lou-Tellegen — L 
Louie Willard— F 
Love Bessie — FA 
Love Montagu — Pal 
Lovely Louise— U 
Lowry Wm A— U 

Luby Bdntf— ft 

Luoaa Herman 
Loess Wilfred— FA 
Lund O A C— Dct 
Lather Anna — F 
Luttlnger Al 
Lydon Clarry— Key 
Lyons Eddie— U 
Lyman Laura 
Lynne Ethel— Chr 

M 

Mace Fred— Key 
MacDermott Marc — VI 
MacDonald Donald — 

Dct U 
MacDonald J F — Dot 

Key 
MacDonald Sherwood 

Dct Key 
MacDonald Flora — 

Nat 
MacBower Lulu — boa 
Mackenzie D— Dct 
Mackin Wm— S 
MacLaren Mary — Blu 
MacLean Douglas 
Mack Hayward- U 
Mackay Chas 
Mackey Edward 
MacQuarrie Albert — U 
Macquarrie Murdock 

Dct 
Maddern Jos— Dct LP 
Madison Cleo— U 
Malles Chas H— U 
Mason Billy — Mu 
Mason Edmond 
Mason John 
Malone Molly— U 
Malone Violet— U 
Maloney Leo D — Dct 
Manley Marie 
Mann Frankie 
Mann Hank — F 
Mann Harry — U 
Manning Mildred— Vi 
Mantell Robert B 
Mantell Robt B Jr 
Marcus Jas A — F 
Marlowe Geo W — Th 
Marlnoff Fanla 
Markey Enid— I 
Marks Lou S— Milo 
Marsh Mae — FA 
Marsh Gene — Ro 
Marsh Margaret — FA 
Marshall Geo B— Dct 

U 
Marshall Boyd— Th 
Marshall Tully— L 
Marston Theodore M 

—Dct Vi 
Martin Mary — F 
Martin Vivian— Mor 
Mason Jackie 
Mason Louis 
Mason Sidney L 
Mason Billy — F 
Matthews Sis 
Matthews Arthur W 

— NI 
Maupin Ernest — Es 
Maurice Mary B— VI 
Maude Arthur — Dct 
Maxam Louella — Key 
Mayall Herschel — F 
Maye Jlmsy — boa 
Mayo Christine — Got 
Mayo Edna — Es 
Mayo Frank — boa 
Mayo Melvln — Dct 
McCabe Harry — Am 
McCarthy Myles — Dct 
McComas Ralph 
McConnell Molly — boa 
McCord Mrs Lewis — L 
McCormack Frank — 

Dct Mu 
McCoy Harry — Key 
McCoy Gertrude 
McCoy Kid 
McCullough Phllo— 

boa 
McDaniels Geo W 
McDowell Claire— U 
McDermott John W — 

Dct U 
McDonald Francis J 

—Dct U 
McGarry Garry 
McGlll Lawrence B— 

Dct Ar 
MoGlynn Frank 
McGowan John P — 

Dot 
McGrall Walter— VI 
McGregoi Gordon— 

Hor 
McQuIre Paddy — Vog 
Mcintosh Burr 
McKee Raymond — M 
McKey Wm— K 
McKIm Ed— Dct 
McKlm Robt— FA 
McLaughlin Florence 

—Vim 
McMackln Archer — 

Dct 
McNamara Walter— 

Dct 
McBruce Bruce 
McRae Henry A — Dct 

IT. 
M?s* Lydla M--fi 
Meagher J L — F 
Melghan ThoR L 
Mel ford Geo W — Dct L 
Meredith Lois 
Mcrrlan Paulino 
Mersch Mary — L 
Mersrreau Violet — U 
Mcstaycr Harry — S 



Metcalfe Earle — Dct 
Meyers Edwin — Dct 
Michaelis Fred 
Midgley Fanny — I 
Myles Pat W— Bm 
Miller Ashlay— Dct FP 
Miller Chas- Dct I 
Miller Rent— Vog 
Wilier Waiter— Field 
Mills Ed A 
Mills Frk 

Mills Thomas— Dct VI 
Mineau Charlotte— LS 
Minter Mary M — Am 
Mitchell Doris 
Mitchell Rhea— Am 
Mitchell Yvctte— U 
Mix Tom— Dct S 
Mohan Earl J— Ro 
Monohan Jos — Juv 
Mong Wm B— Dct U 
Montague Fred 
Montgomery Frk B— 

Dct Con 
Moon Arthur — Mu 
Moon Arthur M — Vog 
Moore Eugene W — Th 
Moore Jos — LKO 
Moore Matt— U 
Moore Owen — FP 
Moore Marcia — U 
Moore Victor — L 
Moore Lucian — F 
Moran Pauline— Key 
Moreno Antonio — VI 
Moree Max 
Moran Lee — Dct U 
Mordant Ed — Dct 
Morhange Marcel H — 

Dct CKY 
Morey Harry T— VI 
Morley Jay 
Morris Dave 
Morria Lee — F 
Morris Reggie — Key 
Morris Richard— "J 
Morrison Jas W — Iv 
Mortimer Edmund— 

Dct CKY 
Mortimer Henry 
Mower Jack— WV1 
Mulhall Jack— U 
Mullen Gordon D 
Mullen H G 
Murdoch Henry — K 
Murname Allan — Wh 
Murpsy Chas B — U 
Murray Chas — Key 
Murray Mae — FP 
Murdock Ann 
Musgrave Billy — U 
Myers Harry— Dct Vim 
Myll Louis— Dct Kl 

N 

Nansen Betty 
Natol Florence 
Naslmosa Alia 
Nellan Marshall— Dot 

L 
Nelll James— L 
Nelll Richard R— F 
Nellaon Jack— U 
Nelson J A— Dct 
Nelson Frances— Wld 
Nelson Margaret 
Neabltt Miriam A 
Neville Harry M 
Newton Chaa L— Am 
Newton Marie 
Nlcholls Fred 
Nlohoto Geo O— MN 
Nichols Marguerite— 

Ro 
Nigh Wm— Dot M 
NUlson Anna Q 
Noble John W— DctM 
Nolan Harry— U 
Norcrass Frk M 
Norden Virginia 
Normand Claire 
Normand Mabel— MN 
North Wilfred— Dct VI 
Northrop Harry 8 — 

VI 
Nowell Wedgewood — 

Blu 
Nowland Bugene— Dct 
Nye G R— U 

o 

Oaker Jane 
Oakman Wheleer — MN 
O'Brien Geraldlne 
O'Brien John B — Dot 

M 
O'Brien Bugene — Bs 
O'Connor Loyola — FA 
O'Connor Edward 
O'Connor Harry M— F 
O'Connor James — F 
Oland Warner — In 
O'Laughlln John C— 

VI 
Olcott Sidney — Dct 
Oliver Gay— L 
O'Nell. Nance— M 
O'Nell Barry— Dct 
Onnon Jas H— Milo 
Opperman Frk 
Orth Geo— Dct 
Orth Louise 
Osborne Jefferson — 

Hor 
O'Shea. Jas— FA 
Osterman Katharine 
Ostrlchle Muriel— Wld 
O'Sulllvan T— Dct Key 
Oswald Zamah— Dct 
Otto Henry — Dct M 
Overton Evart— VI 
Owen Seen a— Trl 

Owen Seena 

. .,. ........ p.. 

Page Earle — IT 
Paget Alfred— FA 
Palaegologus S C 
Palmer Pauline — U 
Panzer Paul— Mon- 
mouth 
Pardee Madeline 
Parello M de La 



Parke Wm Jr— Th 
Parmer Debore 
Parrott Chas — Dct F 
Parry Fayette 
Paton Stuart— Dct U 
Paul Val— Blu 
Pavis Marie 
Pawn Doris — F • 

Payne Llla 
Payson Blanche — Key 
Payton Gloria — boa 
Peacock Lillian— U 
Pearce George C — U 
Pearce Peggy — Key 
Pearce Vernon — M 
Pearson Virginia — F 
Peil Ed— F 
Pemberton Henry W — 

Gau 
Pemberton Kathleen B 

— Gau 
Penington Ann — FP 
Peres Manuel F— Eag 
Perlolat Geo E— Man 
Perley Chas G — U 
Perret Leonce — Dct 

Wld 
Peters Ed — boa 
Peters House— Wld 
Peters Thos K— Dct 

Wld 
Petrova Olga — M 
Peyton Lawrence R — 

Phlllpp Adolph— Wld 
Phillips Carmen — F 
Phillips Dorothy— U 
Phillips Sam— M 
Physloc Wary— Dct 
Pick ford Mary— Pic 
Plckford Jack— F P 
Pierard Jean P 
Pierrot Roger 
Pietz Lucille — boa 
Pixley Gus 
Plsyter Wellington — 

Con 
Polito Sol 
Pollard Harry — Ro 
Pollock Gabriel 
Potel Victor— Key 
Powell Frank — Dct 

Pow 
Powell Madeline 
Powell Paul — Dct FA 
Powell Rubs 
Power Tyrone 
Powers Lena 
Poynter Beulah 
Pratt Gilbert W— Ro 
Pratt John D— Dct 
Pretty Arllne— Vi 
Price Kate 
Prince Chas H— M 
Prior Herbert 
Proctor Geo D — Dct L 
Purvlance Enda O — L 

8 

Q 

Quirk Wm A— Dct M 
R 

Rader Wm E — FA 
Radford Masie 
Raerdon Jas — Lon F 
Ralph Jessie — P 
Rambeau Marjorie — M 
Rand John— LS 



. 



Randall Bruce 
Randolf Anders— VI 
Rankin Caroline 
Ratt?nberry Harry L 

—Chr 
Rawllnson Herbert — U 
Ray Al— Dct Cha 
Ray Chas — I 
Razeto Stella 
Rea Isabel 
Redmond Alma B 
Reed Wm W — boa 
Reed Walter C— F 
Reed Florence 
Reed Vivian— S 
Reeves Blllie— S 
Reeves Myrtle — boa 
Reeves Mary — boa 
Relcher Frk— Dct L 
Reid Jas H— Dct 
Reld Wallace— L 
Renee Alexy 
Revier Harry Dct 
Reynolds Carrie 
Reynolds Edna M — 

Vim 
Reynolds Lynn F — 

Dct Blu 
Rhodes Blllie — Chr 
Rich Vivian 
Richardson Frk A — 

Mor 
Richardson Jack — Am 
Rlchman Chas— VI 
Rlcketts Thos— Dct 
Rldgley Cleo— L 
Rldgway John H 
Ridgwell Geo — Dot 

Sun 
Riley Mrs B G— Dct 
Ritchie Fklyn— Mu 
Ritchie Fklyn— Am 
Ritchie Ethel A— boa 
Roach Gladys L — LKO 
Roach Bert — LKO 
Robertson John — Dct 

VI 
Robblns Marc — U 
Robblns Bdwlna 
Robertson John— Dct 

VI 
Roberts Bdlth— U 
Roberts Schuyler 
Roberts Theo— L 
Robert* Ed Z 
RobertPou- Lollta 
Robinson Gertrude M 
Robinson Walter C 
Robinson Alan — Dct 
Robson May 
Robson Phillip 
Roccardi Albert VI 
Rork Chas 
Rodin Emil — FP 



Rodney Earle — Key 
Rogers Dorothy 
Rogers Ruth— LKO 
Roland Ruth — boa 
Roland Fred 
Rooney Gilbert G — F 
Ross Cbss J 
Ross David O— Milo 
Ross Milton 
Ross Mary T — K 
Rossell Mayer J— Dct 

Nla 
Roason Helene— Am 
Rottman Victor Jr 
Routh Geo W— K 
Rowan Ruth— LKO 
Rage Billy— Vim 
Ruggles Wesley — Dct 

VI 
Russell Dan — LKO 
Russell Wm— Am 



Sack Nathaniel — Plo 
Sackett Jack— U 
Sackville Gordon — boa 
Sais Marin— K 
Salisbury Monroe — F 
Sampson Teddy — FA 
Sargent Geo L— Dct 

Am 
Sarno Hector Y — u 
Saunders Jackie — boa 
Santschi Thos — S 
Sawyer Doris — Par 
Sawyer Joan — F 
Saxe Templar — VI 
Schade Betty— Blu 
Schade Fritz — Key 
Schaefer Anne 
Scardon Paul— Dct VI 
Scbenck Earle O 
Schumm Harry W — 

LKO 
Scott Cyril 

Scott Sidney— Dct Mor 
Scott Wm— 8 
Scaly Lewis — M 
Searle Veta-*-Pow 
Seaver Joseph — boa 
Sears Alfred D — FA 
8eay Cbas M— Dct 
Sedgwick Eileen — IT 
Sedgwick E— U 
Sedgwick Jos — U 
Selgmann Geo — Dct F 

A 
Setter Chas H 
Setter Wm A— Dct 
Selbte Evelyn— IT 
Selby Gertrude — U 
Selby Norman 
Selwynne Clarissa — U 
Semon Lawrence — Dct 

vi 

Senwtit Mack— Dct 

Key 
Shattuck Truly 
8haw Brlnsley— Vi 
Shay Paula 
Shay Wm E— H B 
Sbea Wm— VI 
Sbeehan John — Am 
Shelby Miriam— U 
Sbepard Iva — Gau 
Sheridan Frk— Wld 
Sherrlll Jack— Fro 
Sherry J B— I 
8herwood Wm — Per 
Shields Ernie— U 
Shlpman Nell— L 
Shirley Arthur— I 
Short Antrim— U 
Short Gertrude— Ro 
8hotwell Marie— Th 
Shumway Leonard C 

— U 
Shumway Walter — Reg 
Siegel Bernard 
Sills Milton— In 
Sinclair Maud — F 
Singleton Jos B— M N 
Slsson Vera 
Skinner Otis 
Sloan Wm H 
Sloman Ed— Dct Am 
Smalley Phillips— Dct 

Blu 
8mlley Jos W — Dct 
Smith Bruce — boa 
Smith C Aubrey— Fro 
8mlth David— Dct VI 
Smith Hamilton— Dct 
tSmJtto ,Noel M— Dct 

LKO 
Smith Sidney C— 8 
Smith Vola— U 
Smythe Florence— L 
Snow Marguerite — M 
Sothern Joan — Art 
Southern Edw H— VI 
Southern Harry 
Summervllle George J 

— Key 
Spauldlng Nellie P— 

Th 
Spencer George 8 
Spencer Marvell 
Spencer Walter — Hor 
8plngler Harry — Iv 
8pong Hilda 
Standing Herbert— 

Mor 
Standing Jack— F 
Stanhope Ida 
Stanley Edwin — Th 
Stanley Forrest— Mor 
8tanley Henry 
Stanley Geo — Dct 
Stanmore Frk— Lon 
Stanton Fred R— M 
StfUJtan,. R.ftfi— : J>t F. 
Staunton Vfcgfofo 
Stedman Mvrtle — Mor 
Stedman Marshall — U 
Strger Julius 
Steppllng John— Pol 
Sterling Edith— Nev 
Stirling Ford — Dct 

Key 
Sterling Jos 



Sterling Rich— Dct U 
Stern Milton— St 
Storrett Lee — Dct U 
Ste veils Emily — M 
Stevens Howard 
Stevens Edwin — Dct 

Blu 
StevenBon Chas E — Ro 
Stewart Anita — VI 

Stewart Roy— " ""* 

Stinger Bill— Dct 
St John Al— Key 
Stockdale Carl— FA 
Storm Jerome — I 
Stonthoune Ruth — Blu 
8tout George W 
Storey Edith— \l 
Stowell Wm H— Am 
Stuart Julian— CKY 
Stull Walter H— Dct 

Vim 
Sturgeon Rollins — Dct 

Vi 
Stuart Dixie 
Stuart Jean — P 
Sullivan Dan— M 
Sullivan Joe 
Sullivan Fred— Dct Th 
Sully Janet M 
Suratt Valeska — F 
Sutherland Ed— Key 
Sutherland Victor 
Swain Mack — Key 
Swanson Gloria — Key 
Sweeney Peggy — Es 
Sweet Blanche — L 
Swickard Jos R — Key 

T 

Taliaferro Edith 
Taliaferro Mabel— M 
Talmadge Constance— 

FA 
Talmadge — NT 
Tapley Rose E — VI 
Taylor B F 
Taylor Lark— VI 
Taylor Wm D — Dct 

Mor 
Taylor Jean 
Tearle Conway — CKY 
Tea re Ethel— K 
Teichman Hans M — 

Dot 
Tellegen-Lou— FP 
Templeton Margaret — 

Vog 
Tempest Tom 
Tennant Barbara 
Terrisa Tom 
Terry Ethel G 
Terwtlliger Geo — Dct 
Tharp Norman — As 
Thatcher Evelyn — LS 
Thayer Otts B — Dct 
Theby Rosemary — Vim 
Thomaa Al F 
Thompson David H — 

Rol 

Thompson Harriet M 
—F 

Thompson Nicholas J 

— Erb 
Thompson Margaret — 

I 
Thompson Fred A — 

Dct VI 
Thome Frk A— Dct 

Am 
Thome Llzette— Am 
Thomas Nona — I 
Thurman Mary — Key 
Tldmarsh Ferd 
Tltjen Lester C— Dct 
Tietze Court— Hor 
Tighe Capt O F 
Tilton Ed B— Dct Lib 
Timayo Mlneto— In 
Tlncher Fay — FA 
Titheradge Dion— Wld 
Titus Lydla— U 
Todd Harry— Ro 
Tomak Jack— U 
Toncray Kate — FA 
Tooker Wm H — F 
Totten Jos B — Dct 
Tourneur Maurice— 

Dct Pick 
Travers Rich C — Es 
Tracey Thos F 
Tracy Bert— Vim 
Trask Weyland— Key 
Traverse Madeline— 

Wld 
Trevor 01 — Vi 
Tree Sir H B— FA 
Trimble Larry — Dct 
Truax Sarah 
Truex Ernest 
Trunnelle Mabel 
Truesdell Chas F— 

Wld 
Tucker Rich 
Tuey Bert 
Tulla Bella— Th 
Tully Ethel M 
Turner D H— Dct 
Turner Jeanette— FA 
Turner Florence 
Turner F A— F A 
Turner Otis — Dct F 
Turner Wm H 
Turpln Sally— U 
Turpln Sue— U 
Turpln Ben-Mu 

u 

TTllam Ethel— I 
Underhlll John G 
Ulrlch Leenore — L 

V 

Vale Louise 

Vale Travers— Dct Wld 

ValenJl»m Or» r ^__rp 

Va&yw!^; - . .. 

Valll Valll 

Van Buren Arch H— F 

Van Buren Mabel — L 

Van Husen Cortland — 

Dot VI 
Vane Denton— VI 
Van Epps Jack— Per 
Van Beatrice — Pol 



Van Polly 
Van Waily— VI 
Vauet Mabel 
Vaughn Robt — Th 
Vekroff Perry Dct VI 
Vernon Bobble — Key 
Vernon Agnes — Blu 
Vlgnola Robt li — Del 
Vincent Jas— Dct F 
Vincent Florence— I 
Vivian Robt 
Vokes Harry 
Von Meter Harry — Am 
Von Racen Dorothy — 

M 
Von Strohelm Erich — 

FA 
Von Schiller Carl— F 
Voss Frk H— LKO 
Vosburgh Al 

w 

Wadsworth Wm 
Walcott Helen— F A 
Walker Charlotte — 

McC 
Walker Lillian— VI 
Walker Marie L 
Walker Robt D— M 
Wall Dave 
Waller Emilie 
Waller Jane — Chr 
Walpole Stanley D— U 
Walsh Geo W— F 
Walsh R A— Dot F 
Walsh Tom— Dct U 
Walthall Henry B— Es 
Ward Fanny — L 
Ward Irene 
Ward Lillian 
Ward Lucile 
Ward Tom 

Warde B r C— Da Tk 
Wsrde Fred B— Th 
Ware Helen— S 
Warne Howard B Jr— 

U 
Warner H B— I 
Warner Marion 
Warrenton Lule — Dct 
Warwick Robert— 8el 
Washburn Bryant — Bs 
Watson Harry Jr— Kl 
Watson Roy 
Watt Nat* C— Dct 
Wayne Marie — As 
Wayne Willard— U 
Webb George — L 
Webb Hasel G — Dot 

Blu 
Webb Hazel O 
Weber Lois— Dct BItt 
Weer Helen 
Wehlen Emmy— M 
Welgel Paul — L 
Welch NUes 
Wellesley Chus~-Vl 
Wells Bstelle 
Wells L M— U 
Wells May— Key 
Wells Raymond — Bin 
Welsh W J— U 
Wendell Bunny 
West Chas H— 8 
West De Jalma — VI 
West Langdon— Dct 
West Lillian M— boa 
West Marlon 
West Olive 
West Ray D — Dct I 
Wharton Leo — Dct In 
Wharton Theo — Dct In 
Wheatcroft Stanhope 
Whlople Clara B— Wld 
White Glen— F 
White Leo— F 
White Pearl— P 
Whitman Fred — boa 
Whltmore Mlna 
Whitney Clare— F 
Whitsler Margaret— U 
Whitney Clare — F 
Whltson Frk— TJ 
Whltson Bernell P— U 
Wilbur Crane — Hor 
Williams Chas J— Dot 

VI 
Wlllams Clara— I 
Williams Grace 
Williams Earle— VI 
Williams Harry H— 

Dct Key 
Williams Kathlyn— 

Mor 
Williamson Robin B — 

Vim 
Wilson Ben — U 
Wilson Hal 
Wilson Lois— IT 
Wilson Marjorle— I 
Wilson Millard K— U 
Wilson Roberta — U 
Wilson Tom 
Wlnant Forrest 
Wlndom Laurence C— 

Dct Es 
Winter Perry— Dct 
Wise Thos A 
Wlthey Chester— Dct 

FA 
Witting Arthur E— U 
Wolfe Jane — L 
Wood Lawrence 
Woodruff Eleanor 8 
Woodward Mrs B 
Woodward Gill 
Woodward H Guy- 
Key 
Wolbert Wm— Dct VI 
Wool d ridge Doris — 

Wld 
Worthlngton Wm — Blu 
Wrf*ht Fred E— Dct 
■**.*• • ' - '■ - - 

Wright Helen— U 
Wright Walter— Dct 
Key 

Y 

Young Betty 
Young Clara K — CKY 
Young Jnm<>" — !>■♦ 
Younge Lucille — FA 



22 



FILM REVIEWS 



jt^,... -*AVw .... . . «i ■ —■ i ■ ■■ i * 



■ — ' . ■ ■ i . » 

GREED. 

Alma Nanoe O'Nell 

Bve Leslie Shirley Mason 

Adam Moore George Le Qnere 

"Doc" Denton Harry Norttarup 

Richard Cole , Robert. Elliott 

"Jlmmle" Hobson Alfred Hickman 

"Oreed" It described as a "ova-reel drama," 

featnrtni Nance O'Nell, belpg the third In the 

lfeClure Syndicate series released under the 

title "The Seven Deadly Sine." Theodore 

Marston directed the feature, and the pho- 
togrspby Is credited to Charles Qlbson. The 
■tory It tells la rather confusing, but it has 
a 4ne, full-crown "punch" — Indeed, the tale 
ls^ series of surprises, none too delicate In 
conception, but putting over the maximum of 



dramatic surprise and thrill. The effect Is 
something like that of the Paths aerials 
which are designed to deliver a battery of dra- 
matic climaxes without much regard to the 
vorJtleo. The film contains an endless suc- 
cession of highly colored Incidents, such as 
the appearance la a Wall street broker's office 
at midnight of an Innocent girl who Is the 
object of the broker's evil designs: a murder 
mystery, which Is the outgrowth of this same 
circumstance ; a prison scene, which goes right 
up to ths edge of the electric chair, and holds 
suspense at tip-toe, and several other epi- 
sodes of similarly moving character. Miss 
O'Nell screens particularly well in the emo- 
tional acenee and the minor characters, chief 
among whom are Shirley Mason and George 
Le Quere, do well. A novelty which should 
appeal to the women patrons of the picture 



houses Is a fashionable party at which ths 



to go out In men-end- woman 
pain, provided with only a dims and 



for adventure, the prise being awarded to the 
couple who flan return and report at mid- 
night the most Interesting experience. This 
idea Is neatly worked into the story and ths 
moral lesson of the title Is skilfully maneu- 
vered throughout to bring the text to the fore 
at the climax. The story has to do with a 
telephone girl In a bucket ahop who accepts 
a bribe In return for holding her tongue when 
her boss Is threatened with arrest and ths 
ill luck which followed her weakness In suc- 
cumbing to temptation. Miss O'Nsil plays 
the telephone girt most effectively. The pic- 
ture has several excellent "types," notable 
among them being the Judge in the trial 
scene. 


















The swirlirig life of this feunous Street 
of Fashion is shown in all its splendor, 
vanity, darirg and novelty, in the — 



i 



PHOTOPLAY 





TH$ EMPRESS OP 1 FASHION 

Gowns that will cause < — 

of Admiration and Vfender. 

Written by, Mara Murillo - 
- Directed by/ Kenean Buel 



Foxfilm Cotnedu Service 

R£L£AS£ raR Y/ttK Of fIbBUARY 5TH 

The Cloud Punches . 

£ w Hank • Mann w0 mis 

THE P1CTVRZ THAT MAKES THE JOHNSTOWN 
JOOOD LOOK LIKE A HEAVY D£ W. — 
FOXflLM COMEDIES ARE T&ltAttD WEEKLY. 
AVAILABLE ?OR ALL EXHIBITORS .- 
INDEPENDENT OE REGULAR EOX PROGRAM 



HER LIFE AND HIS. 

Mary Murdock Florence La Badle 

Ralph Howard H. B. Herbert 

Mra. Nan Travers .Etfcyle Cooke 

Bmmett Conger 8am Niblack 

Political Boss „ Justus L\ Bxrnos 

The Pathe concern leans to the conservative 
slds In the naming or this five-reel Oold 
Rooster featuring Florence La Badle. It was 
first called "The Olrl Who Wanted to Live." 
but that title probably aeemed to have a aez 
angle and waa changed. The picture la one 
of those "atoriee with a purpose," but In this 
case the purpose Is to Illuminate prison re- 
form rather than the time-worn subject, why 
girls go wrong. Both as to its text and the 
matter of the story the feature ia interesting. 
It is rich in incident and has plenty of ma- 
terial to fill out the length of footage. Pho- 
tography is fine, some of the light and shade 
effects, particularly in the early part, ere 
striking. The story: Mary Murdock (Miss 
La Badle), forced by circumstances to choose 
between the streets or theft, is caught break- 
ing into the home of Robert Howard. He 
wants to let the girl go, but his wife insists 
that she be punished and she la sent to prison. 
When ehe serves her term she seeks Howard 
out and asks him to aid her. He Is despond- 
ent and about to commit suicide because of 
bla wife'a desertion with another man, and 
the girl Is able to interest him in a novel 
scheme. She persuades him to use hla large 
fortune for the reclamation of convicts. The 
plan proves so successful that Howard wins 
the wardenahlp of a large prison, but a cor- 
rupt political ring, dissatisfied with the hon- 
esty of his administration, tries to blackmail 
him. Mary's institution finds a way to How- 
ard's vindication asm she wins in a battle of 
wits with the dishonest politicians and leads 
to the victory of the man she loves over the 
forces of evil and the finale leaves the specta- 
tor with the prospective of a happy ending. 

REWARD OF THE FAITHLESS. 

Princess Dlone Claire Du Bray 

Katerina Vlaaoff Betty Sehade 

Prince Paul Ragosln Richard La Reno 

Guldo Capanelll Wedgewood Nowell 

Feodor Strogoff Nicholas Duneaw 

Peter Vlaeoff William J. Dyer 

Magnus Ingleton wrote "The Reward of 
The Faithless," which is a etory of intrigue 
and death, carrying home the old punch line 
of 'The Wages of Bin Ia Death, b'gosh." 
The tale was filmed under the direction of 
Rex Ingram, who has turned out a worthy 
production, and baa been released as a Blue- 
bird feature. The detail In the early part of 
tbe picture is remarkable and the exterior 
scenes are unusually good. In the cast Bettie 
Qchade and Wedgewood Nowell are featured, 
one aa the "vamp" and the other as the 
heavy, but the two outstanding roles In the 
production are those that are played by Clair* 
Du Bray and Nicholas Duneaw, The latter Is 
particularly good aa the rejected lover of 
tbe Princess Dlone, who pasaee him up to wed 
tbe villain of the plot. There are moments 
In the plcturlsatlon that border on the sen- 
sational, and there ia one scene In particular, 
showing the seduction of "vamp" as a young 
girl, that ia cleverly told without the aid of 
the title. Just how this scene will get by the 
censors remains to be seen, but Is done in- 
geniously ar* dr'-cs home the desi ed jus- 
gestlon very strongly. "The Reward of the 
Faithless," while not a feature of the first 
line, Is one that will get a lot of money and 
should be particularly strong on foreign rights 

Fred. 

THE HONETLESS HONEYMOON. 

Klever Pictures, Inc. (Paramount ^ts show- 
ing a very fast comedy one-reeler at the 
Strand this week, with Victor Moore aa the 
star. It is one of the best comedy single 
reelers ever produced, giving Moore Just the 
sort of opportunity necessary for the projec- 
tion of his peculiar brand of humor. It is 
called "The Honeyless Honeymoon," and was 
written by Edward McWade, evidently with a 
view to taking advantage of the recent trip 
of the Klever Pictures Co. on Its way to Jack- 
sonville via boat. Moore Is seen first aa a 
bachelor about to be married. The ceremony 
takes place and he starts on his honeymoon. 
His friends read of a big Jewel robbery 7 and 
write an anonymous letter to the police In- 
forming them that the culprits are Moore and 
his wife, who are pretending to be a honey- 
moon couple and sailing that day on the Jack- 
sonville beat. The titles are screamingly 
funny and the farcical situations very natural 
In the matter of probability. Underlying It 
all there Is a strong melodramatic plot, but 
always progressing in Its unfolding In divert- 
ing comedy fashion. j lo. 

Injunction for Control 

Grand Rapids, Jan. 31. 
Following an injunction suit, result- 
ing in the ousting of Frank Powers as 
manager of the Isis theatre, George 
Nichols has been installed there. 

It was alleged Powers and the les- 
sor of the theatre, Harry I. Garson of 
Detroit, were negotiating with the Gil- 
ligham & Smith interests for films 
which Goodspeed claims were origin- 
- ally booked for »jie: Isis. Gars'oir has 
the state rights of some of the big Selz- 
nick films. Gilligham & Smith control 
the Majestic Gardens, Strand, Orpheum 
.jyid other picture theaters here . 



Fit M R E V IE W S 



23 



= 



KICK IN. 

Paths Is releasing this dre-retl feature 
vhloh wsb produced by A. H. Woods, tor the 
screen, with llolllo King and William Cour- 
tensy fs*tured~ . Ut wooAm origin*' 1 * pre- 
sented the plooo on the stage at the Republlo 
last season.^ In film form ths WUlard Maok 
play Is for mors gripping Mian It was In the 
original, although tho finish of tho story Is a 
little weak. But up to almost tho final min- 
ute the story holds the Interest at a ferer 
heat with the two principal characters stand- 
ing out exceptionally well in the roles as- 
signed to them. There has been added some- 
thing of a prolog to the picture showing the 
early enTlronment of the hero of the story* 
As the two youths, ' who impersonate the 
youthful Chick and Bennle. grow up and 
when about fourteen, are the leaders of a 
■treet gang, there is a certain amount of 
comedy that lands with the audience. Later 
when Chick and Bonnie are full grown and 
still continue their way as crooks, there are 
sereral scenes full of human interest, and a 
corking fight or two. "Kick In" Is a feature 
that will pull money anywhere. It carrying 
a strong combination of names for the ex- 
hibitor to work on. A. H. Woods, WUlard 
Mack, Mollis King, William Courtenay and 
the title of the piece Itself which, because of 
its recent and fairly successful stage produc- 
tion, should awake Interest. 



ME AND ME PAL 

Labby Hubert Willis 

Mammy Sidney Falrbrother 

Lancelot By Himself 

Flash Hawkins Lewis Gilbert 

Harry Maaterman Gerald Ames 

James Hllllard Douglas Munro 

Mrs. Kingsland Gwynne Herbert 

Kitty Bdna Flugrath 

This is a four part Unlrerssi-Red Feather 
release that was made in England by the 
London Film Co. Ltd., the same company 
which has been turning out the Florence Tur- 
ner features that were released by the Mutual. 
This picture la, howersr, better than the ear- 
.ller releases. It Is a story of tho oostermong- 
ers. of London, and abroad it is called "Me and 
Me Moke," the moke being the little burro, or 
Jass-ax, that draws the peddler's cart. The 
picture Is unusually well put on, considering 
where /it was turned out, and the story by 
Richard Ganthony contains some real heart 
Interest and a genuine touch of pathos here 
and there. Harold Shaw was the directing 
producer. Hubert Willis and Sydney Fair- 
brother, the former as Labby, the Coster, and 
the latter as his wife, present the host charac- 
terisations of the cast, tho other plaj<ui aro 
passing fair in the roles assigned to them. Of 
course the "moke" Is Just himself, but he 
seems to be a well trained animal who wins 
an occasional laugh for himself. There is 
a light lore story, of the type so dear to the 
English, that runs through the main theme, 
and which, erentually arriTee at tho logical 
conclusion. This is a Tory good program 
feature. Fn&. 

INDISCRETION. 

"Indiscretion" is a flTO-part Vltagraph re- 
lease starring Lillian Walker. It Is an excel- 
lent production, but there are many errors of 
direction and the story is altogether incon- 
sistent. Miss Walker portrays the daughto of 
a wealthy father, a book-worm, who derotee 
small attention to his daughter's rearing. «Ue 
* Is a hoyden and romps about with unrestrained 
abandon. At the opening she is shown bath- 
ing in a creek in a one-piece suit, oblivious of 
any sense of modesty. Her father dies and 
she lives alone in a big house with a ohaper- 
onage other than that accorded by tho serv- 
ants. That is all wrong. A girl In her position 
in life, with numerous friends of tho better 
class, would have been taught tho necessity for 

{>roper protection. Through her Innocence she 
a trspped into visiting a roadhouse at night 
in company of a married man, whoso wife 
having him watched by detectives, with tho 
suit she Is named as one of the series of oo- 
spondents in the wife's suit for divorce. It is 
all cleared up in the end and she marries an 
estimable young man. But It is ridiculous to 
ask one to believe that a private detective 
would be permitted to mingle with the guests 
of an exclusive country dub by merely re- 
questing the privilege of the club's steward. 
Then, again, at the club, high balls aro not 
served to ladles sod gentlemen guests the 
moment they are seated, without even being 
ordered. The whole thing savors of careless- 
ness in the matter of detail. Jolo. 



HIS SWEETHEART. 

Joe Plcarrl G orgs Beben 

Mamma Mia Sarah Kernan 

Trina Caplno Helen Jerome Eddy 

Godfrey Kelland Harry Devere 

Mrs. Kelland Kathleen Klrkham 

"His Sweetheart," a Moroaco (Paramount) 
production, written by Lawrence McCloskey, 
directed by Donsld Crisp, la a composite of 
comedy and melodramatic photplay acting. 
Its main defect Is the constant ovsr-rhapso- 
dislng by the star, George Beben. He has 
lots of magnetism on the screen, end with a 
slight curbing of his tendency to over-act, 
ahould rank as sn excellent film star. There 
Is absolutely nothing new In ths story, its 
Interest being confined to the splendid atmos- 
pheric details. Most of the comedy earned 
plenty of laughter at tbe 8trand Isat Sunday 
■ulijlrt, but whttii the Btor> "<S*opp£d. i\He Alve-. 
cltal of tbe harrowing details of an elderly 
Italian woman wrongfully accused of theft, 
being locked up, pieced on trial and con- 
victed, the audience yawned and shifted about 
with every Indication of boredom. "Hla 
Sweetheart" would make a nice, fast three- 
reeler. j lo. 



THE RIGHT DIRECTION. 

Polly Bodes Vivian Martin 

Kirk Drummond Colin Chaso 

John Drummond Herbert Standing 

Big Bill. V. r... Alfred Holltngsworth 

Harry Lockwood Billy Mason 

Billy Boy Baby Jack White 

Pathetically inconsistent in every degree this 
Paramount feature fairly breathse the nickel- 
odeon atmosphere, adding to Its many imper- 
fections one of the worst specimens of photog- 
raphy seen hereabouts in many moons. The 
theme is based on a ridiculous foundation and 



Is dragged through the several reels with little 

or no regard to common sense, the director 

rushing to the meet Insane extremes to give 

the feature s mslodramatlo touch. Vivian 

ttartftriplsys- the iread. t child «rf the slums 
whose younger brother (Baby Jack White) is 
in danger of death. A physloisn advises the 
child that little Billy must seek a healthier 
clime and suggests California. Then comes 
the most nonsensical routine of film adventure 
that has ever been projected on a screen. The 
little girl (she looks about seven) packs all 
her earthly belongings In a baby carriage and 
begins to wheel Billy Boy across the con- 
tinent. She strikes a hobo camp and the 
yeggs take care of the pair, one hobo being 



kind enough to lock them in a freight car 
for safe keeping. Just as they are about to 
succumb for want of food and water they are 
rescued by the Inevitable mllionaire'a aon 
wbo bappena to be ruahlng wildly acroes tbe 
cuuutry in a high pxr* feted xuacuiue. They 
are taken to bis father's borne and after many 
additional complications the affair la finally 
adjusted. The coloring Is Impossible, the 
greateat part of the reel running to darkness. 
It's probably one of the poorest featurea ever 
released by Paramount, and the surprising 
thing la that Paramount, which claims a high 
standard, should have Issued such a poor pic- 
ture in preference to keeping it on the shelves. 
Even in a nickelodeon, "The Right Direction" 
would look wrong. Wynn, 



I 



« 

M c Clure Pictures has kept its Promise! 

SEVEN DEADLY SINS 






The greatest Maney - Maker you ever bavked 

Read what the Critics say: 



Edward Weitzel, The Moving Picture World 

"Full of the liveliest sort of action. 
* * * Deft touches of characters, brief 
sidelights that reveal intimate and unexpect- 
ed bits of life, and progressive movement of 
plot are to be found in this picture-play." 

Peter Milne, Motion Picture News 

"The casual passer-by whose eye may be 
arrested by the hectic words 'Seven Deadly 
Sins,' and who confides to himself, 'By 
Golly, I'd like to see one of 'em,' will by no 
means be disappointed in 'Envy.' Like as 
not he will become a permanent patron of 
the theatre, eagerly seeking the other six 
of the series. * * * 'Snappy stuff' 
just about sums up the five reels." 

A. G. S., Dramatic Mirror 

"If 'Envy' with Ann Murdock is represen- 
tative of the series, the release of this chain 
of plays should be eagerly watched for by 
the exhibitors." 



Agnes Smith, The 



Telegraph 



"A quick moving modern drama with two 
charming actresses and a likable actor. 

* * * The series gets a flying start. 

* * * A heap of melodramatic thrills. 

* * * A human note is struck early in 
the picture. * * * It would be hard to 
find a production better equipped in the way 
of players/" 

Exhibitor's Trade Review 

"The exhibitor must not treat lightly the 
value of the publicity and advertising car- 
ried in the McClure publications. Much 



curiosity must have been aroused in the pub- 
lic mind concerning 'Seven Deadly Sins.' 

* * * 'Envy' must be pronounced in- 
teresting." 

Variety. ("Envy") 

« 

"A wealth of melodrama with a punch. 

* * * There is a whale of a battle be- 
tween a hired gunman and the millionaire. 

* * * Tij e f ans w ju wan t to know what 

happened to the characters after the film 
ceases." 

Variety. ("Pride") 

* "For action and melodramatic interest it 
far outdoes the first of the septet. * * * 
The story is packed to the last inch of ca- 
pacity with action. * * * If the Mc- 
Clue people can keep up the pace they have 
set in No. 2 for the rest of the seven, they 
should find a ready market." 

Harriette Underbill, New York Tribune 

"If the 'Seven Deadly Sins' continue to be 
made so attractive, it is going to be difficult 
to say 'Get thee behind me.' 



>» 




Laurence Reid, Motion Picture Mail 

"The story is happily not a preachment 
nor does it present, ostentatiously, a moral. 

* * * The incidents are forged together 
with a fine regard for sequence and without 
losing sight of the fact that suspense and 
animation must be dominant throughout. 

* * * A tale abounding in thrilling ac- 
tion. * * * All in all, other manufac- 
turers should 'Envy' the McClure Company." 



Mc Clure Series Dept, 

Triangle Distributing Carpar&tion, 

1499 Bra ad way. New York City. 






**c 



~ ± 



24 



FILM R EVIEWS 



THE COURAGE OF SILENCE. 

Mercedes Alice Joyce 

Bradley Harry T. Morey 

Bobby Willie Johnson 

Baby Mildred May 

Aiiee • • -C«^ Ayr** 

Hammond Robert Gaillard 

Saunders Walter McOrall 

Alice Joyce and Harry T. Morey are the 
stars of this five reel Vltagraph' feature, which 
was written by Milton Nobles and directed 
by William P. S. Earle. The story Is a little 
slow in starting, but once underway holds 
the sustained interest of the audience. The 
lightings throughout are particularly good and 
the cast was well selected. The action of the 
story is laid in three countries. America. Eng- 
land and Prance. The Bradley family lire 
in America. There Is the husband, wife and 
two children. All are happy until Bradley is 
sent to England, where he meets and becomes 
Infatuated with the wife or the Spanish 
• Ambassador She returns his affection not 
knowing he Is married. After he has re- 
turned to America she sends blm a miniature 
of herself. This acta as a magnet to draw 
him back. Her husband Is frightfully jeal- 
ous and when he discovers her riding in the 
company of Bradley, he confronts her with 
the fact that she is in lore with the American 
and thrashes her with her riding crop. She 
leaves him and goes to Bradley and together 
they leave for the continent. While crossing 
the Channel he confesses the fact that he Is 
a married man, and when they reach Calais 
she eludes him, later entering a convent. He 
Is so Infatuated that he remains abroad look- 
ing for her. In America Mrs. Bradley receives 
a letter written by her husband, Informing 
her of his Intended elopement with the Spanish 
beauty. Later the Bradley family comes to 
Prance In company with the wife's father. 
The wife and the two children are taken ill 
the physician obtains a nun from & nearby 
convent to nurse them. Of course It la Mer- 
cedes (Alice Joyce) the girl who eloped with 
the father. She naturally effects a rseoncl-. 
llatlon without revealing her Identy and all 
ends happily. Bradley only discovering at the 
last minute* who was responsible for his re- 
tarn In good grace to the bosom of his family. 
The story Is one that might cause a lot of dis- 
cussion properly worked up In a publicity 
way. The role of the home wrecker, while 
not actually In accord with the general sym- 

£ tales of the audience at first, finally wins 
sm over at the finish of the picture. The 
feature Is worth while playing. Pre*. 

EASY~S?REET. 

In "Easy Street" Charlie Chaplin supplies 
the Mutual with the two reeler that is almost 
a month late in release, but, it Is said, from 
the fact that a lamp-poet fell and marred 
the nose of the comic, forcing him to "lay off" 
for two weeks. There Is a Tamp- post used in 
"Easy Street," and In the action it is bent 
and broken so that the alibi for the delay 
seems correct. Perhaps for the first time 
since he started with Mutual, Chaplin por- 
trays a policeman. He gets the job and is as- 
signed to "Easy Street, a narrow thorough- 
fare, which, from the daily routine, must be 
the place where ail the "rough-necks" are. 
trained. Leader of them Is Eric Campbell, 
whose burly bulk aptly lends Itself to Chap- 
lin's scenario. Before the new cop's advent 
Eric and his mob have cleaned up other po- 
licemen by the group. So when Charlie ap- 
pears with club and shield. It looks like pie 
to the chief mauler. Ox course, Charles 
manages to "tap" Eric on the head with his 
club but that makes no more impression than 
if be had hit him with a straw. To awe the 
new cop, Eric benda a lamp-post in half, 
but In that endeavor Charlie leaps on his 
back, shoves Eric's head through the lamp 
and turns on the gaa. Thus la the king of 
the roughs arrested. But he does not stay 
long in the station bouse,* simply breaking 
his handcuffs and starting In search of the 
new copper. The rough-house that results 
on that meeting Is pretty nearly "top class" 
with anything Charlie has yet effected. The 
resultant chaos and the several new stunts 
will be bound to bring the laughter and the 
star's display of agility and acrobatics ap- 
proaches some of the Doug Fairbanks' pranks. 
Chaplin has always been throwing things in 
his films, but when he "eases" a cook store 
out of the window onto the hesd of his ad- 
versary, on the street below, that pleaaant 
little bouquet adda a new act to his repertory. 
"Easy Btreet" certainly has some rough work 
In it — maybe a bit rougher than the others 
—but It Is the kind of stuff that Chaplin fans 
love. In fact, few who see "Easy Street" will 
fall to be furnished with hearty laughter. 

THE REDWOMAN. 

Maria Temosach Call Kane 

Morton Dean Mahlon Hamilton 

8anoho Ed. P. Roseman 

Dors Wendell June Elvidge 

Her mother Charlotte Earlcott 

There seems to be a growing demand for a 
revival of "cowboy stuff" in program pic- 
tures, Judging by the number of them that 
have been produced lately. The latest of these 
Is "The Red Woman," a World release, story 
by H. R. Dursnt, starring Call Kane. The 
daughter of an Indian chief earns high honors 
at an eastern college, but she is not received 
socially and returns to her people, where she 
resumes her native garb and goes back to her 
old life. She is courted by the head of a 
band of cattle thieves, but repels his advances. 
Morton Dean goes to New Mexico to work a 
mine owned by his wealthy, father. She. saves 
h!» !k'o, Uuy teU-irir-lo'v-y, -!><:• i'XiVos Utr (c-gi* 
back east to attend to Home business, a child 
is born, he returns and they are married. The 
western Btuff Is admirably depicted, with 
plenty of at tluii, hat Ihe w«-ak point of the 
story Is In the birth of the child prior to the 
marriage ceremony. Jolo. 



THE GIRL WHO DIDNT THINK. 

Lucille Ryan Jane (Jail 

Mr. Ryan Wm. Mandevllle 

Mrs. Ryan Agnes Nielsen 

James Lambert Stanley Walpole 

May Cumbers .May SImuu 

Irene Helen Mlllholland 

Her Pather Wm. Butler 

"The Oirl Who Didn't Think" Is the very at- 
tractive title of a well produced, conventional, 
melodramatic photoplay, the story • being of 
the brand of "The Fatal Wedding." A work- 
ins girl, despite the wsrning of her mother 
and after giving her mother a nromlse not to 
fall for the regulation Wall Street man-about- 



town betrayal, deliberately enters Into a liaison 
with a broker. She meet* him originally 
while delivering a gown to the man's mis- 
tress, so there can be no question as to his 
cnar^cter. Nevertheless she leaves her poor 
but honest parents for a gorf/aoua apartment 
provided by the broker, and when the woman 
he discarded for her cornea to plead to get her 
"man" back, the girl orders her out, glories 
that she Is to become a mother and hopes for 
marriage with hsr betrayer. When she finds 
he has tired of her, ahe goes sway with her 
faithful maid, her baby Is born, she reads the 
anouncement of the broker's wedding, goes to 
the church with ner Infant and during the 
ceremony steps forwsrd (ta-ra, to Indicate 
confrontation music) and flashes "Exhibit 



A." Oall Kane plays effectively the hero- 
ine, and the cast throughout, with the 
exception of the woman playing the 
girl's mother, were well seleetsd- This 
"mother" portrays the wife of a poor working 
rosn with t?»e aire of a.q%**n» always snugly 
corseted, bowing deferentially to her daugh- 
ter, dlgntfledly kisses her child on the brow, 
etc. Every old-fashioned melodrsmatlo bit of 
business has been resorted to, such as leaving 
the lamp burning in the window every night 
awaiting the daughter's return, eta This elx- 
reeler, with its mawkish title appeal, would be 
a rare Joke In a 25-oent picture palace, but In 
the jitney and dime program houses, should 
prove absorbingly Interesting and, what la 
more Important, a good drawing card. Jolo. 




"JOAN 
THE WOMAN" 

is a great motion picture. That is established by the 
unanimous praise it has evoked from scores of critics and 
thousands who have seen it. 

GERALDINE FARRAFk 

— greatest of all screen stars; — CECIL B. DeMILLE — genius 
of shadows; — and JOAN OF A.RC, the most remarkable 
woman of history — these are the contributing factors. 

Study the adjoining box office statement. 

It is the truthful and incontrovertible indication that the 
public is responsive to superlative merit. 

"JOAN THE WOMAN" 

is now being presented by JESSE L. LASKY twice daily to 
capacity audiences in two cities — at the 44th Street Theatre, 
New York, and the Majestic Theatre, Los Angeles. 

Cardinal Film Corporation 



485 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 




f nna - rtv i e. w s 



JIM BLUDSO. 

Jim Bludso.... Wilfred Lucas 

Qabrlelle Olga Grey 

Breena* .................. .....George Stone 

Tom Taggart. .. .. Charles Lee 

Kate' Winifred Westover 

Ben Merrill San De Grasse 

Banty Tim James O'Bhea 

Joe Bowers Monte Bine 

▲ tborong bly Interesting adaptation of John 

Hay's famous poem* of Pike County— fire 
reela by Triangle-Pine Arte, direction of Tod 

Browning and Wilfred Lucaa. The ■eenarlst 



has taken wide llbertlee with the original, 
but It probably .waa aeoessary to write a 
partly new story to introduce a lore interest. 
The screen rstalns the Mississippi River 
soenes and for a oilmen brings forward the 
episode of ths race, the fire and the heroism 
of the engineer who held- the boat's no*e 
against' the bank "Till the last galoot's 
ashore." The burning of the boat was a fine 
bit of film reallem. The other Incidents, 
taken from the poem itself and lntroduoed by 
the scenarist, make an absorbing story so that 
the film gripe attention at the outset and 
holds It to the final scene. Jim and his wife 
part because of the woman'a anger (she Is a 
southerner) when he Joins the Union army 
»t *he outbreak of the war. While Jim Is 



fighting, his wife elopes with a Mississippi 
River gambler, who later oasts her off. In 
battle, Jim's life Is oared by Banty Tim. and 
after the war ends Jim brlnge the negro home 
with him, and Tim becomes his assistant on 
the steamer "Prairie Belle.'* Jim learns of 
the gambler's desertion of bis wife and th*y 
hare a battle in the engine room 61 the boat, 
ending with Jim locking the gambler In a 
room, where, unknown to Jim, Little Breeohes 
haa hidden himself. Thus when ths boat 
takes fire, the twoy the gambler and Little 
Breeches, are trapped. This brings about a 
splendid bit of suspense. The part of Little 
Breeches Is a first rate example of clever 
"kid" work and adds a particularly good 
touch. 




BRIDGES BURNED. 

Mary O'Brien Mme. Petrova 

Ernest Randal Mahlon Hamilton 

O'Farrel Arthur Hoops 

Mary's ton Maury 9+euart 

Thomas O'Brien Robert Broderlck 

Nor-uii -". /. ,«^, Mtiifcilito BfUtida^a 

Solicitor Louis Stern 

Butler Thomas Cameron 

Popular Plays and Players (Metro) fea- 
ture, story by Olga Petrova, scenario by Wal- 
lace Clifton, directed by Perry Vekroff, pho- 
tography by Neil Bergman. Miss Petrova 
must have a poor personal opinion of her 
histrionic talents to think out so trivial a ' 
story for her individual screen service. Not 
only does It give her small opportunity for 
emotional acting, but she as the heroine lays 
herself open to criticism for having given her- 
self to a lover without the formality of a mar- 
riage ceremony ; the hero is a cad for having 
betrayed the heroine and then trying to welch, 
and the most sympathetic role Is that of the 
villain who tries to "rough-house" the 
heroine and finding her unwilling, becomes 
her protector and respects her loyalty to the 
man she really loves. One thing stands out 
very strongly and la entitled to especial com- 
mendation — the imparting of the betrayal to 
the audience by pantomime and without sub- 
titles.. It is a fine piece of picture direction. 
The production and casting are excellent 

Jola. 

THE AUSTRO-GERMAN FRONTS. 

The Elko Film Company has about 6,000 
feet of "war stuff" which Is in fairly good 
shape. The company claima this film is 
printed in the country from the negative, It 
being some of the only genuine negative that 
has arrived in this country, but the picture 
sharps who viewed. the private showing last 
week did not hesitate to say their belief waa 
that the film was "duped." But if It is, the 
work was done very well Indeed. The picture 
carries about 1,500 feet of Introduction show- 
ing the various dignitaries of the Austrian 
Government In Vienna, and then follows the 
operations of the army on the Italian front, 
and its operations in both Russia and Rou- 
manla. The picture has been particularly 
well assembled, but the material la not ex- 
traordinary, all of the action being centered 
In the last reel or so. The early sections 
being given over to armies on the march, 
camp life, captured towns, reviews of troops. 
the decorating of heroes, etc. The picture 
lacks In pen for general consumption, but in 
German and Austrian centers it will get over 
in great shape. There Is a lot of good ap- 
plause winning footage, where the general 
effect of the national airs of ths nations repre- 
sented will bring cheers. A trench scene 
late In the picture which looks a little 
"posey," Is sure to get over, and the liquid 
fire gun working in one of the late scenes 
are by far the best touches of the entire. 

Fred. 

SKINNER'S~DRESS SUIT. 

"Skinner's Dress Suit" Is a five reeler made 
by Bssanay with Bryan Washburn and Ruth 
Daly featured. The picture is based on the 
story of the same title by Henry Irving Dodge 
which appears In the Saturday Evening Post 
In picture form It Is highly amusing. The 
story revolves about a significant office slave 
who fee re his employer and does not rite f-om 
the ordinary employee level until his wife per- 
suades him to purchase a dreee suit and put 
on a good appearance which In the end helps 
him to succeed and become a member of the 
firm. For a five reel straight comedy the 
picture Is hugely Interesting. The principal 
people are well cast with Miss Daly, a capable 
female lead. The production is easily ons 
of the best turned Out by this concern In some 
time. 



VIRGINIA 
NORDfcN 



Expert Cameramen 



ISHED 



CINEMA 




ERA CLUB 
'» M. Y. C 



JOHN BRUNTON 
STUDIOS 

Productions of Every 
Description 

FOR PUBLIC PRIVATE, PROFESSIONAL 
AND NON-PROFESSIONAL 
PERFORMANCES 
SCENERY, PROPERTIES. STAGE FUR- 
NISHINGS FQR ALL OCCASIONS . 

226 WEST 41st STREET 
NEW YORK 

Telephone: Bryant 5914 



26 



"VARIETY 



..._ 











SAYS 

Theatres are packed 
to their utmost 
capacity. 

Audiences 

My ambitions are realized 

will never stop 
TRYING to please. 





My song hits and the 
biggest hits I have 
ever had were written 
by Edwin Weber. 



My Costumes were made 
by Catherine Arling- 
ton. 



"NEW YorR 

I m Ail Far You 



11 



VARIETY 



27 





Palace Theatre, New York 



EVA TANGUAY'S name in front of the Palace Theatre yesterday packed that house until the firemen 
stopped the box office from selling extra chairs in nooks and corners — New York Globe-Commercial Advertiser. 

The stormy welcome the Cyclonic comedienne received showed that she has made herself as much a New 
York Institution as are the WHITE LIGHTS, and the STATUE OF LIBERTY. 



EVA TANGUAY 

Theater— Palace. 

Style—Her own. 

Time— About thirty-five minute*. 

Settings-One. Special. 

Cyclonic Eva Tanquay, the wonder of vaudeville, where 
the bills change weekly and new facet are continually 
appearing to drive the memory of those of the week be* 
fore away, opened at the Palace Monday, before probably 
the moat skeptical athdience she ever faced. She had been 
out of the vaudeville game just long enough to create a 
doubt as to whether she really waa the great favorite it 
believed her to be. But just as soon as her admirers set 
eyes on her in the white ostrich creation in which she 
opened, and caught that bright smile, they knew they 
loved her in the same old way. 

Her first number, "How Do You Do, I'm Glad To Be 
Back," started things. She said ahe could change her 
dress in a couple of minutea and guaranteed the next 
would be a novelty. It was a blue satin hat, knickers 
and bodice trimmed with tiny flowers with a lattice work 
■hort hooped skirt worked out in the same flowers. In 
this, she sang "It's Funny What a New Suit of Clothes 
Will Do." She next appeared in an enormous hat and 
skirt all made of purple and sUver leaves and aang of 
Adam and Eve's courtship, comparing it with courtship 
a la mode. This got many laughs. She deplored the fact 
that she could not enlist a regiment of Tanguays to stop 
the war. 

In a beautiful pearl-trimmed cutaway with short pants 
a la Tanguay and tights; she showed no inclination to 
embonpoint. A silver cloth, draped in an odd manner 
from her head to her knees parted to ahow a silver body 
dress underneath. In this she did clever bits of clog 
dancing, Hawaiian suggestions and so forth, and said she 
would take a chance at any of the new dances if they 
would stand for her. 

Her last costume represented a large full blown rose, 
her body being the rose, her limbs the stem, and leaves 
extending up to her head. 

"Every Day Is Thanksgiving Day to Me," in which she 
tells the audience she owes all to them and if she don't 
keep their love and her position in the electric lights it's 
her own fault, went over with a bang. 

A song dedicated to "New York" and "I Don't Care" 
wer surg after which she recited many verses telling of 
her love and gratitude to the public. She announced for 
her final encore that she had just returned to vaudeville 
and that, within a month, she would have all new songs, 
etc. 



So long ss Evs Tanguay is sincere in her work she will 
be able te hold her audiences. She may be cyclonic, a 
bomb- shell or a live wire. But that's not the secret. It's 
something from the heart that reaches out and gets over 
the footlights. Here's to effervescent Eva. Like good 
wine, she improves with age. 

Eva Tanguay furnished so many thrills that those fur- 
nished by the Patria picture this week were mild and 
failed to awake any interest in even an expectant audience 
-New York Clipper. 

TANGUAY COMES BACK LIKE A BIG BASE DRUM. 

There is no denying that Eva Tanguay has learned the 
secret of how to maintain an average. It makes no dif- 
ference how often she diagrees with the vaudeville man* 
agers, no difference how long or frequent are her trips 
over the tank circuit, she always cemes back to a New 
York eager to welcome her. 

Miss Tanguay holds spotlight position on this week's 
Palace programme, and judged by her offering of yester- 
day she holds it through sheer ability to make people 
applaud everything she does* Here is a vaudeville player 
every time she returns to New York she comes back like 
a big base drum. She is one of the mysteries and the joys 
of the two-a-day.— T. E. O., "Evening MalL" 



EVA TANGUAY A GREAT HIT * ' 

By Sam M'Kee. 

Surely the top notch of brilliancy, importance and enter- 
tainment has been reached in the realm of vaudeville at 
B. F. Keith's Palace Theater this week. The public antici- 
pated this fact by attending yesterday's matinee in such a 
throng that it was necessary to avoid violating the fire 
laws by putting up the required tapes to surround the 
standees. 

With a speed that is part of her joyous vitality, Eva 
Tanguay burst upon the gaze of her startled admirers be- 
fore they had settled themselves for the preliminary music 
to her first song. This number told of her eagerness to be 
back on Broadway. The stormy welcome the cyclonic 
comedienne received showed that she hss made herself as 
much a New York institution as are the white lights and 
the Statue of Liberty.— New York Telegraph." 




Miss Eva Tanguay immediately drove the gloom from 
every nook of the large auditorium.— New York "Herald." 



'THE BILLBOARD" 

New York, Jan. 29.— Eva Tanguay headlined, and truly deserved the 
distinction, as she packed the house from cellar to roof, with many 
hundreds standing on all floors. The audience gave to the cyclonic 
Eva a reception that she will long remember. 

Hats off to Eva for her performance this afternoon— she put 
every ounce of pep into her work, snd the answer is that she stopped 
the show, even after the Castle picture was on view. The stage man- 
ager was compelled to raise the sheet to permit Miss Tanguay to 
respond to the thunderous applause. 

Eva danced most gracefully in one of her numbers, proving that 
there is no end to her entertaining qualifications. To be brief, she 
was a riot. Thirty-two minutes, in one; special drop; a dozen bows and 
a few speeches. 





Says 



4 

And I am the BIG Manager 

VAUDEVILLES WONDER 












28 



VARIETY 






• 










ANTS, ENGAGEMENTS 
SERVICE and INSTRUCTION 



SI for 25 words. 3 cents for each word over 



Energetic young man who understands mov- 
ing picture game. Great future for right per- 
son. Roehm & Richards, 216 Strand Blag., New 
York City. 

Juvenile straight, comedian and tenor singer. 
Will accept vaudeville or burlesque. Eddie Hart, 
3 87 Bleeker Street, New York City. 

Small trained dog. Will pay good price. 
Answer by mail only. Lenon, 1045 Coney Island 
Ave., Brooklyn. 

COMEDIANS, STRAIGHT MEN, PRIMA 
DONNAS. SOUBRETTES AND CHORUS GIRLS 
FOR NEXT SEASON. ROEHM & RICHARDS, 
STRAND THEATRE BLDG., NEW YORK CITY. 

BAN JOE WALLACE has taken larger 
quarters. Now located New York Theatre Build- 
ing, Suite 12. Leading Hotels and Cafes 
throughout the country booking Wallace's Or- 
chestras. 

Want suitable acta for carbarei and clubs. 
Can give 52 weeks booking. Sheridan Agency., 
Al Meyer, Manager, Gayety Theatre Building, 
1547 Broadway, Room 205. 

GOOD SOUBRETTES AND YOUNG PRIMA 
DONNAS IMMEDIATELY. ROEHM A 
RICHARDS, 216 STRAND BLDG., NEW YORK 
CITY. 

PORTER E. POTTS, Director of high class 
hotel and cabaret attractions. Artists apply. 
Suite 12, New York Theatre Building, N. Y. C 

Vaudeville Acta, sketches, monologues written 
for best acts now playing. Also write, criticize 
and rehearse acts. New Manuscripts now ready 
for approval. MISS RUTH HOUSTON, Gaiety 
Theatre Building, Room 315, New York City. 

Sea Ma before having your manuscript, 
sketches, parts typewritten. Reasonable rates. 
Best work guaranteed. Prompt delivery. Have 
typewritten manuscripts for leading theatrical 
managers. Room 315, Gaiety Theatre Building, 
Bryant -9437, New York City. 

Backer with $l,st* for a musical comedy road 
show. Great opportunity, aa have book, scenery 
and costumes. Apply Roehm & Richards, Strand 
Bldg . , New York City. 

A valour drop curtain. Must be 35 feet in 
width. Addiess Box 20, Variety, New York 
City. 

Booking first class acta for cabarets through- 
out the country. Billy Curtis (General Man- 
ager), Broadway Booking Office, New York 
Theatre Building, New York City. 



BILLY NEWKIRK producing Reviews and 
staging girl acts. Dancing scenes arranged for 
moving pictures. A review now in preparation 
will open at the Herald Square Hotel, Feb. 6. 
Room 1037, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
New York City. 

MINSTREL PERFORMERS, Quartette that 
can dance. Man for old darkey character and 
double on end. Must be Al, capable putting on 
dancing and harmony numbers. Write quick. 
C. Welch, Avon theatre, Rochester, N. V. 

Good looking young girl as partner in big 
time act, must sing and dance. Send photo 
and tell all first letter. Photo returned. B. L. 
Franklin, 281 Ash St., Brockton, Mass. 

HALLETT, 145 W. 45th, staging, writing, 
coaching all kinds of acts. Opening secured. 
Rehearsal studio, gj hours, $1. 

CLASSICAL DANCERS FOR A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE PRODUCTION. CALL IM- 
MEDIATELY. Con Conrad's Office, Rialto The- 
atre Building (42d St. and Bway.), New York 
City. { 

Trampoline performer for Billy Bouncer, in 
standard vaudeville act; steady position. Send 
photos. State lowest salary with full par- 
ticulars in first letter Pat Casey, Department 
"N," 1493 Broadway, New York City. 

Tha address of Charles Patterson? W. N. 
Dale, Room 403, 1493 Broadway, New York City. 

Girl dancer for out of town cabaret. Can use 
toe dancer immediately. J. B. Franklin, 1547 
Broadway, New York City. 

Stenographer and Typist. Salary, $10. State 
age and kind of experience. One experienced 
in booking office preferred. Box No. 7, VAR- 
IETY, New York. 

AT ONCE. A few more chorus girls for big 
musical comedy. Booked solid. Korach, 351 
Weat 48th Street, New York City. 

VOCAL INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN BY PROM- 
rNENT PROFESSOR OF MUSIC WILL TAKE 
A FEW ADVANCE PUPILS TO FINISH THE 
SEASON. HAVE PROTEGES NOW IN MU 
SICAL COMEDY, COMIC OPERA AND ORA- 
TORIO. PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS. MME. 
PAULA, 676 WEST END AVENUE, NEW 
YORK CITY. 

WILL BUY FOR CASH SMALL AND FULL 
SIZE CELLOS. ALaO OLD VIOLINS. WILL 
EXCHANGE. MERLE, care VARIETY. 

Piano and alnging lessons given at pupils' 
home or at atudio by appointment. Marie 
Jackson, 385 Ft. Washington Avenue, N. Y. C 



Cale AND EXCHANGE 






$1 for 25 words. 3 c«nts each word over 



1 



CHEAP. BLACK PLUSH FOUR- PIECE 
CYCLORAMA. APPLY ROEHM & RICH- 
ARDS, STRAND THEATRE BLDG., N. Y. C 

BIG SACRIFICE. Russian Ermine coat. 
Cost $2,500. Very reasonable. Antoinette, 
116 West 114th Street, New York City. 

Papier Macho Horso Hand Mask, bridle at- 
tached; lion head mask, large mane. Will fit 
«ood sized dog. Reasonable. Nansen, 349 
/est 120th Street, New York City. 

Brand New Roman Costume. High sandals 
(leather), and an exhibition Barbelle. Address, 
Jack Younger, 263 West 38th Street, N. Y. C. 

A Red Plush sot of tableaux curtains, 
trimmed with gold braid, 20 feet high, 24 feet 
wide. Can be seen by appointment. H. Wil- 
lianas, 142 West 44th Street, New York City. 

Animal and Bird Cages. Props for Birds, 
Dogs, Cats and Monkeys, have room in training 
quarters for Animal acts. Write or call Prof 
Pamahasika, 2322 and 2324 North Fairhill St., 
Philadelphia. Pa. 

RARE OPPORTUNITY. PARTY LEAVING 
CITY, WISHES SUBLET ENTIRE SUITE 
FURNISHED OFFICES; WONDERFUL LO- 
CATION, BROADWAY AND 42D STREET; 
OPPORTUNITY FOR PRODUCERS OR PIC- 
TURE CONCERNS; LARGE ROOMS FOR 
PRODUCING ACTS, SHOWS, FILM PROTEC- 
TIONS. ADDRESS, BOX 42, VARIETY, N. Y. 

For Sale. Model Aeroplane for novelty act 
in vaudeville. McDonald, 101 3d Ave., N. Y. C. 

PIANO FOR RENT. ALSO STUDIO PIANO, 
SUITABLE FOR REHEARSING ACTS: REA- 
SONABLE. ADDRESS, A. L., VARIETY, NEW 
YORK CITY. 

FOR SALE. A-LAKO v h OFFICE DKJ^K. 5E> 
SO OFFICE TABLE. MUST SELL AT SACRI- 
FICE. GOING OUT OF BUSINESS, BOX, 
123, VARIETY, NEW YORK CITY 

BEAUTIFUL OAK CABINET VICTROLA 
AND RECORDS. IN PERFECT CONDITION, 
LATEST MODEL. WILL SELL AT SACRI- 
FICE. FRANKLIN, care VARIETY, N. Y C. 



A FLAT-TOP. ALSO ROLL-TOP DESK FOR 
SALE, IN LIGHT OAK. PRACTICALLY NEW; 
PARTY LEAVING TOWN. 'PHONE, BRY- 
ANT 6690, NEW YORK CITY. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE. PHONO- 
GRAPH AND PHONOGRAPH RECORDS OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION. ALSO CASH REG- 
ISTER IN PERFECT CONDITION. LYNCH, 
care VARIETY, NEW YORK CITY. 

RETIRING FROM THE STAGE, WISH TO 
SELL COMPLETE SET OF VELVET DROPS; 
USEFUL PROPS; ALSO OTHER EFFECTS. 
BOX 903, VARIETY, NEW YORK CITY. 

ROYAL TYPEWRITER FOR SALE, AL- 
MOST NEW. BARGAIN FOR QUICK BUY- 
ER LYNCH, 530 W. 136TH ST., N. Y. C 

PRIVATE PARTY wishes to sell beautiful 
Packard car in excellent condition. Complete 
equipments. Will trade for cash and smaller 
car, in perfect condition. No dealers. An- 
swer mail only, Box 471, VARIETY, N. Y. C. 

PLUSH DROP, 27x55, IN GREEN. GOLD 
TRIMMED. FOR SALE AT A SACRIFICE. 
BOX 9 03, VA RIETY, NEW YORK CITY. 

UPRIGHT PIANO, BEAUTIFUL CONDI- 
TION; FINE TONE WILL SELL FOR J50 
CASH. BIG BARGAIN. BOX 437, VARIETY, 
NEW YORK CITY. 

FORD TOWN CAR, in first class running 
order. Must sell at a sacrifice on account of 
leaving city. Reasonable offer accepted. Ad- 
drcss Lowe, Girard Hotel, New York City. 

BIRDS, DOGS, CATS, MONKEYS, BEAd'Ti 
FUL AND WELL TRAINED STOCK, THE 
BEST THAT CAN BE OBTAINED FOR THE 
VAUDEVILLE STAGE WILL SELL OR 
LEASE, MAY CONSIDER EXCHANGE. CALL 
AND SEE THE BEST AT MY TRAINING 
QUARTERS. PROF. PAMAHASIKA, 2322 and 
2324 North Fairhill St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



BILLS NEXT WEEK. 

(Continued from page 13.) 
Bessie Lester Jessie Shirley Co 



Dinkins Barr A B 
I * B Smith 
Sett's Seals 
Raekctter, Mlaa. 

METRO (wva) 
Mile Paula 
Nima A Schuster 
Taa Weatherford 
Hoi man Bros 

2d half 
Jerre Sanford 
Two Blondle's 
(Two to fill) 
Rochester. N. Y. 

TEMPLE (ubo) 
Onrl ft Dolly 
B Welch's Minstrels 
Donovan A Lee 
Diamond ft Daughter 
Berate ft Baker 
Win Gaxton Co 
Nan Halperln 
Iahakla Japs 

FAMILY (sun) 
Darling 4 
Mabel Paige Co 
"Midnight Follies" 
Earl A Edwards 

2d half 
"Lovers Lake" 



Mr A Mrs Arthur Don 
(One to fill) 

Bait Lake 

ORPKEUM 

(Open Wed Night) 
(7-10) 
Nellie Nicholas 
Mr A Mrs J Barry 
Ollle Young A A 
Stan Stanley 3 
Al Shayne 
Flying Henrys 
Ronalr Ward A F 

PANTAGES (p) 
AskI Japs 
Wood Melville A P 
Howard ft Ross 
John T Doyle Co 
Joe Whitehead 
Hardeen 

Baa Dleejo 

PANTAGES (P) 

Nancy Fair 
"All Aboard" 
Olympla Desval 
Nouvelll Bros 
Moss A Frey 



MELSHEIMER'S 

Best Place te Eat fas St. Louis. 
mats aas Wsahlsttsa 
Hlfk Class Oaaart 



Rodney Ranous Co 
Carloa Caesaro 

Hock ford, HI. 

PALACE (wva) 
Ovonda Duo 
Oolding ft Keating 
"School Playgrounds" 
Hope Vernon 
Dudley 3 

2d half 
Heras A Preston 
Lane A Harper 
Princesa Ka Lama Co 
Darn Good A F 
Sig Franz Tr 

Sacramento 

ORPHEUM 

(5-6) 

(Same bill playing 

Stockton 7-8 and 

Fresno 9-10) 
Inez Macaulay Go 
Phyllis N Terry 
Willing A Jordan 
Valleclta's Leopards 
Milt Collins 
Mljarea 
Martin A Fsbrlnl 

Saginaw, Mich. 

JEFFERS-STRAND 

(ubo) 

(Sunday opening) 
(Flint split) 
lat half 
Carllta A Howland 
Work A Ower 
"Lawn Party" 
Bert Howard 
Robbie Gordone 
St. Louis. 
COLUMBIA (orph) 
Laura N Hall Co 
Kalmar A Brown 
Wms A Wolfus 
Chas Howard Co 
Wright A Dietrich 
Cantwell A Walker 
Pielot ft Scofleld 

EMPRESS (wva) 
Will Morrla 
Burton Hahn A M 
"Garden Aloha" 
Hays A Lohr 
S Loyal's Pets 
2d half 
Frear Baggot A F 
Gorman Bros 
Dunbars Singers 
Ray Snow 
Anker Bros 

GRAND (wva) 
Rae A Wynn 
Great Mars 
Ryan A Ryan 
Original Barretts 
Frances Dyer Co 
Mr A Mrs Mel Burne 
Bevan A Flint 
"Western Days" 
Chin Chin 

St. Paul 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Stone A Kalis 
Raymond A Caverly 
"Fishing" 
Bert Fitzglbbons 
Ethel Hopkins 
John Geiger 

PALACE (wva) 
Darto A Rialto 
Skelly A Hart 
Jas Thompson Co 
"Girl in Moon" 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Adroit Broa 
Niraz A Schuster 
"The Cheaters" 
(Two to fill) 
- HJ.PP <»br.> 

Davis ft Moore 
Mimic 4 
McNlel Mnye 
Howard Stlllman 
Flying Lordans 
' 2d half 

The Karuzos 
Evan A Newton 



Saa Fraaelaea 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Farber Girls 
Odlva 

Chllson Ohrmann 
Geo Nash Co 
Pilcer A Douglas 
Foster Ball Co 
Howard's 'Ponies 
Imhol Conn A C 
PANTAGES (p) 
(Sunday opening) 
Portia Sis 4 
Cook Girls 
"Suffragette Court" 
Chisholm A Breen 
Daniels A Conrad 



EMPIRE (wva) 

(6-7) 

(Same bill playing 

Reglna 8-10) 
Rom* A Wager 
Fremont Benton Co 
Ernest Dupllle 
Hayashl Japs 

Saraaaaa, Ga. 

(Jacksonville Spilt) 
1st half 
Mack A Williams 
Oscar Lorraine 
The Vernons 
Willing B A Willing 
Herr Jansen Co 

Seaeaeetadr, N. T. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
Chuck Haas 
Moore A Gerald 
Cartmell A Harris 
De Pace Opera Co 
Joe Cook 
Tiny May's Circus 

2d half 
The Peers 

Van Bergen A Gosler 
McCormack A Wallace 
Sam Llebert Co 
Bowman Bros 
Le Hoen A Dupreece 

Seraatoa, pa. 

POLI'S (Ubo) 
(Wilkes-Barre Split) 
1st half 
Fall A Fall 
Jones A Gray 
Plngree Wallace Co 
JAM Burke 
Jasper 

Seattle 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 

Morgan Dancers 

Ryan A Lee 

Benny A Woods 

Henry Keane Co 

Maurice Burkhart 

Samaroff A Sonia 

Zeda A Hoot 

PANTAGES (p) 

Elizabeth Cutty 

"Telephone Tangle" 

Bellclair Bros 

Nan Grey 

Aus Woodchoppera 

Bobble A Nelson 
Sioux City, la. 
ORPHEUM (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 

"Girl Worth While" 
2d half 

Kartelli 

Barber A Jackson 

Roth ft Roberto 

Ruskins Russians 

Palfry Hall ft B 

Sioux Palls, S. D. 

ORPHEUM (wva) 

^irJny si«t«.r*. 

UtiiiUp ft-Verdin. 
Adroit Bros 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Harry LaToy 
"Women" 
Bowen ft Bowen 
Martini ft Maxlmllllan 



South Bead, 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
/ (Sunday opening) 
Scamp ft Scamp 
Demarest ft Collette 
Middleton ft Spell- 

nieyer 
Neal Abel 
"Song ft Dance" 

2d halt 
Jura 

LeRoy ft Cahlll 
Franklyn Ardell Go 
"Win Gar Revue" 
(One to fill) 

Spokane 
PANTAGES (p) 

Dix ft Dixie 
Grace Edmonds 
Mystic Bird 
Frank Fogarty 
Berio Girls 
Mack ft Velmar 

Springfield, ILL 

Majestic (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Bollinger ft Reynolds 
Miller Sisters 
Win Armstrong Co 
Freeman Dunham Co 
Great Lesters 
"The Elopers' 
2d half 
Hale Bros 
Grace Hanson 
Weston ft Claire 
Jimmy Lucas Co 
"Anderson Revue" 
McConnell ft Simpson 

Springfield, Mass. 
PALACE (Ubo) 
Sheets ft Eldird 
Bob Quigley Co 
Nardlnl , 

Ed Blondell Co 
Cox ft Joyce 
Evans ft Sister 

2d half 
Leddy ft Leddy 
Gruet Kramer ft O 
Morgan ft Armstrong 
C Dean Players 
Stone ft Hayes 
C Santo Melange 

PLAZA (loew) 
Musical Droll 
Hall A Worth 
Dorothy Burton Co 
Hamilton 
Fisher ft Saul 

2nd half 
Wells DeVeaux 
Fox ft Young 
Grey ft Klunker 
Sutton Mclutry ft S 
(One to fill) 



Springfield, O. 

FAIRBANKS (sun) 
The Doughertys 
Downes Williams Co 
Claudia Coleman 
"Maids of Killarney' 

2d half 
"Jr Follies" 



Stamford, Cei 

ALHAMBRA (ubo) 
2d half (1-4) 
Jack Alfred Co 
Davis ft Walker 
Johnson ft Crane 
Mysterious Will 
3 Jeanetta 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

TEMPLE (ubo) 
The Peers 

Van Bergen ft Gosler 
MCCormack ft Wallace 
Sam Llebert Co 
Harry B Lester 
Le Hoen ft Dupreece 

2d' half 
Chuck Haas 
Fin ft Fin 
Cartmell ft Harris 
De Pace Opera Co 
Bell ft Freda 
Long Tack Sam Co 
CRESCENT (ubo) 
Wilton ft Marshall 
fid Grey 
Aerial Bartletts 
G Mllington Co 
Carnival Girls 
2d half 
Flsk ft Fallon 
Davenport ft Rafferty 
Llda McMillan Co 
Palfrey Hall ft B 
(One to fill) 

Taeoma 

SPOKANE (p) 
Kinkaid Kiltlea 
Travltt's Dogs 
Jones ft Johnson 
Great Leon 
Margaret Ford 
Bckboff ft Gordon 

Terre Haute, lad. 

HIP (wva) 

(Evansville split) 

1st half 

"Suffragette Revue" 

Toledo* O. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Daisy Jean 
The Sharrock's 
''Slam* AhfHd" 
The Stampede 
Hcnsee ft Balrd 
Page Hack A M 

Toronto. 

SHEA'S (ubo) 
White ft Cavanaugh 



Mrs Gene Hughes Co 
iiert Melrose 
Mae Curtis 
Be Ho Gray Co 
Musical Johnsons 
The Demacoa 

HIP (ubo) 
Francis ft Ross 
Eddie Heron Co 
Temple 4 
Roy Bryant Co 
Berrlck ft Hart 
Toots Paka 

YONGE (loew) 
Greno ft Piatt 
Frank Gaby Co 
Harry Sydell 
"Day at Ocean Beach" 
Hawthorne ft Lester 
(Two to fill) 

Trenton, N. J. 

TAYLOR O H (ubo) 

2d half (1-4) 
George Wlckman 
Lynne ft Francla 
Brooka ft Taylor 
Ed Farrell Co 
Fox ft Ingraham 
Lillian's Dogs 

Troy. N. Y. 

PROCioH'tt l ubo) 
"Yankee" ft "Dixie" 
Jessie Standiah 
Warren ft Conley 
Frank Mayne Co 
Bowman Bros 
Long Tack Sam Co 

2d half 
Moore ft Gerald 
The Yaltoa 
Dahl A Glllen 
Harry Fern Co 
Harry B Lester 
Tiny May's Circus 

Vancouver. B. C. 
ORPHEUM 
Dorothy Jardon 
Tempest A Sunshine 
Corbett Shepp A D 
Hallen A Fuller 
Flanagan A Edwards 
Maria Lorraine 
Witt A Winter 

PANTAOES (P) 
Pauline 

Evelyn A Dolly 
Hugo Koch Co 
Marie Ruasell 
Goldsmith A Plnard 

Victoria, B. C. 

PANTAGES (P) 
Chinese Duo 
Anthony A Mack 
Mr Chaser 
SAL Burns 
Bob Fits A Bob, Jr 

Virginia, Minn. 

2d half only 
Senate Duo 
"What Hap Ruth" 
Three Willie Bros 
The Reynolds 
Washington, D. C. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Nat Goodwin 
Jas B Caraon Co 
Dolly Connelly Co 
Milo 

A Sullivan Co 
Helens Davis 
"Garden of Surprises" 
"Patria" (film) 
Waterbury, Conn. 

POLI'S (ubo) 
Leddy ft Leddy 
Billy Rogers 
Durkin Girls 
C Dean Players 
Burna A Klsaen 
Musical Misses 
2d half 
Sheets A Eldert 
Bob Quigley Co 
Ernie A Ernie 
Cox A Coyne 
"Han Hunters" 

Waterloo, la. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
"He's In Again" 

2d half 
Archie Nicholson 3 
Pedrini A Monks 
Cathryn Chaloner 
BAH Gordon 
Lona's Hawalians 



WestftelsL Mass. 

GRAND (loew) 
Wills DeVeaux 
Grey A Klunker 
Sutton Mclntyre A 8 

2fTd half 
Hall A Worth 
Hamilton 8 
Fisher A Saul 

Wkeellsg, W. Va. 

VICTORIA (sun) 
Orvllle Stamm 
MAD Sollmlne 
"Between Trains" 
Chip Donaldson 
Miss America 

2d half 
Chiyo A Chlyo 
Burt Johnson Co 
Baron Llchter 
Royal 4 
(One to fill) 

Wilkes Bctrre, Fa\ 

POLI'S (ubo) 
(Scranton split) 
1st half- 
Raymond Wilbert 
Burns A Foran 
Mudge Morton 3 



Montgomery ft Perry Fred J Ardath Co 



. 



VARIETY 



29 



Frankle Heath 
Keddington 4 Grant 
Wllllaauiport. Pa. 
MAJESTIC (ubo) 
Oarclnettl Broa 
Skipper 4 Kastrup 
"Dream of Orient" 
Doe O Neill 
Yellow Peril 

2d halt 
Frank Terry 
Gordon Bldrid Co 
Leonard 4 Wlllard 
Mosher Hayes 4 M 

WlBBlpCK 

ORPHEUM 
Lew Dockstader 
Scotch Laaaiea 
Geo Kelly Co 
Caites Bros 
NaUlle Alt 
Moore Gardner & R 
Everest's Monks 

STRAND (wva) 
Rambler Slaters 
The Tsmer 
Pitch Cooper 
B Bouncer's Cir 

PANTAOE8 (p) 
Military Elephants 
Francis Renault 
John P Wade Co 
Wells Northworth 4 M 
"Smart Shop- 
Woonaocket, R. I. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
Blanche Sloan 
Ellnore 4 Carlton 
Melody 6 

2d half 
Xylo Maids 
Zeno 4 Mandell 
Chas Rogers Co 

Worcester. 

POLI'8 (ubo) 
Roeder 4 Dean 
El Coto 

Jack Kennedy Co 
Stone 4 Hayes 
"Cabaret Girl" 



2d half 
Casettl 4 Rydell 
Haeger 4 Goodwin 
Green Miller 4 G 
Clifford 4 Wilis 
Evans 4 Bister 

PLAZA (ubo) 
Rakom* 

Guertln 4 Gibson 
James Teed Co 
Gruet Kramer 4 O 
C Santo Melange 

2d half 
3 Jeanettes 

J 4 A Francis 

"Immigrant" 

Sinclalre 4 Gasper 

Local 

Yonkfra, If . T. 
PROCTOR'S (ubo) 

Darus Bros 

Berlin Sisters 

Jewell's Manikins 

Win Morris Co 

Morris 4 Allen 

Mercedes 

2d half 

The Agimos 

"Jackie" 4 "Bllll<» 

Richards 4 Kyle 

E Corrlgan Co 

Chas Kenna 

Mercedes 

York. Pa. 

O H (ubo) 
1st half (5-7) 
Harry Ward 
Macart 4 Bradford 
Amer Comedy 4 
Maids of Music 
Younaatown. O* 
HIP (ubo) 
Chas B Brans Co 
Edna Aug 
Arthur Deagon 
Ruby Cavelll Co 
F 4 L Bruch 
Phlna 4 Picks 
Leach Wallin 3 
Merian's Dogs 



OBITUARY. 

George P. Holland, at one time one 
of the T>ett known circus men in the 
country — the father of George Holland 
(Holland-Dockerill Co.), died Jan. 28 
at the Holland home in Biloxi, Miss. 
He was in the sixties. 

William S. (Willie) Pearson, brother 
of Arthur and Roger Pearson (treas- 
urer of the Chicago theater, Chicago), 
died recently of pneumonia in that city. 
He was ill but two days. 

The father of Kerry Meagher of the 
Western Vaudeville, Managers' Asso- 
ciation, died recently at the Meagher 
home in Chicago. 

The mother of Grade Emmett died 

{an. 21 at the age of 75. at Somerville, 
fass. Miss Emmet will rejoin her 
show in Detroit next week. 

The mother of William Grady, the 
vaudeville agent, died of pneumonia, 
Jan. 27, at her home in Lynn, Mass., at 
the age of 47. 

William Worden, assistant property 
man at the Hippodrome, New York, 
died Jan. 17 leaving a widow. 

Mike Margoliea, electrician at the 
Irving Place for several seasons, died 
Jan. 21. A widow and child survive. 

The father of A. Tos. Jordan, orches- 
tra leader at the Fulton, Brooklyn, died 
suddenly Jan. 2. 

J. Edgar Littleton, a baritone, of 
Lynn, Mass., died Jan. 24 at his sister's 
home i R Worcester. 

The mother of Mary Dorr died in 



ry 

St. Paul late last week, 
years old. 



She was 49 



Lew Hoffman, brother of Aaron 
Hoffman, died of pneumonia in Chicago 
Jan. 30, after an illness of but one day. 

The father of William Rankin, pro- 
ducer-actor, died two weeks ago in 
Liverpool, England. 

The mother of Elmer F. Rogers died 
Jan. 28 in her home in Philadelphia. 

Five-Reel Essanav- Washburn. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 
Everything , is in readiness for the 
first release of the new Essanay fea- 
ture, "Skinner's Dress Suit/' with 
Bryant Washburn featured. 



CHAUTARD WITH GOLDWYN. 

Emile Chautard, the French director, 
leaves the Peerless studios and will join 
the staff of the Goldwyn Co. ye was 
receiving $300 a week from Peerless 
and it is understood his weekly wage 
under his new contract is to be $700. 

Mr. Chautard's son-in-law, Archam- 
bault, who has been his assistant, is to 
be promoted to a directorship post with 
Peerless at a salary of $250. 



ART CRAFT AND FAIRBANKS. 

According to report early this week 
Douglas Fairbanks was about to enter 
into an agreement with the Art Craft 
for $15,000 weekly. 

( Fairbanks named $15,000 as his posi- 
tive and final figure, it is said, to give 
him an amount in excess of $10,000 
weekly would ensure agajjist any judg- 
ment Triangle might obtain against 
him, if suit were to be brought against 
Fairbanks for breach of contract. 

The situation of Fairbanks and his 
contract with Triangle is similar in 
aspect to that of Chaplin's, at the time 
he engaged with Mutual, when Essanay 
claimed an agreement with him and 
afterward sued Chaplin for $500,000 
damages. 



NAT WILLS IN COMICS. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 
Nat Wills here with "Hip, Hip, Hoo- 
ray" is planning an entry in the comedy 
film field, having received an offer from 
William Fox. An agreement may be 
reached this week. - Wills promises 
something entirely new. 



J„ L & S. GET JOAN. 

Chicago, Jan. 31. 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer have pur- 
cased from the Cardinal Film Cdrp the 
rights for Illinois and Indiana to 4 \Joan 
the Woman," paying $150,000 for same. 
They will put it into the Colonial, this 
city, following "Intolerance," for an 
indefinite run. 

They have also secured from the Sig- 
net Film Co. the rights to "The Masque 
of Life" for Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky 
and Michigan. 



JOSEPH HAZLETOfc HURT. 

Los Angeles, Jan. 31. 
Joseph Hazleton, one of the pioneers 
of the films, was run down and per- 
haps fatally hurt by an automobile. 
He was rushed to the County Hospital 
and it is not known whether he will 
recover. 



CALIFORNIA CO. DIVIDEND. 

The California Motion Picture Co. 
has paid its creditors a dividend of five 
per cent, on its outstanding claims, with 
no definite information regarding the 
further liquidation of its indebtedness. 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



Feb. and F«b. 12. 

"A New York Girl" 5 Colonial Providence R I 

12 Gayety Boston. 
"Americans" 4-6 Lyceum Duluth 12 Century 

Kansas City Mo. 
"Auto Girls" 5 Mt Carmel 6 Shenandoah 7-10 

Majestlo Wllkes-Barre 12 So Bethlehem 13 

Baston 14 Pottstown Pa 15-17 Grand Tren- 
ton N J. 
"Beauty Youth 4 Folly" 5 Howard Boston 12- 

14 Orpheum New Bedford 15-17 Worcester 

Worcester Mass. 
"Behman Show" 5 Gayety Kansas City 12 Oay- 

ety St Louis Mo. 
"Bon Tons" 5 Columbia New York 12 Casino 

Brooklyn. 
"Bostonlans" 5 Empire Brooklyn 15-17 Park 

Bridgeport Conn. 
"Bowery Burlesquers" 5 Empire Toledo 12 

Lyceum Dayton O. 
"Broadway Belles" 5 Star Toronto 12 Savoy 

Hamilton Ont. 
"Burlesque Revue" 5 Lyceum Dayton 12 Olym- 
pic Cincinnati O. 
"Cabaret. Girls" fcO AmsteitfaiQ. Ara«*«n^m J.- . 

30 Hudson Schenectady 12-13 Elugbamtoii 

14 Oneida 15-17 Inter Niagara Falls N Y. 
"Charming Widows" 5 8tar Brooklyn 12-13 

Holyoke Holyoke 14-17 Gllmore Springfield 

Mass. 
"Cherry Blossoms" 5 Gayety Brooklyn 12 

Academy Jersey City. 
"Darlings of Paris" 5 Majestic Ft Wayne Ind 

12 Buckingham Louisville Ky. 



"Follies of Day" 5 Orpheum Peterson 12 Bm- 

pire Hoboken N J. 
"Frolics of 1917" 5 Buckingham Louisville 12 

Lyceum Columbus O. 
"French Frolics" 5-6 Blnghainton 7 Oneida 
8-10 Inter Niagara Fulls N T 12 Star To- 
ronto. 
''Follies of Pleasure" 5-7 Orpheum New Bed- 
ford 8-10 Worcester Worcester Mass 12-13 
Amsterdam Amsterdam 14-17 Hudson Sche- 
nectady N Y. 
"Ginger Girls" 5 Trocadero Philadelphia 12 

Olympic New York. 
"Girls from Follies" 5 Standard St Louis 11- 

13 H Terre Haute Ind. 
"Girls from Joyland" 5 Star St Paul 11-13 

Lyceum Duluth Minn. 
"Globe Trotters" 5 Gayety St Louis 12 Star A 

Garter Chicago. 
"Golden Crook" 5 Empire Newark 12 Casino 

Philadelphia. 
"Grown Up Babies" 5 Newark 6 Zanesvllle 7 
Canton 8-10 Akron 12 Empire Cleveland O. 
"Hastlng's Big Show" 5 People's Philadelphia 

12 Palace Baltimore Md. 
"Hello Girls" 5-6 Holyoke Holyoke 7-10 Gll- 
more Springfield 12 Howard Boston Mass. 
"Hello New York" 5 Gayety Toronto 12 Gayety 

Buffalo N Y. 
"Hello Paris" 5 New Castle 6 Johnstown 7 
Altoona 8 Harrisburg 9 York 10 Reading Pa 
12 Gayety Baltimore Md. 
"High Life Girls" 5 Academy Jersey City 12 

Gayety Philadelphia. 
"Hip Hip Hooray Girls" 8-10 Park Bridgeport 

12 Colonial Providence R I. 
"Howe's Sam Show" 5-7 Cohen's Newburgh 
8-10 Cohen's Poughkeepsle 12 New Hurtlg A 
Semons New York. 
"Irwin's Big Show" 5 Gayety Pittsburgh 12 

Star Cleveland O. 
"Lady Buccaneers" 5 Gayety Baltimore Md 12 

Trocadero Philadelphia. 
"Liberty Girls" 5 Casino Philadelphia 12 

Miner's Bronx New York. 
"Lid Lifters" 5 Lyceum Columbus 12 Newark 

18 Zanesvllle 14 Canton 15-17 Akron O. 
"Majesties" 5 Gayety Washington D C 12 Gay- 
ety Pittsburgh. 
"Maids of America" 5 Berchel Dee Moines la 

12 Gayety Omaha Neb. 
"Marlon Dave Show" 5 Grand Hartford 12 

Jacques Waterbury Conn. 
"Merry Rounders" 5 L O 12 Gayety Kansas 

City Mo. 
"Midnight Maidens" 5-7 Bastable Syracuse 8- 
10 Lumberg Utlca N Y 12 Gayety Montreal. 
Military Maids" 5-6 Erie 7 Ashtabula 8-10 
Park Youngstown O 12 New Castle 13 
Johnstown 14 Altoona 15 Harrisburg 16 
York 17 Reading Pa. 
"Million Dollar Dolls" 5 Columbia Chicago 12 

Gayety Detroit Mich. 
"Mischief Makers" 5 Cadillac Detroit 12 L O. 
"Monte Carlo Girls" 5 Savoy Hamilton Ont 12 

Cadillac Detroit 
"Pace Makers" 5 So Bethlehem 6 Easton 7 
Pottstown Pa 8-10 Grand Trenton N J 12 
Star Brooklyn. 
"Parisian Flirts" 5 Majestlo Scranton 12 Gay- 
ety Brooklyn. 
"Puss Puss" 5 Empire Albany 12 Casino Bol- 
ton. 
"Record Breakers" 5 Gayety Milwaukee 12 

Gayety Minneapolis. 
"Reves Al" 5 Corinthian Rochester 12-14 Bas- 
table Syracuse 15-17 Lumberg Utlca N Y. 
"Review of 1917" 5 Gayety Philadelphia 12 
Mt Carmel 13 Shenandoah 14 Majestic 
Wllkes-Barre Pa. 
"Roselan^ Girls" 5 Empire Hoboken 12 Peo- 
ple's Philadelphia. 
"Sept Morning Glories" 5 Century Kansas 

City 12 Strand St Louis Mo. 
"Sidman Sam Show" 5 Gayety Buffalo 12 

Corinthian Rochester N Y. 
"Sightseers" 5 Gayety Montreal 12 Empire Al- 
bany. 
"Social Follies" 5 Englewood Chicago 12 Gay- 
ety Milwaukee. 
"Some Show" 5 Jacques Waterbury Conn 12- 
14 Cohen's Newburgh 15-17 Cohen's Pough- 
kecpslo N Y. 
"Spelgel Review" 5 Star A Garter Chicago 12 

Berchel Des Moines la. 
"Sporting Widows" 5 Star Cleveland 12 Em- 
pire Toledo O. 
"Star A Garter" 5 Miner's Bronx New York 12 

Orpheum Paterson N J. 
"Step Lively Girls" 5 Casino Boston 12 Grand 

Hartford Conn. 
"Stone A Plllard" 6 Gayety Omaha Neb 12 

L O. 
"Sydell Rose" 5 Casino Brooklyn 12 Empire 
Newftrk N / 

"Tango Queens" 6 Gayety Minneapolis 12 Star 

St Paul Minn. 
"Tempters" 5 Gayety Chicago 12 Majestlo Ft 

Wayne Ind. 
'Thoroughbreds" 5 L O 12 Buglewood Chicago. 
"Tourists" 5 Olympic New York 12 Majestic 

Scranton Pa. 
"20th Century Maids" 5 Gayety Detroit 12 

Gayety Toronto. 
"U S Beauties" 4-6 O H Terre Haute Ind 12 

Gayety Chicago. 
"Watson Billy" 5 New Hurtlg A Semons New 

York 12 Empire Brooklyn. 
"Watson Wrothe" 5 Olympic Cincinnati 12 

Columbia Chicago. 
"Welch Ben" 5 Gayety Boston 12 Columbia 

New York. 
"White Pat" 5 Empire Cleveland 12-18 Erie 14 

Ashtabula 15-17 Park Youngstown O. 
"Williams Mollie" 5 Palace Baltimore Md 12 
Gayety Washington D C. 



INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

Next Week, Feb. 5. 

-"Bringing t T p Fatter'' Gayety Louisville Kj. 
' Broadway After uark* MtfjeKtic Buftafo N Y. 
"Busy Iszy" Prospect Cleveland O. 
"Come Back to Erin" Lyceum Pittsburgh. 
"Emmett Orsce" National Chicago. 
"Hans A Fritz" Poll's Washington D C. 
"Her Unborn Child" Garden Kansas City Mo. 
"Hill's Gus Follies" Boyd's Omaha Neb. 
"In Old Kentucky" American St Louis Mo. 
"Jerry" Castle Sq Boston. 



"Little Girl In Big City" Orpheum Philadelphia. 
"Little Women" Grand Worcestsr Mass. 
"Millionaire's Son and Shop Girl" Lexington 

New York. 
"Mutt A Jeff's Wedding" Gotham Brooklyn. 
"My Aunt From Utah" Majestic Jersey City. 
"Old Homestead" Bronk New York. 
"Peg iT My Heart*' Jmperta; Chicago. 
"Pretty Baby" Auditorium. Baltimore. 
"81s Hopkins" Bijou Richmond. 
"That Other Woman" Park Indianapolis. 
"Thurston" Walnut Philadelphia, 
'When a Girl Loves" Bijou Birmingham Ala. 
"Which One Shall I Marry" Lyceum Pater- 
son N J. 



LETTERS 

Where C follows name, lettes is in 
Variety's Chicago office. 

Where S F follows name, letter is in 
Variety's San Francisco office. 

Advertising or circular letters will 
not be listed. 

P following name indicates postal, 
advertised once only. 

Reg following name indicates regis- 
tered mail. 



Adams Mabelle 
Adams Minerva 
Adams Mrs Ray 
Adler Chas J 
A'Hearn Dan 
Alcarona 5 (8F) 
Aldrldge Georgle 
Allen Searle (C) 
Allen Miss Tommy 
Allyn R V 
Alvln Mr A Mrs M 
Anderson Arthur 
Anderson Al (C) 
Andrews Q B 
Andrus Cecil 
Appleby B J 
Argentina La 
Armanda Miss (8F) 
Armena (C) 
Arnold Jack (C) 
Artols Jack 
Artols Mrs Waltei 
Aubrey Jack (C) 
Austin Mrs Fred 
Avery Drew 

B 
Baggett Jim 

Baker Mildred 
Bancroft Ruth 
Barnes Eugene 
Barton Frsnk 
Bauvard Fred 
Baxley Jack 
Baxter Ed (C) 
Beggs Lee 
Benedict P F 
Bennett John 
Bernhelm Jules 
Berry A WUhemlnl . 
BUford Mrs A 
Bird Dorothy V 
Birth Day Party 
Blondell Llbby A 
Bob Tip Co 
Bonlnger A Lester 
Booth Hope 
Bradley Kate- Mae 
Brandt Roy Co 
Brlerry M B CO 
Broad Billy 
Brohm Kathryn (C) 
Brooks Miss K 
Brooks Wally (C) 
Brbwn Tom (C) 
Browne Mrs Geo F 
Browning Joe 
Burton Richard 
Burtwick Ruth 
Butterworth Porter A 

B 
Byron Hellen 



Calles Larry C 
Cameron Grace 
Camllle Trio 
Campbell Al (P) 
Campbell Dewey 
Campbell Mrs Ethel L 
Campbell Inez 
Caress Bill 
Carew Mabel 
Carr Minnie 
Casetta Carlo 
Challlss A Lambert 
Chester C F (8F) 
Chisholm Mrs Chrs 
Clnnlottl Mrs Paul 
Clare Alice H (C) 
Clark Edward 
Coen Verne 
Cohen Manny 
Coleman Tim 
Collins Eddie 
Condray Peggy 
Conway Chas E 
Cook A Oatman (C) 
Cookley Hubert 
Corcoran Jack 
Costell Margaret 
Crelghton J (C) 



Dale Fred (C) 
D*lton Tcm <-C) 
Daiy I/bh 

Dareval James (C) 
Davidson John 
Davis Jack 
Davis J 
Davis Marlon K 
Davis Warren (C) 
De FUlce Charlotte 
De Grant Oliver 



De Groff Miss F (C) 
De Laine Muriel K 
De Lisle A Vernon (P) 
Del Jack (P) 
Del man Katharine 
De Marr Rose 
De May Hilda 
Denton Mrs H 
Deltrich Roy (C) 
Delores Laura (C) 
De Nyl Doo (C) 
De Onsonne Nellye 
De Paoe Opera Co 
De Rosas Cats (O) 
De Schon Cuba (C) 
Dillon Tom 
Dorrell Gladys (C) • 
Douglas J G 
Dual Clara (C) 
Du Bols Wilfred (C) 
Duffy Margaret 8 
Dunedin J 
Dunn Arthur 
Duryea Walter ■ 

B 
Earle Ralph 
Barl Maud 
Ebs Mrs L A 
Eddie A Bdgar (C) 
Edgar Wm (C) 
Edwards Ray 
Bllason Frank 
Bills W 8 (P) 
Bison Arthur 
Bmmett Mrs J (C) 
Brlokson Our A 
Bspe Al 
Bss Alice . 

Eugene A Burley (C) 
Evans Bdwln 
Bwald Edward 

_, (Htm 

F 
Falrweather Una 
Falrman A Furman 

(C) 
Fearns Boh 
Ferrlere P F (P) 
Fields A Minor 
Fields Harry 
Flscbbean Rosle 
Fitsgerald H V (C) 
Fleeson Neville 
Fletcher Jtmmle 
Florence Daisy 
Florence Winifred 
Forbes Marlon 
Force Fred 
Ford Capt B C 
Ford Ethel 
Forkins Marty (8F) 
Foster Genevieve 
Fraebel Bmma 
Francis Bmma 
Frankleno Mrs K (C) 
Franklin Irene 
Fraser Bunce A Hardy 
Fredericks Anna (C) 
Freitag Eddie (C) 

G 

Gaby Frank 
Gallon Mrs J (8F) 
Gardener Frank 
Gates B 
Gates Ruth 
Gerould Helen 
Gibbons Bdythe 
Gllson Hardy (C) 
Glenmorr Lottie 
Oobrecht W T 
Ooldle Billy 
Gordon Rosle 
Grandy Gertie (C) 
Gray Trio 

Green Harrison (C) 
Grew William A 
Grew Wm A (C) 
Grey Betty 
Grey Marie (8F) 
Grey Marie (C) 
Griffin Gerald (SF) 
Grogan Clarence (C) 
Grogan Mrs C (C) 
Grover F R (C) 
Oulllon M 
Gulllon Mile (C) 
Guy Brothers 



Hadley A Oakland 
Hager Clyde 
Hake Harry (C) 
Halbach Winifred 
Hall A Wright 
Hall Howard R 



30 



VARIETY 



- 



3C 



\A/A 



ER DONALDSON 



who is responsible for the melodies of those song hits "We'll Have a Jubilee in Nfly Old Kentucky Home," "Just Try to Picture 

Me Back Home in Tennessee" and "Come on to Nashville," recently signed a contract to write exclusively for our firm 

and the "first crack out of the box" has handed us a song that is simply going to pul itself over — its title 



l *Z5 THE SWEETEST GIRL 



MARYLAND 



tells the story and is another one of those delightful "Southern ditties" that helped to make his name a household word 

among lovers of this style of music. It was originally introduced by PERCY BRONSON and WINNIE BALDWIN , 

in Oliver Morosco's production "SO LONG LETTY," and has never failed to take from three $o five encores 

at every performance. In addition to the song there are double versions of all kinds, a female version, 

also a wonderful patter, all published with the song in the professional copy. 



ALL YOURS FOR THE ASKING 



ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Pan tages Building 

AL. BROWNE, Mgr. 



CHICAGO 

Schiller Bundi.iy 

TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 



M. Witmark & Sons Philadelphia 

Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Mgr. * ' 02 J, ™*«™ % " 



BOSTON 

Tremont St. 



2 BROADWAY, NEXT TO PALACE THEATRE 



ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr, 



Hall Leona (C) 
Hall LeRoy 
Halllnteck Wyatt (C) 
Hamlin Richard 
Harding K 
Harrlngtori Hazel 
Harris Geo 
Harris Reba D 
Harris Mr Val 
Harvest Days 
Hawkins Georgia 
Hayes Walter J 
Hayes A Wayne (C) 
Heather Mary 
Held Jules 
Hepner Harry 
Herbert Clinton 
Herman Arthur (SF) 
Hicks Joe (C) 
Higglns R 
Hillman Chas B 
Hills Mollle 
HInkle Geo 
Hoey Geo (C) 
Hollands Josephine 
Hooper Phyllis 
Houghton Frank (C) 
Howard A White 
Howard Miss Glenny 
Howe Adele (P) 
Huling Frank B 



Hume Harry (C) 
Hunt Patsy Miss 

Ingalls A Duffleld (C) 



Jeanette W 
Jenks 81 
Jerome Mrs 
Johnson Ally 
Jones A Gray 
Jordan Polly 
Josephs M B (SF) 
Jourdon Randall (C) 



Kammerer A Howland 

(P) 
Kane Lem f C) 
Kannie David 
Kaplon J 
Karlton Avery 
Kay Anna 
Keane P (C) 
Keane Robert E 
Keating Charlie 
Keith Cato 
Kelgard W P 
Keillors Les 
Kelly Mrs J Spencer 

(P) 



Kelly W A 

Kelso A Leighton (C) 
Kennedy Harold 
King A Millard 
Kirk Ethel 
Kissen Murray 
Kitchener Mis M 
Klein Phillip 
Kleinberg H H (C) 
Knapp ft Murray 
Knight Bertha (C) 
Kohler Mannle 
Kotha Gerdes (SF) 
Kramer Al 

+ L 

La France France 
La Mara Flying 
Lamb Frank (C) 
Lamb W A 
La Mar Irene 
La Pine Lyle 
La Pollita Miss (P) 
La Port Joe 
La Rado Viola 
La Rue Lillian 
La Venere La 
Le Clair Maggie 
Lehman Mrs O 
Leighton Bert (C) 
Leighton Burt (P) 



Leighton Chas (SF) 
Lennox Nat 
Leonard! 

Leonard Albert (C) 
Leon Sisters 
Le Roy Robert 
Leslie Geo W 
Lester Doris 
Lester Harry J 
Lewis Andy (C) 
Lewis ft Chapln (P) 
Lewis Fred 
Lewis Harry 8 
Lindsay Cedrlo 
Lin Sun Fong 
Loder Chaa A (C) 
Long Bud 
Loraine Mrs Oscar 
Lorrlte Billle 
Lucaty Charles 
Lucy Irene 
Lyle Mildred (C* 
Lynn Doc ' 
Lynton Mrs S 

M 
Mab A Wels 
MacClennan Kenneth 
Mack ft Doris (C) 
Mack Geo E (C) 
Madley ft Noyes (C) 



THE NEW HOME OF 

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THEATRICAL COSTUMES 

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YOUR SERVICE 

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Consult us before placing your orders 



Magee ft Anita 
Mahoney Will (C) 
Manning Mrs Peter 
Martell J 
Mason Carl 
Maxine Bros ft Bobby 
Maybelle Snowle 
McBoyle Darl 
McColgan Madge (C) 
McEvoy Nellie ft Lii- 

sle (REG) 
McGilhan C D 
Mcintosh Peggy 
McKays Tom 
McNamera Nell (SF) 
McNamee Norman (C) 
McRae Thos 
Meebans Dogs 
Melville W J (C) 
Melvern Babe 
Mercedes La Petite 

(O 
Merrltt Dorothy 
Meyers Ann 
Meyers Mrs Harvey 
Michelena Vera 
MUlettes The 
Mitchell Elbert 
Mitchell John (C) 
Moore Billy (C) 
Moore Emmett 
Moore Geo W 
Moore Irene (SF) 
Mora Mr Tess (C) 
Moray Mrs Norman 
Morella Mme ft Co 
Morehouse D (C) 
Morris Frank 
Morrow Wm 
Mortimer R M (C) 
Morton Mr A Mrs Sam 
Mueller BUI 
Muller D S (C) 
Musette Miss 

N 

Nay lor Ethel (SF) 
Nelso Craig 
Newport Hal 
Nlblo Fred 
Nolan Loutsia 
Nolan Mildred (SF) 
Norton Harry K 
Norton Mrs Ned C 



O'Brien Eugene 
O'Hara J J 
Old field J C (0) 
Onetta 

O'Rourke Bert 
Orton Mlron 



Paget Lois (C) 
Palmer Gaston 
Parker Gladys 
Patterson Jean 
Paulette Louise 
Payne Tom M (C) 
Pearl Evelyn 
Pearson Violet (C) 
Peerless Pendletons 

(C) 
Pehlman Peggy (C) 
Pendleton P 
Peterson Agnes 
Peters W Dixon 
Pettlcord Bob 
Plowden Miss D 
Pollock Emma (P) 
Poner Fred 
Porter Edw D 
Prince A Deerie 



Raffln Mrs 

Ramsey ft Kline (C) 
Rasmussen Chas (SF) 
Raymond Gert (C) 
Raymone (C) 
Reavls Ruth 
Reese A Basse 
Richards C (C) 
Rellly Chas 
Rehn Marva 
Rice! Clara (P) 
Richards Harry H 
Roberts ft Hill 
Robeson Erba 
Robins Edward H 
Rogers Ida 
Rogers Laura 
Rooney J (C) 
Roes ft Leduo 
Ross Arthur 
Rulston T E 
Runoe Horace 



Russell Dorothy 
Ryan Bros 
Rydell Helen 

S 
Santell Rudolph (C) 
Saunders Marion 
Sawtelle Erma 
Saxon Pauline \ 
Schuster Milton (C) 
Seldon Geo 
Sharp Geo E (C) 
Shea, Evelyn 
Shrlner Jos A 
Silver Mr 
Simon Louis 
Sinclair Ruth E 
Smith Eddie 
Smith Janette L 
Snell Vera 
Specks Two 
Spellman Jeannette 
Spencer Margaret 
Sports of the Alps 
Stafford J M (SF) 
Stanley Jack 
Stanton Harry (P) 
Stark Viola 
Startup Harry 
Sterling ft Loye (C) 
Stevens Mrs Leo 
Stevens Morton 
Stllb Hasel 
Stirk Cliff 
Stoner Jessie 
Stover B W 
Stremel Harry 
Stuart Austen 
Stuart Marie B 
Stuart Reggie (C) 
Sullivan Arthur Co 
Sussmsn Sol 
Sylvester Mr A Mrs L 
Sylvester Larry 



<t ' M\»" 



Tait Mildred 
Tendehoa Chief 
Thompson Sisters 
Thorn Jess 
Thurston Geo 
Tltcomb La Belle 
Tlvolera (C) 



Toner Tommy 
Totos Two 
Tracy Anna G 
Tracy Claudia (C) 
Travillas Three 
Turner Anna (C) 
Turner Chas 8 
Turner Wills (C) 
Turple Violet (C) 



Valadone Les 
Vsn A Livingstone 
Van Austin A Park 
Van Clave Harry 
Van Nostram Chas 
Vaughn Arthur (C) 
Vaughan Gus (REG) 

W 
Wallace Billy (P) 
Walmer Carl (C) 
Walters Elmer 
Ward John 
Watson A 
Wayoral M (C) 
Weber Bud 
Weber Harry A 
Weber J 
Whalte J A (C) 
White Jean 
Wilbur Miss Bunny 
Wilkinson Geo 
Williams Bert 
Williams Edw 
Williams Laurence 
Williams Lew 
Wilson Daisy (SF) 
Wilson Doris L 
Winsome Winnie 
Wlnthrop Madeline 
Wolferdon Mrs H 
Woods Thos B 
Wyndham Mae 

T 
Tettan Eurla 
Toske Bob (P) 
Young Dorothy 

Z 

Zell A Walrod 
Zlra Lillian 
Zuro Joslah 




TEAR 



"THE BALLAD SUPREME" 




KISS 




SMILE" 



Words by DARL MAC BOYLE Music by OTTO MOTZAN 

A sure tip to the wise performer ! ! ! 
Nothing in existence could prevent this song from becoming the most phenomenal hit of "Ballad-dom" in years! 

KARCZAG PUBLISHING CO M Inc. 



62-64 West 45th Street 



7th Floor 



New York City 



VARIETY 



"WATCHFUL WAITING" 

X Is net necessary for artists who only consider the merits of their offering. They know that they cannot 

afford to overlook the McKlNLEY CATALOGUE. If merit alone counts, than fat these compelling HITS: 



"WHEN SHADOWS FALL" 






By HAROLD G. FROST and E. CLINTON KEITHLEY 

Is the Greatest ballad of recent years, and wo hack it with our reputation. 

"DOWN THE SUNSET TRAIL TO 








N 









I'LL TRAVEL ON TO YOU" 









u 



By JACK FROST and E. CLINTON KEITHLEY 

Did you use "Trail of the Lonesome Pine"? Well than, our tip to you is: got this number. 

AWT GOT NOBODY 

MUCH 
AND NOBODY CARES FOR ME" 



By ROGER GRAHAM and SPENCER WILLIAMS 

Declared by Press and Public to be the Hit of Sophie Tucker's present offering. 



tt 






PARADISE BLUES 

OH PRETTY PAPA ! OH PRETTY PAPA ! " 



By WALTER HIRSCH and SPENCER WILLIAMS 

Can't you just close your eyes and see the orchestra Jass those blue notes. 






You Cant Put the Beauty Back «h n e Rose 

(After It Withers and Dies") 
By EDWARD CAVANAUGH and ROBERT ALLAN 



"On The Rockln' 





By W. BENTON OVERSTREET 



"Just Because You Won My Heart" 

By J. WILL CALLAHAN and CLARENCE M. JONES 



"WHEN I HEAR THAT 

'JAZ' BAND PLAY 

By JERRY JOYCE and EDDIE GRAY 



• f 



McKlNLEY MUSIC CO CK * CflG0 omcE: Grand opera House * uMn * 



E. CLINTON KEITHLEY, Mgr. Professional Depl 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
10 FIFTH AVE. 



32 



VARIETY 



THE ANNOUNCEMENT SkWSSSSE ERNEST R. BALL 



is always hailed with joyous delight by our thousands of friends in the singing profession — so it is with unbounded pleasure 

that we offer you his very latest 



WOULD 
YOU 



YOU 



€T±\JA 



IVIE 



and feel positive that this will prove no exception to the rule. It is another of those wonderful waltz ballads (the third writ- 
ten within a year) — and one that with his two other enormous successes, "GOODBYE, GOOD LUCK, GOD BLESS 
YOIT and TURN BACK THE UNIVERSE AND GIVE ME YESTERDAY," completes a trio of the greatest 
songs of this kind ever written. The lyric is by AL DUBIN who also wrote M f TWAS ONLY AN IRISH- 
MAN'S DREAM" and "O'BRIEN IS TRYIN' TO LEARN TO TALK HAWAIIAN," and the best we 
•« can say in its behalf is, — it's HUMAN* We submit the refrain — judge for yourselves: - 



"Would you take away from a baby 
Hi* mother's love and care? 
Would you take away from a sinner 
The kope he finds in prayer ? 



Would you take away from a song bird 

Hi* golden melody ? 
Would you leave me the bitter and take all the tweet ? 

Would you take back the love you gave me ? 









X 



Professional copies and orchestrations in 6 keys— A" (c to d"), B» (d to e»), C (e to (), D (F to g), E k (g to a"), F (a to b b ) 

y • 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHICAGO 



AL. BROWNE, Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 



M. Witmark & Sons 

Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Mgr. 

BROADWAY. NEXT T PALACE THEATRE 



PHILADELPHIA 

C • St. 

ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. 



BOSTON 

JACK LAHEY, M*r. 



MARIGOLD ROOM 

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GALAXY OP FEATURE ACTS AND NOVELTY NUMBERS 
BEAUTY CHORUS TWO ORCHESTRAS 



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MR. EDWARD BECK 



BISMARCK GARDEN 

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I 






No Extra Charge on Sunday 



We Cater to the Profession 



DORADO 

ROTISSERIE— RESTAURANT 

1599-1661 B'way 

Bet 48th and 49th Sts. 

RAZZETTI & CELLA, Inc. 

SPECIALTIES 
ChMua . .SMI 

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Palm Garden— Matte 

TabU d'Hote Lunch 45c 

Imp. A Den. Wines a Uauere 

Op«a uatfl 1A.M. Taeswi Bryaat SM 



Eddie Hay man taaa not aold out hla Interests 
In Forest Park. He says no date has been set 
for the opening next summer. 



Fred Nlxon-Nlrdllnger came In 
delphla laat week to attend to some booktSE 
matters with local agents. Frank Wolf's Ma 
waa with him. 



Frances Kennedy denies John P. Mulgrew la 
writing a new act for her, aa William B. 
Frledlander had already been commissioned to 
provide new numbers for her. 



The Metropolitan, Watertown, 8. 
Richard Hoffman's books, shelved Its reguK 
vaudeville for the first half and played 
traveling stock. 

The Bijou, Apuleton, Wis., resumed its 
devllle from Rlohard Hoffman, W. V. M 
Feb. 1, using two acts eacfrj half. A 
Begllnger operates the Bijou. 



According to the will of the late CoU 
William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody the bulk 
his estate (valued at about $65,000) goes 
Cody's widow. 



Ben J. Fuller, managing director of the 
ler Australian Circuit, has decided to 
duce "The Time, the Place and the Girl 
Sydney and has begun arrangements to obt 
a suitable cast. 



CHICAGO 

VARIETY'S CHICAGO OFFICE, Majestic Theatre Bldg. 



F. H. Graft has decided to rebuild the Grand, 
Esthcrvllle, la., notwithstanding that there 
was a $200,000 loss when the house burned. 



"The Last Chapter," by Ralph Ketterllng, 
was slipped into the Rlalto bill Saturday and 
Sunday as "augmented feature." 



Irene Iluyck (Connors and Huyck), taken 
111 at Minneapolis, suffering a nervous break- 
down. Is reported Improved. 



Colonel William Roche, former manager 
the Columbia and of late managing the Bai 
Box theatre on Madison street, has accept 
the active management of the Star A dart 
Roche taking up his new station Sunday. 

I. H. Herk and Herman Fehr, of 
waukee, will leave for New York the la 
part of this week to transact some Import 
business, the details of which Herk decllnt) 
to divulge until his return. 



* 



'i!io Wui rln^ton. Oak Peri, 111 ,..h .'U\rV . 

Kahl Griffiths is now in chargo of Orphcum 
office. 



the remainder of the winter. 



Heth Frank, prima donna with "The Four 
Husbands" (western), though suffering with 
a severe cold, refused to quit her stago work, 
i.U? Gush ordered in Pybuqup-to rrs*. 



Morris Silver Is out after a seven? attack 
of rheumatism. 



So far no plans have been made for a Hum- 
incr policy at the National. 



F. P. McCann (McCann shows) Is recover- 
ing from a recent illness. 



"In Old Kentucky," which has been playing 
ono nlgbters, has become an International 
Circuit attraction. 



INERS 



AKE-UP 



George Holland (Holland-Dockrlll), whose 

act has been with big circuses and Is now in 

vaudeville, has been very 111 at his home on 

the north side, but is able to be outdoors 

'wgahf. 



The Metropolitan, Rochester, Minn., has 
been sold by Koppelberger a Coleman, to J- 
E. Reed, who will continue the houses flv«- 
act show, booked by Richard Hoffman, W. V. 
M. A. Fred Hartmann has been managing 
the Met. 



Is! Ill NMY C VUNFH. Inr. 



Roy D. Murphy, the American booking man- 



VARIETY 



33 



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COMPLETE HOUSEKEEPING 

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TRANSFER HOTEL 

Clark Bad Division St** CHICAGO 

A Plana far Porter mers Nlos 



Catering to the Profession 

ABBEY COURT 

3120 Broadway, northeast corner 124th Street 

Furnished 1, 2 and 3 rooms, elevator, elec- 
tricity, hotel service, home comforts, tele- 
phone, housekeeping facilities, reasonable 
rates, restaurant. Convenient to Subway. 
Open Evenings Phone— 3766 Morningside 



WM. IPfNATT 



sger for the Ben J. Fuller Circuit, is lining 
up acts for the March, April and May Bail- 
ings. March 13 Rio and Helmar sail, while 
Harry Sterling leaves April 3. Frawlcy and 
West, April 24, and the Ferraros, Mny 15. 

Charles Walters, who has been manager of 
the Star & Garter here for a year and a half, 
left Tuesday for Red Hank, N. J., where he 
will retire from active theatrical life nnd tnke 
♦hlnss cany, rlanti'^h tvr r. . \r,i« , ,n»> i'tohi a 
*oa^ i'rinefesf. ilicnard Dro\\Vr ij now n. alias- 
ing the Star ft Garter. 



Dad's Theatrical Hotel 

PHILADRLPHIA 



Harry Singer, former business manager of 
the Palace, left for New York Sunday to take 
up his new duties with the Martin Beck 
forces In the Broadway Orphcum offices. Ross 
Rchno Is now looking after the Orpheum under 
Mort Singer's guidance. Kahl Griffiths Is now 
In charge of the local Orpheum. 



Frank Robinson, who claims he's a theat- 
rical man, living at the Y. M. C. A. hotel, 
was found a block away from the Kimball 

'lu'.'.tre ,'«. .Mt'.i ^!\iM Supt'oiy niv.'nt shot \1\ riie 
abdomen and ''may not 'recover. He told the 



Albertina (of the Jack Stafford companv) 
was injured last week while returning from 
South Chicago In a tHXl. A street car hit the 
rear of the machlno and bumped it in such a 
manner Albertina had her face cut by firing 
glass. Until her injuries are bitter the Staf- 
ford act has cancelled all Immediate time. 




STAYS ONI _ 

Gives a most beautiful complexion 

ITJMd for no years by Sun of th* rmfwrtnii 
for free EXOIlA samples. 



r IM 

Tel. Bryant <SSS 
7833 



The Edmonds 



•KCBtaCK 
TO TIMRS 1Q. 



Furnished Apartments 

CATERING EXCLUSIVELY TO THE PROFESSION 

776-78-80 EIGHTH AVENUE 



Between 47th and 48th Streets 

NEW YORK 

Private Bath and Phone In Each Apartment 



Office-771 EIGHTH AVENUE 



DANIEL. 



Northwest Corner 42d Street nnd 9th Avenue 
TWO BLOCKS WEST OF BROADWAY 




Telephone 18C2 Bryant 

NEW BUILDING 



(Est. 1888). 1-3 



CHABLBB MaTO 
18th Btrert. N. T. 



NEW YORK CITY 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 



84 ROOM S With Hot and Cold Running Water 



ALL MODERN IMPROVEMENTS 
HOWER BATHS 



TELEPHONE IN EVERY ROOM 
EVERYTHING NEW 



PRICES $3.50, $4.00, $4.50 WEEKLY 

CAFE AND RESTAURANT 



A CALL WILL 
CONVINCE YOU 



Bradley 



■ 



RUSH AND EAST GRAND AVI. 




^ T ^WA^IN^^!ffiSc\ ^Lf'rSSiT^^^ 

ROOMS WITH BATH, $7, ft, It, HMO 

TWO ROOM SUITE, $14. THREE ROOM SUITE, $tl. 

MODBRA 



HIGH-CLASS RESTAURANT 

ROBT. H. BORLAND, 



TE PRICES 




HILDONA COURT 

339, 341, 343, 345 and 347 Wert 45th St 

(Just off Broadway) 

(Will be in readiness early in February) 

This 6- story high type fireproof elcvstor building is the final word in refined house- 
keeping furnished spsrtments and, like Irvington Hall, Yandls Court and Henri 
Court, will be under the close scrutiny of the owners. 

Daily we hear these remsrks from tensnts: "I am so tired of hotel life I yearn for 
a place thst has welcome for a greeting, that has every facility for housekeeping 
snd yet has a hotel atmosphere where every request is not mercensry. The com- 
pactness of our kitchenettes, Isrgeness of our rooms snd the sttentiveness of 
our help make all this possible. 

It takes more than furniture to complete an apartment; the upkeep and maintenance 
must be imbued in the responsible heads. This has been our keynote; our reputa- 
tion for this is wide. 

Apsrtments consist of one, two and three-room suites, with kitchenettes and kitc hens. 
tiled bsth with shower, telephone, vacuum system snd all lstest devices. 

Maid service st nominal rstes will be a festure. Large closets, polished hardwood 
flooring throughout. Furniture in various woods to mstch. 

Rates— $13.00 Up Weekly 

For information concerning rates, etc, spply to 

YANDIS COURT, 241 West 43rd Street 

Telephone Till Bryant 



police he had been shot by a masked man In 
the basement of the theatre. 

The Al. Jolson show got some special pub- 
licity on the arrangement for Jolson to sing 
and lead several patriotic numbers at the re- 
ception Saturday afternoon tendered the re- 
turning Seventh Illinois Infantry nt the Grand 
O. II. Jc-!ae>a had- u v.?\tyt. »m;<2 nn?l vvafr till- 
able to appear. During Bevcral of the recent 
performances Jol son's cold has prevented him 
from singing all of his programed numbers. 
To make up for it Al. haa been doing a mono- 
IogiBtlc spiel. 



The Style Show opened Monday at the 
Strand theatre. Among the features Is the 
dancing act of the Dancing Kennedys, who 
have Just completed a tour of the Orphcum 
Circuit. In accepting the Fashion engage- 



ment, Mme. Edith Strickland, the Chicago 
modiste, arranged for Miss Kennedy to dis- 
play twenty-eight gowns— the newest of the 
Strickland patterns — Miss Kennedy making 
two changes for the act and wearing two dur- 
ing the afternoon and two at night. Hamilton 
Coleman is staging the revue numbers. 

"Fair and Wurm;r" lea-vte the Coit March* 
3, having completed, on that date, s run of 
20 weeks. "Goodness Gracious, Annabelle" Is 
due to follow the Sclwyn success. After 
"Annabelle" will come "Seven Chances," 
which will stay for a summer run snd which 
will be succeeded In August by "Upstairs and 
Down." This latter play, through Its author- 
ship by the Hattons, Is expected to draw the 
cream of the Chicago season. Originally "The 
1.1th Chair" was framed for the August open- 
ing at the Cort, but it seems that when that 



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THE GLORIAS THE GARDENER TRIO ETHEL KIRK 

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Supported by the Famous Rector Beauty Chorus 



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MAURICE SHERMAN, Violin 
HERBERT J. ZELLER, Clarinet 
JAS. McCLURG, Bass Saxophone 
HANS FREY, Piano 
HARRY VROOMAN, Cornet 
VICTOR COHN, Drums 





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Select Your Own Grill Specialties in the Golden 
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THE BEST ITALIAN DINNER IN THE CITY 

Lunch 50 Cents f\ W /\ Y WHP £\ ^ m ^ 75 Cents 

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Builders and pslntsrs of productions sad vaudeville 
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Broadway once. Oalety Theatre Building, Roan 4M 



J. A. MURPHY 

(ADAM SOWERGUY) 

EDITOR OF 

THE SLAPSTICK** 



In the Market to furnish 
Vaudeville Material 

Have written successes for At Jeiees. Ray Cos. 
Frank Milton. Chas. Kesae, Stoddard end Nysea. 
3 Keatons. Herbert Lloyd. McAvey aad Breaks and 

others. 

For appointment address care VARIETY. New York. 



LETER HEADS 

Contracts. Tickets, Envelope*. Free Sample*. 
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For aSale or Royalty 

Comedy Sketch— 2 men and 2 women. A Rose 
Stahl part. Only recognized people need reply. 
LAURA D. WILCK, 1025 Longacre Building. 
New York City. 

play opened at the 48th Street In New York, 
the Shuberts tied William Hsrris Jr., down 
to sn sgreement to plsy none but Shubert 
thestres on tour. 

Some inconvenience was occasioned hotel 
guests because of the automobile show, hold- 
ing out st the Colleslum snd various hotel 
drawing rooms. A number of professionals 
were auddenly forced to hunt new quarters 
on Friday last, having the alternative of pay- 
ing increased ratee for the week. Al Jolaon 
and William Hodge, who both bad suites st 
the Blsckatone, were politely told that they 
would have to occupy small single rooms for 
the week. Many persona who appealed to ho- 
tel managers for accommodations, were an- 
swered by the suggestion that they might And 
rooma in Milwaukee, from which place they 
could commute dally. The problem of finding 
quarters by artists was made unusually scute 
since four big "girl" shows sre here at the 
aame time, they being "Robinson Crusoe," the 
"Follies," "Hip, Hip, Hooray' and Katlnke." 

AUDITORIUM (Hsrry Askln, mgr.).— "Hip, 
Hip. Hooray!" getting Its shsre suto show 
crowds (second week). 

BLACKSTONB (Rdwin Wspplsr, mgr.).— 
"Anns snd the Girl" (Cyril Scott), drawing 
very well (second week). 

COHAN'S GRAND (Hsrry Ridings, mgr.).— 
"Turn to the Right," poeitive big money-getter 
(third week). 

COLONIAL (Norman Field, mgr.).— "Intol- 
erance" (film), big profit (tenth week). 

CHICAGO (Louis Judah. mgr.) .— "Kstlnks" 
(T. Roy Bsrnes), returned for big opening 
Sunday night. 

CORT (U. J. Hermann, mgr.).— "Fair snd 
Wsrmer," continues surprising business (25th 
week). 

COLUMBIA (E. A. Wood, mgr.).— "Mslds 
of Ame rica. " 

ENGL&7WOOD (J. D. Whitehead, mgr.).— 
"The Record Breakers" (burlesque). 

OARRICK (Ssm Corson, mgr.).— "Robinson 
Crusoe, Jr." (Al. Johnson), capacity (fifth 

OAYETY (Robt 8ohonecker, mgr.).— "The 
Darling* of Paris" (burlesque). 

HAYMARKET (Art. H. Moeller, mgr.).— 
"Fads and Foil lee" (stock burlesque). 

IMPERIAL (Will Spink. mgrOT— "In Old 
Kentucky." 

ILLINOIS (Rolls Tlmponl, mgr.).— Z leg f eld 
"Follies." very big (aUth week). 

LITTLE THEATRE (Maurice Browne, dlr.). 
— Little Theatre stock. 

NATIONAL (John Barrett, mgr.).— "Little 
Peggy O' Moore." 

OLYMPIC (George Warren, mgr.).— "Potosh 
a Perlmutter In Society" (Barney Bernard), 
limited engagement, opened Sunday night. 

PLAYHOUSE (Albert Perry, mgr.).— Port- 
manteau Theater Co. 

POWERS (Hsrry Powers, mgr.).— "The 
Boomerang," high b. o. speed (twelfth week). 

PRINCESS (Will Singer, mgr.).— "Fixing 
Sister" (William Hodge), drawing profitably 
(sixth week). 

STAR ft GARTE7R (William Roche, mgr.).— 
"20th Century Maids." 

STUDEBAKER Louis Jones, mgr.).— Annette 
Kellermann (film), cspsclty. 

MAJESTIC (Fred Eberts, mgr.; agent, Or- 
pheum). — The Majestic show ss trotted on 
parade Monday ran more to quantity than any- 
thing else. t Inasmuch ss the town la full of 
vlaitors, the Majestic received its share of the 
transients, who with the homegusrders filled 
the house comfortably. "Motoring" had them 
howling. It was specially booked, and it was 
"wise booking," for anything pertaining to sn 
auto wss surefire. Cloalng the vaudeville sec- 
tion was "The Forest Fire," %hlch furnished 
the thrill. It made it hsrd for the film, 
"Patrls," to follow. Pi clot snd Scofleld opened 
the ahow and did it creditably. "Motoring" 
was next. Mucn interest wss centered locally 
in the vaudeville debut of Capt. Adrian C. 
Anson and bis two daughters. The applause 
was spontaneous and the audience clamored 
for more. Act much better than Anson's moat 
sanguine friends expected and the entire turn 
was very well received. Pop acquitted him- 
self like a stage veteran and when it comes 
to dancing shows Mike Donlln up. Two laugh- 
ing hits were recorded in quick successive 
fashion by Henry B. Toomer and Co. in "The 
Headllners" snd Harry Green and players in 
"The Cherry Tree." Both were showered with 
much srplama Crate & Campbell mixed 
ald-'uUJabers with grdtid opera, and' got away 
with It admirably. Not in a long time baa 
Charles Howard bagged such a hit as he did 
Monday. Those pedal acrobatics caused in- 
cessant laughter. Howard's company Included 
Margaret Taylor and Hal Pine, with Miss Tay- 
lor looking most becoming in a blsck out- 
fit. Mark. 



McVICKER'S (Jones, Llnlck A Schaefer, 
mgre. ; agent, Loew). — Not that the big Madi- 
son street playhouse needed any of the suto 
show visitors to help swell Its coffers, but 
Jones, Llnlck ft Schaefer thought It would 
show the proper spirit to have something with 
a gaaollne buggy atmosphere on the stage, so 
they booked In the "Auto Speed Mechanics" 
for the week. It is the asms act booked for 
McVicker's some* weeks sgo, but owing to fire 
lew restrlctiona waa unable to fulfill Its en- 

Sigement. The msln thing of lntereet at 
cVicker'a this week la the announcing ex- 
periment being tried, with Bob Hall doing the 
Jim Morton stunt. Hall is the biggest favor- 
ite imaginable st McVicker's, snd has plsyed 
the house often, yet the "before snd sfter each 
act" service had him working under apparent 
difficulty Monday. This wss prebsbly due to 
hia un familiarity with the acts snd not hav- 
ing the light line on just what would form 
hia announcements. Perhaps when Bob hss 
'em educated to anticipate, all may be well 
and good, but there was much speculation 
Monday. Bob would do hia audience a favor 
by walking down to the center footlight space 
for each announcement, aa McVicker's is too 
big a house for him to stick to the sides. He 
also shows an over eagerness to get on and 
off, just the reverse of the alow-walking Jim 
Morton. Hall wants to leave snd plsy travel- 
ing dates. The ahow Monday didn't stack up 
well on the first time. The house filled up 
fsst. Armstrong, Downey snd Armstrong 
opened with their cycling turn, while Don 
and Mable Garrison followed In "one." Olson 
and Johnson drag out their act and one sec- 
tion could stand chopping altogether. One of 
•the boys attempts too much snd thereby puts 
on brskes when speed should be Injected. 
Hardworking chaps and very willing to ahow 
every bit of versatility, but they ahould hold 
some of it In reserve. Wllmer Water* snd 
Co. offered "The Lste Vsn Camp" — a comedy 
turn with a supposed dead man watching his 
business rival sttempt to mske love to his 
"widow" — Is not new to local vaudeville goers, 
yet st McVicker's the lsugha came fsst at the 
farcical situations. Cast somewhat changed 
around In past season, yet sufficiently plsyed 
to entertain the pop house crowds. Following 
a Metro travelog showing the Yale-Princeton 
football game Harry Sullivan and Co. ap- 
peared. Sulivan recites the tale of the fsted 
jockey who rode to his death, etcetera. As 
there was sn aching void In the bill hero for 
sentiment thst tugs st the heartstrings the 
recitation was applauded. Sullivan and "Co." 
could use some timely, brighter and snsppler 
crossfire. The line "you used to wear pants" 
ought to come out. Cecil snd Msck did well 
with songs. The Breen Family were a hit. 
The spot was right snd their comedy snd jug- 
gling hit a responsive chord. Other turns 
were the Speed Machinists. Clsud fnd Marion 
Cleveland and the Four Chicks. Mark. 

PALACE? ( Ross Behne, mgr. ; agent, Or- 
pheum). — A whale of a show thst seemed to 
have everything, and especially rich in com- 
edy, sent a capacity audience away In rare 
humor. The running order of the bill necessi- 
tated two stage waits and made it Imperative 
for Bert Levy to occupy the cloalng spot. He 
was on st 10.56 Monday night, wisely con- 
densing hia act to six minutes, thereby effect- 
ively holding in practically the entire house. 
Sophie Tucker, slwsys s Chlcsgo favorite, wss 
In prime fettle snd with her syncopated five- 
man orchestra, the act resulted In a riot effect. 
They rolled the plsno out for Williams snd 
Wolfus, then had to trundle it off again. Will- 
iams taking himself off until Miss Tucker 
could thank her admirers. Then Williams 
brought his misfit shoes and squeaky voice on 
for another 25 minutes that had the house In 
an uproar. Williams and Wolfus held the 
next to closing spot in ideal fashion. Kalmar 
and Brown preceded Miss Tucker, they, too, 
scoring roundly Kalmar and Brown were 
originally programed No. 4, but exchanged 
places with Laura Nelson Hall, in the sixth 
spot. Thst the rearrangement was best showed 
in the results, for Miss Hall's piaylet Isn't 
anything startling and suffers because of the 
two rather amateurish assisting players. Orth 
and Dooley placed in the middle of the show 
and directly after Miss Hall ran along esslly 
with Dooley's comic falls winning a deal of 
laughs. Dugan and Raymond landed well up 
with the comedy features of the ahow. They 
use a prop auto that does stunts through s 
connecting rod reaching behind the drop. 
Bensee and Baird occupied the second spot 
very cleverly, Miss Baird flashing s humorous 
style that quickly caught on. Queenle Dunedin 
opened, giving the proceedings a healthy push. 
R I ALTO (Hsrry Earl, mgr.; sgent, Loew- 
Frank Q. Doyle). — This new Jones, Llnlck 4 
Schaefer house, in its second week, looks ss 
if it will become a big money maker. There 
wps caperlty before coon Monday* the doors 
opening dally at eleven. - It la a spleudidiy 
built structure, clever planning allowing for 
1 ,600 capacity, although the plot la only 100 x 
100 feet. There Is s mezzanine floor sssting 
300, where smoking is allowed and where the 
top, admission price is charged. A seven-act 
show with a comedy Aim runs continuously, 
although ten sets sre really booked and so 



•nns.ej gESB C ICsCKS I 

Lehigh \felley TfcUlro a «J 

r, tf.St Taeootto, tMJs 

*»_ Chisago, Hs IS 




If ] on want any 

W. B. Liadaoy. E. P. A^ 
Bryaat 4*12. 
JL SIMMONS. A. *. P. A. 
Tiekot Office, B'way ex 4Zmd ft* Now York 



STUART BARNES 

Is one of the headline features at the Palso* 
Theatre this weak. All hia new talking material 
waa written by 
JAMES MADISON. 1493 Broadway. New York 




GuerriniCo. 




Awa^ OoJ^ Isjadal. 
Fraadseo, IflU 



HIPPODROME 



"THE BIG SHOW * rt&Ja™ 
(herself) KELLERIVIANN 

la a new WATER SPECTACLE 
*^^a^ M woVasS UL TMI ^ 




CECIL JEFFERSON 



J. B. MaKOWEM. 




sCststfaftBrt, 




WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS $5.00 



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~Let Ue Prove W V 1 It k Beet ♦> 
Send for Price List snd Color Card 

HI We*t 48th Street New York Q ty 

JUGGLERS 
WANTED 

Club and hoop jugglers preferred, but can use 
novelty jugglers. For girl act. 
Address, stating all first letter. 

KARTELLO AND STODDARD 
318 Hudson St.. Buffalo. N. Y 



The 
Tailor 



Mack, 

1582-1584 BROADWAY 

Opp. Strand Theatre 

722-724-726 SEVENTH AVE. 

Opp. Columbia Theatre 

HABERDASHERIE SHOP 
715 SEVENTH AVE. 

Few Door* Above Columbia 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 



.'* t oAii mt -.• .at Mmjvhm*- «<a 



|>^— 1 *> S— »— n l ■ * *S n »-»s4».*.*»,t^^,iJ.-^ » «—i i Si <-. v « 



■* » •»-**-» • ■• -*■• »-» « 



" "" ■ '■ ■ 



VARIETY 



ac 



37 






* . • i* *.,. 



9E3E®, 



*<£«• 



Jerome H.Remick&Co. 

ZI9 West 46»St.New\brkCfty I 137 West Fort St. Detroit 

Majestic Theatre Bk^Chicagp 



"BECAUSE YOU'RE IRISH" 

By GUS KAHN and EGBERT VAN ALSTYNE 

Com* in and hoar one of the be.t Irish songs in the market. It is now. Everybody 
wants to hoar an Irish Song. Ono of Van Alystyno's host molodios and a groat 

lyric by Gus Kahn. 

A FEW MORE NEW REMICK STAR NUMBERS 



"Where the Black Eyed Susans Grow" 

By RADFORD and WHITING 

Composer, ef "Mammy'* Uttla Coal Black Rose" 

"And Tkey Called It Dixie Land" 

THAT'S SOME REFERENCE!! 



"There's Egypt in Your Dreamy Eyes" 

By FLETA JAN BROWN and HERBERT 

SPENCER 
Writer* el "Underneath the Stan" and thie to 
their successor. What a wonderful lyric and 
meledy this son* contains 1 If* the beet thin* 
Fleta Jan Brown and Herbert Spencer have ever 
written. 



"IF YOU EVER GET LONELY" 

By GUS KAHN and HENRY MARSHALL 

Here* a groat song that has just "Snoaked" its way through. Wo woro wondering 

why tho song public didn't pick up this novelty and right now everybody wants it. 

Send for tho host singlo or doublo novelty song by that novelty song writer, 

Henry Marshall. 



"She's Dine All the Time" 

By AL BRYAN and HARRY TIERNEY 

"Who's Pretty Baby Are You Now?' 

By KAHN and VAN ALSTYNE 

"Down Honolulu Way" 

By DEMPSEY-BURTNETT and BURKE 



"Mammy's Little Coal Black Rose" 

By EGAN and WHITING 

"How's Every Little Thing in Dixie 

By JACK YELLEN and ALBERT GUMBLE 



» J 



"Just a Word of Sympathy' 

By KAHN and VAN ALSTYNE 



AND 



"THE WORLD BEGAN WHEN I MET YOU" 

By HUGH ALLAN— STANLEY MURPHY— ALBERT GUMBLE 

A wonderful high class song. 



\ 












/ 



f V 



• - , • 



VAftiifV 



B. F. Keith's 

« 

Circuit 
UnitedBooking 

Offices 

(Asaa») 

A. PAUL KEITH, Pr M l*at 
E F. AUE& Vke-PretieW end Ganard Maaeger 

FOR BOOKING ADDRESS 

S. K. HODGDON 



Palace Theatre Building 



New York City 



Feiber & Shea 



1493 Broadway 

(Putnam Building) 

New York City 




MARCUS LOEW BOOKING AGENCY 

NEW ENGLAND HEADQUARTERS 

Tremont Theatre Building, BOSTON, MASS. 
FRED MARDO, Manager 

Consecutive Booking arranged for Vaudeville Acta in the New England Stataa 



HOME OF RECOGNIZED VAUDEVILLE 

UNION BOOKING OFFICE Ly " um "STf*** 

188 Randolph St., DETROIT, MICH. 

Booking Acts of Merit Feature Acts wanted at all timet. 

WRITE or WIRE us. 
MANAGERS desiring first class bookings— we adrise you to get in 

iOUwh wltL US. - • -v.. - 

■II' I 



shifted that each act fires four shows dally. 
The hill for the first half was an entertain- 
ing one, even though It held two "nance" 
characters. One was with the trio, Sherman, 
Van and Hymen, and the other with the girl 
act. "The Fa-Mail Clerks/' aad while both 



worked along different lines, there was too 
much of It. The trio scored solidly, the 
"nance" supplying ths ace. He says he has 
studied abroad and wears a woman's cost 
given to him "by a 'broad ' " bat they laughed 
at It The girl act did fairly, it suffers from 



Enterprises 

■ Iri'^MUMIflr — — • 

General Executive Offices 

Putnam Building Times Square 

New York 



1 • 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Schanck PereonaJJy Interviews Artists Daily 

Between 11 and 1 

Cfcicagra Offsets Boston Offices 

North ftsasrisaa Builcfing Tremont Theatre Building 

FRANK Q. DOYLE, in char gw FRED MARDO, hi charge 

AcU laying off in Southern territory 

-,.l^ . Slkla - SB 

wire cms evict 





INDEPENDENT 



RCUI 



VAUDEVILLE 



firat 



la the Far West. 

executive orn 

to Ave 
ieata by 



Steady CeeiaecudTe Work for Novelty Feature 
ZAJtTHEATRE BLDO. SAN FRANCISCO 



sailings of beats 



95% 

way Tr., Alfred Holt, 



of all artists going to Europe make their st« 
us. The following nave: 

Harry Houdini, Hardeen, Daisy Harcourt, Jsmes Harrigan, 
Ah Sid, Annie Hill, Hayman and Franklin, Hera a Family, Tom 
lolt, Frank Hartley, Horton and Lindon, Albert Hickcy, Hathawi 



ship srrangements through 

Harding snd 

* v «. Hearn, Hollo* 

athaway and SiegeL 



PAUL T AUSIG A BOM, 1st E. 14th St, New Yerk City 



WANTED 



CAN PLACE A-l COMEDY TRIO or 
Quartette, for Thirty Weeks selaa. 
R1ALTO BOOKING OFFICES, MSI 
(Phone. Bryant 1711). New 



too much talk and too little real singing. 
Chester Oruber started something with his 
prop dog and political speech. Schooler and 
Dickinson ran as favorites and supply a classy 
musical offering for pop. Bruce, Duffet and 
Co., in a comedy playlet with a novel situ- 
ation, were amusing, the action supposedly 
occurring atop a 45-story building. Valentine 
Vox, a neatly working ventriloquist', displayed 
his tricky voice by a double-tone song that 
gave him a good finish. He works his dummy 
while seated across the table several feet from 
it Kelll, an accordlanlst, filled his spot nicely, 
the house insisting on an encore. Ollle and 
Johnny Vance fared well with a tight wire 
turn, both displaying many nervy stunts. In 
additon there were Doris Ernie, a songstress, 
and Campbell and Meeker (old Smith and 
Campbell turn). 



SAN FRANCISCO 

VARIETY'S 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

PANTAOE3' THEATRE BLDG. 



ORPHEUM (Fred Henderson, gen. mgr. ; 
agent, direct). — Bddle Leonard and Co., welt 



received. Homer B. Mason and Marguerite 
Keeler In sketch, "Married," big hit. Mabel 
HusbcII and Marty Ward and Co. and Mile. 
Vera Sabina and Co. repeated their success of 
last week, being the holdovers. Bernard Rlggf 
and Myrtle Ryan provided an enjoyable num- 
ber. Bankoff and Girlie with their ballei, 
pleasing opening number. Anna Cbandleo 
usual success. Six Water Lilies, scored. 

PANTAQE3— The George Primrose Co, 
made an excellent closing number. Resists, 
good. Gilroy, Haynes and Montgomery, scored. 
Izetta was a fast and entertaining opening 
act. Weber and Elliott secured good returns. 
Leo and May Jackson did fairly with their 
bicycle act. and 'The Lass of the Lumber- 
lands," the feature picture, completed the bill. 

EMPRESS. — Parker and Butler, entertain- 
ing. Van Slclen Leander Trio • was a first- 
rate closing number. Bonomar Arabs were 
liked. Milch and Morton opened the show. 
Martini and Msxlmllllan passed. Lewis end 
Leopold did well. Four Kastlng Kays pleased. 

CQRT (Homer F. Curran^mjnv\.— "Fair »n* 
Warmer" (3d week). 

COLUMBIA (Gottlob, Marx a Co., mgr.).— 
"Garden of Allah" (3d week). 

ALCAZAR (Belasoo * Mayer, mgrs.)*— Dra- 
matic Stock, "The Bubble" (1st week). 



VARIETY 



39 




The Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association 

MORT SINGER, General Menecer 

Majestic Theatre Building, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Harry Rickard's Tivoli Theatres 



LTD. 
AUSTEAUA 

And AFFILIATED CIRCUITS, INDIA end AFRICA 

Combined Capital, $3,000,000 

HUGH McINTOSH, Governing Director 



Registered Cable Address: "HUGHMAC," Sydney 

Head Office. TIVOLI THEATRE, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 

NEW YORE OFFICES: 311 Straad Theatre Bide 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 



J. H. ALOZ 



BOOKING AGENCY 



WIGWAM (Jos. F. Bauer, mgr.).— Del S. 
Lawrence Dramatic Players (86th week) . 

PRINCESS (Bert Levey, lessee ft mgr.; 
agent, Bert Levey). — Vaudeville. 

HIPPODROME (Edwin A. Morris, mgr.; 
agent, Ackerman A Harris ft W. V. M. A.). — 
Vaudeville. 



seating the Continental Hotels, here and Los 
Angeles. 

The Theatrloal Federation will hold a meet- 
ing early next month to discuss the recently 
enacted antl-plokctlng ordinance. 

When "Fair and 1 Warmer" departed Betty 
Blye was replaced in the cast by Evelyn Dun- 
can, the former being obliged to return home 
to her mother's bedside, who was critically ill 
at the time. 



Fred Henderson has gone north to look over 
that section of the Orpneum Circuit. 



Barney Goldstein is now in Portland repre- 



The Garrick, formerly the old Orpheum, 
lately playing pictures, closed last week. 

The Grand, Seattle, was burned to the 
ground last week by lire, causing considerable 
damage and loss of two lives. The cause is 
of unknown origin. The Are was discovered 
at 6 a. m., and well under way before the fire 
apparatus arrived. Two firemen perished. The 
wardrobe of acts appearing was destroyed. 
The house formerly played the John Cort 



VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

B. 8. MOSS 

President 

General Executive Offices i 

729 7th AVE. AT FORTY-NINTH ST. 

M. D. SIMMONS 

General Booking Manager 

ARTISTS can secure long engagements by booking direct with us 



FULLER'S VAUDEVILLE 

AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Managing Director, BEN J. FULLER 

Now arranging bookings for following sailings out of Saa Francisco i 
"Ventur«"-March 1J "Sonoma"-April 14 "Llam^-June S 

"Uerra--April 3 "Vsntura"-May 1$ "Sonoma"-Jun« If 

American Booking Manager, ROY D. MURPHY 

BEN. J. FULLERS CHICAGO BOOKING DIPT. 
WESTERN VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION, ilth FLOOR. CHICAGO. ILL. 



ANYTHING PERTAINING TO VAUDEVILLE 
NEW AND EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL 
LET'S BRUSH UP YOUR ACT 

J. P. MEDBURY. Material Writ* GARFIELD KILGOUR, Lyric Writer 

ROEHM & RICHARDS CO. i 

21S Strai Tfctttri Cnldlai Broadway at 47th Strati. New York City 




ACADEMY 

BUFFALO 

BIG FEATURE ACTS WANTED. 

vvmn o\> WIMI: 



wmam—mmmmm—M—mmmmm 

road attractions and later went Into vaude- 
ville. 

A suit to recover four diamond rings or 
their value has been started by Gertrude 
O'Malley (pictures) against Joseph R. Bowless, 
a millionaire of Portland. She claims he un- 
lawfully took the rings from her, saying he 
wished to have them reset, and failed to re- 



VICTORIA 

ROCHESTER. 

BIG FEATURE ACTS WANTED. 

wRire ok wirc 



turn the rings after having them In his pos- 
session a few years. 

An offer was made last week by Oertrudo 
Le Orande, contemplating a stock company to 
stage Bhakesperlan plays, of $500 a week for 
the Municipal Auditorium, Oakland. 

Richard Sterling. Jack Bryce and Albert Van 



THF, SONG IN T M K HEAR I () F T HE PUBLIC 



TT 



I 



I 



I 



l 



ihe sensational song hit of thr hour. If you 
.... going West, SING A HIT— BE A HIT. 



WATERSON. BERLIN 



SNYDER 



Strand Theatre Bldi*., 47th St. and Broadway. jNi w York 

CHICAGO— 81-83-85 Randolph Street BOSTON— 220 Tremonl Str< < t 

THANK CLARK, Chicago Manager MAX WINSLOW, New York Managei 



P. S. 



Art you lookin , f<<i • i • .<l 
< omi <lv ..oi>' lii>, tin ii 

1 «. > t > uv r« \i v ~<vi r* i h t- •«?•'.«. « 



40 



VARIETY 



A LAUGH IN EVERY LINE 

SINCE MAGGIE DOOLEY 

LEARNED 
THE HOOLEY HOOLEY 



Talk about an I'ish song! We published 
"Knock the L Out of Kelly" and "Arrah 
(lo On" and we claim this is the funniest 
one of thrm all. Plenty of catch lines. 

SING A HIT— BE A HIT. 



Are you looking for a novelty Chinese 
song? If SO turn to our adv. on the next 



*$■> # • • • *•» * - $ \ • 



w » • -v m ' * ' 9 i * 



tll-*/M> 



►* .% • m • if *s **» *• ■ » • • ••••»■«■ 



K'«-<M< Mi 



IRENE BORDONI 



OF 



• 



pa 



ELLIS and BORDONI 

Sing the International 
Song Sensation 

"A BROKEN DOLL'' 



AT KEITH'S 






STRAND THEATRE BUILDING 
47th St. and Broadway, New, York. 

H CHICAGO BOSTON- 

SI 5 Randolph St. 220 Tremont Street 

FRANK CLARK, Chicago Mgr. MAX WINSLOW, N. Y. Mgr 



Riverside or Alhambra Theatre 



NEXT WEEK 



Antwerp are at the Wigwam, having formerly 
played with the Alcaxar Players. 

Forced to leave Lot Angeles with rather 
small box office returns, Richard Ordynskt 
accepted the offer to stage the coming pro- 
duction at the Metropolitan opera house, New 
York, thereby cancelling his production of 
"Every woman" here. Big preparations were 
being made to giro him a royal welcome and 
tae papers gare considerable space to bis ex- 
pected airtral. 

The Novel Bros., playing the Pantages Cir- 
cuit, were offered a tan weeks' contract by 
the Portola Louvre management, but owing to 
their pre s ent contract having some time be- 
fore expiring, while the salary also came In 
for discussion, they declined It. 

Fred Meroey of N. Yakima. Wash., owner 
of the two houses there playing a split week 
of vaudeville and* road attractions waa In 
town last week. 

The Republic, booked by the Ackerman £ 
Harris interests, will hereafter play vaude- 
ville Sundays only, tho bouse either being 
dark throughout the week or playing pic- 
tures. 



Irving Ackerman has completed a new sketch 
entitled "A Romance of Hawaii" calling for 
11 people. It is being staged by Walter Mon- 
tague. 



Wc Invite all Sinking Members of the Theatrical Profession to Examine an Assortment of 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



i M\ 'ljppl\ NOW W i' 1 ' lh< kit ' ■' ' 



i v » I hi 



• ippoi 



' 



\ t ><J \» At\ t I l> I IT.pt • ■ \ • S ' 'I 'I .« ' I 
' .^ 1 t tl ^ • ■ I < .1 ' 111 ' • 



*\ v^ill i l.<HI\ cf«'mon*tratr the-.' ** 

III fi v • v < I \ I I )| • H ,»(!<) f 1 



( Ml (il'UKIII I n|'» \> 






KNICKERBOCKER HARMONYSTUDIOS 



Charlie Alphln, who will produce the shows 
at the Burbank, Los Angeles, for "Wild Bill" 
Welghtman, came in recently to engage people 
for the company. From the present outlook, 
Alphln will have quite a Job securing what he 
wants, new faces. 



The first anniversary of their wedding was 
celebrated last week while playing the Pant- 
ages, Oakland, by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wood 
(Evelyn Phillips) (Wood, Melville and Phil- 
lips). 

The local Hippodrome will present a new 
front within a short time, the management 



taking down the portiere that formerly aided 
in dividing the lobby from and keeping some 
of the street noise out of the house. A glass 
partition is being built. The new idea is more 
attractive and substantial than the other. 



Sam Harris (Ackerman ft Harris) returned 
rather abruptly last from the north, where he 
was supposed to stay for some time. He 
claimed the northern cold did not agree with 
him, although he waa there long enough to 
secure snother date for his chain of Hippo- 
drome theatres. Seattle has been added, mak- 
ing a split with Portland, playing the regular 
road shows Intact. 



HIPPODROME 1 .— Tho most conspicuous thing 
about this house Is the continuous crowds 
going In and out, the best reason for the ca- 
pacity attendance that can be found there any 

evening. While the matinee business Is good 
enough to probably return a profit, It does In 
no way compare with the heavy .patronage in 
the evening. The Deldas opened for the show 
seen with a painting novelty, easily , be 
called that through the method employed. 
While everything points towards Its success, 
the act does not appear quite finished. The 
drawings attract attention, the closing 

one appears to simply paBs without notice. One 
thing in particular that should immediately be 






» .« • 



- - **** 



4 

Management 



BEST WISHES 

HARRY WEBER 



KEITH CIRCUIT 




fc^ , w *.«fc4 T * H — MU fJ** -• 



-3— _. 



VA-RTETY 



-«•-—>• 



~»T 






() V KR-NIGII f 



S E N S A I I O N 



U 



1 




This is a new idea in Chinky song with one of th< at< t double versions 

written. A hit from start to fuush SING A HIT BE A HIT, 



WATERSON, BERLIN 



SNYDER 



Strand Theatre BIdg., 4 7th St. and Broadway, New York 

CHICAGO- 81-83-85 Randolph Street BOSTON 220 Tremont Street 

FRANK CLARK, Chicago M «...,. , MAX WINSLOW, New York Mana?jei 



P. S. 



Are you looking for ,< i < .tl 
pre! ' \ ra If 

turn to our «* < 1 v nt\ i\\>- 
next | 



. 



^ 



NHL MfflLEY IS NOT DEAD 



(broke or otherwise) 



Opened this week (Jan. 29) Nomatter where 



looked after, also the eaeel upon which ts 
placed the carde designating what it being 
done with the brush. When the spot Is thrown 
upon -that it throws a harmful glare into the 
eyes of the audience, and for a while prac- 
tically blinds them, and mainly through It 
the sign cannot be read. Otherwise it can be 
accepted as an excellent opener for some of 
the smaller bills. Mayne and Mayne (man 
end woman) engage in the conventional black- 
face talk, the woman predominating through 
her superior quality as a straight compared 
to the comedian's work. She might make an 
acceptable single, with her tan make-up, hay- 
ing the delivery, and does considerable more 
while on the stage alone than work In* with 
her partner. It may be better for her to drop 
the dancing. She Is a bit to heavy to try 
steps and it detracts from her good appear- 



ance. The comedian missed a number of 
chances to ad lib. Bstelle Wardwette and Co., 
the familiar (in the east) comedy skit, "A 
Honeymoon In the Catakllls," got laughter, al- 
though the piece at present cannot be com- 
pared as when formerly played. Following a 
break In the show came George Hussey with 
s couple of dummies. He handles three dum- 
mies in all, and changes his voice accordingly, 
but little change In the voice can Lo detected. 
It Is difficult to clearly understand him. The 
talk needs rearranging. All new talk would 
do him no harm. His strongest point is the 
walking of the dummies. Ingalls and Duffleld 
were next to closing with a weak arrange- 
ment of song and patter. Nothing directly 
to guide them through their present routine, 
and naturally everything attempted appears 
to be poorly handled. The wedding number 



for a oloser Is a rather old Idea at this time, 
and It would be advisable to Insert danolng, 
and drop some of the unnecessary talk that 
gets them nothing, other than an occasional 
smile. The closing dance pulled them across 
to some extent, but hardly enough to guaran- 
tee them a position among the applause get- 
ters of the bill. The entire material being 
used at present might be discarded without 
any loss, and It should not be hard to locate 
better matter to All Its place. The 10 Nyren 
Dancers closed the program In Egyptian 
dancers, the chorus doing some nice routine 
work, although making It appear too me- 
chanical for real effect. Other than holding 
the full stage during changes, and displaying 
a couple of mediocre steps, the eolo dancer 
has nothing In her fsvor. When in the line, 
she appears to be perfectly at home. 



ATLANTA. 

BT LINTON K. STARR. - 

FORSYTH (George H. Hickman, mgr.; 
agent, U. B. O.). — George Demerol Co., head- 
lining, pace setter throughout. Scored em- 
phatically. Merles' Cockatoos, good novelty 
opener. Kramer and Kent, well received. Herr 
Jensen and malde, strict sttention. Watson 
Sisters, big. Oscar Lorraine, very funny. 
Four Wire Kings, excellent closing. 

ATLANTA (Homer George, mgr.). — "It Pays 
to Advertise" drew good Monday night. 80-31, 
Cyril Maude in 'Grumpy." 1-2, Julian Eltinge. 

RIALTO (H. C. Fourton, mgr.; pop vaude- 
ville).— "Broadway Review." attractive head- 
line, first half. La Emma, . "Aerial Venue," 
Kauffman and Lillian, Conroy and O'Donnell. 
Eddie Hill. Last half, Joy Riders, Helen 
Jackley, Togan and Geneva. 



■V* 



':<< 



; 1 



& 



¥ 



THE RALPH DUNBAR PRODUCTIONS 



WESTERN OFFICES 
HOLLAND HOTEL, CHICAGO 



HERM1NE SHONE AND CO. in "Every Girl," or 
Seven Episodes in the life of "Mary Ann." 



AND 



EASTERN OFFICES 
802 PALACE THEATRE BLDG., NEW YORK 

EATION8- 

'THE MAIDS OF KILLARNEY," featuring the famous 
KIRKSMITH SISTERS jn an artistic tribute to OLD IRELAND. 



Artists of established reputation are invited to consult us in regard to new vehicles, productions, etc 

RALPH DUNBAR, General Manager HARRY WEBER, General Representative 



THANKS TO 

Mr. JOSEPH SCHENCK 

We are playing our 

Fifth tour of the Loe w Circuit 

Our act is different from any other in the profession, in that it 
combines high class, artistic dancing, comedy and a new idea in 
aerial gymnastics. 

The dressing is original and attractive. 

GIURAN and NEWELL 

Care VARIETY, New York 









1917— The Season's First Sketch Success— -1917 



RYDER 



. > . ** i » ■ » , » . 




., .... ,. 




ILKA DIEHL 



AND CO. in 



"HUMAN NATURE" 

A COMEDY ROMANCE by HAROLD A. CLARKE 

Stage Direction 
HENRY CHESTERFIELD 






Management 
HARRY WEBER 




P. DODD ACKERMAN 
SCENIC STUDIOS, Inc. 

140 West Mth Street, 
New York Gty 

STAGE DECORATIONS 
FOR VAUDEVILLE 



We 



Iteil 



rhere we will 
el the 



"THE MODERNISTIC STUDIO" 






ORAND (Out Greening, mgr. ; Loew's).— 
Owen McGlveney, entertaining ; Jermone and 
Carson, Sallle Fields, Ed and Minnie Foster, 
Martin and Mack, are very well received. 

^■^■■— ^ 
The Lyric will reopen Feb. 5 ai a feature 
picture house. 



For the first time since the opening of hia 
house here Marcus Loew swept aside his vau- 
deville policy Thursday night and the Grand 
was given over to a recital by Alma Oluck. 



LUtilMORL 



By TWLAMQIB D. OTOOLB. 

MARYLAND (F. C Schanberger, mgr.).— 
Ruth 8t. Denis headlines with her dancers. 
She is enthusiastically received. The rest of 
the bill is unusually lengthy and up to the 
standard. Marie Nordstrom Is a clever en- 
tertainer even If she does wear a pink dress 
with her red hair. Arthur Sullivan, assisted 
by Rice a Scott, presents a ridiculous sketch. 
Bert Hanlon returns with chatter that gets 
over. The Five Musical Gormans are more 
pleasing to the eye than they are to the ear. 
Dorothy Granville Is pretty and sings well. 
Stone and McBvoy have a nonsense that 
pleases. DeLeon and Davles present their 
burlesque movies ; and the Carmen Trio Jug- 
gle. An Instalment of the film "Patrla" Is 
also shown, but falls to bold the interest. 

FORDS (C. E. Ford, mgr.).— "The Birth of 
a Nation" returns for two weeks at half prices. 
Doing very well. 

ACADEMY (H. Henkll, mgr.).— 'Ben Hur," 
with A. H. VanBuren, a local stock favorite 
of a couple of years ago, In the title role ; 
has played here a number of times but in 
still drawing good houses. 

AUDITORIUM (International Circuit).— 
Thurston exhibits his magic and 1b drawing 
well. 

LOEWS (Geo. McDemitt, mgr.).— Al Golem 
and company of 20 do remarkable acrobatic 
stunts In lightning speed. Tom Kelly has 
humorous stories; "The Man lu the Dark," 
melodramatic; Buhla Pearl sings: Ed and 
Lack Smith dance ; Glrard and Onrdner, cora- 
H(ly i».ktt, a.\A ll\ .vr> tiiKl- Ijy.i* )\ d.w..i-. 

NIXON S (C. Throop, mgr). -Madame 
Sumlko, assisted by four Geisha girls, heads 
good bill. The Wells-Oxford quintet play 
basket ball on wheels. Nip and Tuck, Dunlay 
and Merrill, Swain's Rats. 

GARDEN (Geo. Schneider, mgr.).- "The 
Good Old Summer Time," rural musical com- 



$14 



• II 



PER W% L 
WEEK H\JV 



i Miantes 



& BATH FOR 2 



$16 Up. WEEK SUITES ROOM & BATH FOR 2 



UfM, Airy, with ell 



REISENWEBER'S HOTEL 



5M STREET AND 
COLUMBUS CIRCLE, N. Y. 



edy, headlines ; Putnam and Lewis, come- 
dians ; Lyrlcia, sings ; the Styner Trio, acro- 
bats ; the comedy sketoh, "Ankles" ; the 
Melody Maids are a female quartet ; Galpllger 
and Hamilton sing, and the Musical Rail- 
roaders are also on the program. 

PALACE.— 'The Majesties." 

HOLLIDAY STREET.— "Jolly Maidens." 

GAYETY.— "Ginger Girls." 



BOSTON. 

By LBN LIBBBY. 

KEITH'S (Robert O*. Larsen, mgr. ; agent. 
U. B. O.).— "The Oirlles Gambol," advertised 
for several weeks In advance, and both the 
production and the box office returns Mon- 
day warranted the splurge. The supporting 
bill played better than it looked on paper, 



\W K\\ PROl I) nl- 



I ins son; 1 has t h i ■ most rncoiv-prc.nf r 
U' vtismii m \ <t licit - \ 1 1 1 « ■ , and Miirc nt 

: I < a t < > t t .v I ( 1 1 ! 1 1 n > In mi (1 in ,i ■ i 



c in \ m 



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1 aaUa 1 iul \ / 

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[M.1 t ( 

ad>. 



Waterson, Berlin & Snyder 

STRAND I HKATRF BUII.DIM, 
■17th St. and Broadway, New ^crL 



OHCAGO BOSTON 

S1-83-S5 Randolph St. ;!Zn Ticmont Street 

FRANK (LARK, Chicago N^r. MAX WINS LOW, N. Y Mm 



agent, 

; agent, 

agAt, 
In tea- 
started 

; agent, 

MoGuin- 



maklng one of the best shows In months. 
Dunedln Duo opened in a neat bicycle and 
wire act ; Renee Florlgny, pianist, fair ; 
"Motor Boating," good ; Harry and Eva Puck, 
snappy ; Hufford and Chain, very good 
"Creation," spectacular ; Joe Towle, excel- 
lent ; third episode of "Patrla" closed, hold- 
ing the house well. 

BOSTON (Charles Harris, mgr.; ageut, U. 
B. O). — Vaudeville and pictures. Good. 

BIJOU (Ralph Oilman, mgr.; agent, U. B. 
O.). — Pictures. Oood. 

BOWDOIN (Al Somerbee, mgr.; 
Loew). — Pop and pictures. 

ST. JAMES (Joseph Brennan, mgr. 
Loew).— Pop. Big. 

OLOBE (Frank Meagher, mgr.; 
Loew). — New policy of dally change 
ture film, using only first releases 
Monday night. Looks like a winner. 

ORPHEUM (Victor J. Morris, mgr. 
Loew). — Pop. Big. 

SCOLLAY OLYMPIA (James J. 
ness, mgr.). — Pop. Good. 

GORDON'S OLYMPIA (Frank Hookallo, 
mgr.). — Pop. Excellent. 

PARK (Thomas W. Soreiro, mgr.). — Pic- 
Uiree. Good. 

MAJESTIC (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— Keller- 
mann film Is playing to nearly capacity on 
Its third week at $1 top. 

SHUBERT (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— "Eileen," 
the Herbert- Blossom Irish comic opera, going 
big on its third week, the change in the name 
from "Hearts of Erin" proving shrewd more. 

PLYMOUTH (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— Lest 
week of Grace George, using "Half an Hour" 
and "Dlvorcons" with fair business. Mo- 
rosco's "The Drat" opens Monday for two 

WCt*lC8. 

WILBUR (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— Last wefk 
of Emily Stevens In "The Unchastenfd 
Womfh." Business falling off. "The Blpe 
Paradise" Monday. '< 

PARK SQUARE (Fred E. Wright, mgr.)i— 
Last week of "Canary Cottage." Excellent 
business. "Fair and Warmer" Monday. 

COLONIAL (Charles J. Rich, mgr.).— Sec- 
ond week of "The Cohan Revue" to practltsl 
capacity. 

HOLLIS (Charles J. Rich, mgr.).— "Pier- 
rot, the Prodigal," opened Monday to g< 
house. Julia Aithur booked Feb. 12 In "Se( 
monda." Should do well here because she! 
a Bostonlan. 

TREMONT (John B. SehoeiTel. nigr.)ij- 
"Mlss Springtime" (new company) fouBh 
week and going strong. * 

BOSTON OPERA HOUSE (Lawrence Mc- 
Carty, mgr. ).— "Mother Carey's Chlckene" 
was sought by Mr. McCarty last week but tBo 
project was finally temporarily abandoned fcy 
Mrs. Wlggln's -objection to the use of -»a 
midget In the Juvenile role. McCarty'a hOltto 



■ Mlllltlllll* 



AN EXCLUSIVE NEW 
LINE OF SHIRTS 
AND NECKWEAR 
NOW BEING SHOWN 

Sy. A. Horwitt,* nc 



Men's Furnisher 

Broadway at 49th St. 
New York City 



l& 



VARIETY 



• m _ 



43 



■ "" IT 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS THE OnU Successoi to "Yaaka fL 





HififH 




Come up <\iu\ hear this one. Wr ha\ tunch o( doubles to tit ..n\ situation, 

also a great obligate 'Ins song is a sure-fire bit toi ev< • voi <t. 

SING A HIT—BE A HIT. 

WATERSON, BERLIN & SNYDER 

Strand Theatre Bidg., 47th St. and Broadway, New York 

CHICAGO— 81-83-85 Randolph Sire* t BOSTON ' rremont Stn 

FRANK CLARK, Chicago Managei MAX WINMOW, New York Managei 



Herman Bach 



BROADWAY AND «TH STRUT 

NEW YOSK CITY 

UNDER VARIETY'S OFFICES 



JEWELER 

The Friars 

Tbe Screen Glob 

The Green Room Club 



AMONG OUR ODD AND NOV- 
ELTY JEWELRY ARE BRACE* 
LETS, WATCHES. KNIVES. 
DRESS SETS AND WRIST 
WATCHES OF RARE CHARM 
AND BEAUTY. 

PLANNED TO SUIT THE PER- 
SONALITY AND PURSE OF THE 
BIQ AND SMALL PROFES- 
SIONAL. 

TEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT 
TO THE PROFESSION. 



DANE 



American Society of 
>sers, Authors and Publishers 

There will be a general meeting of 
the members of the above society at 

56 West 45th Street, New York City, Third Floor 
Tuesday, February 6th, 1917, at Eight P. M. 

IMPORTANT BUSINESS!!! 

Relative to the recent decision of the Supreme Court of the United 
States upon the rights of the members of the society. 

• « 

GLEN MAC DONOUGH, Secretary. 



hu been dark for a month and be bad boped 
to make a spectacular production at a $1 top. 

CASTLE SQUARE (John Craig, m«r.).— 
Second week of "Little Women." "Jerry' la 
underlined. 

COPLEY (O. H. Pattee, mgr.)— "Candida" 
this week with fair success. "Milestones" 
next week. The Henry Jewett English Play- 
ers seem to be making a permanent place for 
themselves in thlse intimate type of theatre. 

CASINO (Charlea Waldroa. mgr.).— "Bon 
Ton Girls." Good. 

OAIETT (Charles Batcheller, mgr.). — 
"Marion's Show." Capacity. 

HOWARD (George E. Lothrop, mgr.). — 
"Follies of Pleasure." Big. 



BUFFALO. 



TECK (John Oishei, mgr.).- -House given 
over to the Consistory Minstrels for the mid- 
winter carnival the entire week. Next, "Vary 
Good Eddie." 

MAJESTIC (Chas. Lawrence, mgr.). — "Come 
Back to Erin," very good Irish comedy drama 
playing to cordial bouses of no mean attend- 
ance. Coming, "Broadway After Dark." 



GATETT (Chas. Taylor, mgr.),— Al. Reeves' 
Show, 25th anniversary week. Next, Bam Bid- 
man's. 

GARDEN (Wm. Graham, mgr.).— La* Damy 
and Freddie Gllmore and * 7 Athletlo Girls/' 
record breaking business. 

ACADEMY (Jules Mlcheal, mgr.).— First 
half, "Dream Surprise Party," vary good ; Hall 
and Cliff, good; Lucille Savoy, pleasing; 
Fields and Hanson, hit; Beulah Benton, well 
received. 

STAR (P. C. Cornel, mgr.).— Chauncey 01- 
cott in "The Heart of Paddy Whack," first 
half, heartily welcomed. Last half, new drama, 
"If." Following, "The Lioness." 

SHEA'S (Henry Carr, mgr.).— White and 
Cavanagh, headline; Montgomery and Perry, 
featured ; Jack and Kitty Demaco, open well ; 
Mrs. Gene Hughes and Co., good ; Mae Curtis, 
well applauded; Bert Melrose, pleases; Musi- 
cal Johnstons, clever; Bee Ho Gray and Ada 
Somervllle, close nicely. 

LYRIC (H. B. Franklin, mgr.).— Darling 
Saxapbone Four, headlining cleverly; Lew 
Harris, hit ; Earle and Edwards, do well ; 
Raines and Nelson, good ; Magee A Kerry, 
good ; Carlo Ceasaro, closes strong. 



P. s. 



\ \ on loot* mi* t or -\ i 
"Blui If so, tin n 

to :>tn adv. on the ••» tt 
pa 



OLYMPIC* (Bruce Fowler, mgr.).— "A Trip 
of Pleasure." musical comedy, headline; Four 




9K&. 0U* 



FIFTH AVSNUS IMPORTER AND 
DESIGNER 

Advance 
Models 

in a complete and com- 
prehensive collection of 
the newest and most 
distinctive styles are 
now being displayed 
for the inspection of 
professionals. Clothes 
that mirk the wearer 
with the individuality 
of style and g^od taste 
are always to be seen 
at this establishment. 
Mile. Claire suggests 
an early visit 

Special Rates 
to Professionals. 

130 West 45th Street 
New York Gty 

Phone Bryant SSS1 



Valdos, doing nicely ; Ray-Drels-Fay Trio, 
clever ; George Davis, does well ; Matilda Trio, 
good. 



LILLIAN 



CLAUDIUS and SCARLET 



Desire to announce that while in their 
nfth s month at the Ziegfeld "Midnight 
Frolic" they have been re-engaged by- 
Flo. Ziegfeld, Jr., for 20 additional 
weeks, which will keep them busy into July. 



AMERICAN COMEDY FOUR 



Featured at Keith's Royal this week (Jan. 29) and registered one of the laughing hits of the bill. 

JOE DARCEY-Baritone Management, ROSE & CUR t IS Stanley dale-i* Tenor 

BOOKED SOLID U. B. O. 



JACK STURGES— 2nd Tenor 



WM. PEEL— Basso 



44 



VARIETY 



— - 



THAT WILD WEhPIN' HIT 



"Homesickness 



Blues" 



The greatest instrumental number of the 
year. The melody you are air asking 
about with a lyric that hts like a glove. 
SING A HIT— BE A HIT. 





■ ■■ rtif you iooKing ici a ineioay song nil. 
1 ■ Wa If so, turn to our adv. on the next page. 


•- 


liflHfluill 




InT^rni! 


er 


STRAND THEATRK BUILDING 
47th St. and Broadway, New York 

CHICAGO BOSTON 
81-83-85 Randolph St. 2.!0 Fremont Street 
FRANK CLARK. Chicago Mgr.- MAX WINSLOW, N. Y. Mgr. 



LOS ANGELES. 
Br •wr prick. 

Chester Clapp declines the honor of 



"scenario editor." He says he's plain "scenario 
writer." 




AgloW 
With All 
The Snap 



For the stage, fash- 
ioned from Strick- 
land originals that 
breathe an ideal cor- 
rectness and "right" 
for stage wear — such 
are " Strickland " 
gowns which have 
been selected for our 
professional custom- 
ers. 



36 W. Randolph Street 

Phone Randolph 1720 
Central 6581 

Chicago, 111. 



William Wetghtman, Frank Lowrjr and 
Charlie Aphln have returned from Ban Fran- 
cisco, haying completed arrangements to re- 
open the Burbank with musical stock. 

Milton Lowen, of the Century. Is now doing 
pltcure duty, learning the business, he says, 
from the ground up. 

Clarence Drown, Orpheum manager, la out 
again after a hrlef Indisposition. 



Eddie Leonard didn't appear on the night 
hill at the Orpheum Monday last week. The 
management said the actor was left off to 
make room for his wife, Mabel Russell, who 
was not billed for the week, having shown the 
week previous, but back-stage rumors have It 
that Mr. Leonard refused to appear when 



What Shall I Do 
With That Spot? 




Everything EAq/ As Midu- 
in the %3\9^0 facturers 

House) n -■, , . We Sell to 

Reduced OFr You Direct 

FURS OF QUALITY 



Muffs 




Scarfs 


$45.00 


KOLINSKY 


$55.00 


$25.00 


TAUPE FOX 


$25.00 


$20.00 


BEAVER 


$20.00 


$35.00 


ERMINE 


$25.00 


$55.00 


FISHER 


$50.00 


$25.00 


MOLE 


$25.00 


$25.00 


WHITE FOX 


$30.00 


$12.00 


BLUE WOLF 


$12.00 


$45.00 


CROSS FOX 


$40.00 


$10.00 


NUTRIA 


$9.00 


$12.00 


RACCOON 


$14.00 


$12.50 


HUDSON SEAL 


$12.50 


$25.00 


SKUNK 


$20.00 


$10.00 


BLACK SKUNK 


$10.00 


$20.00 


TAUPE WOLF 


$20.00 



A. Ratkowsky 

28-34 W. 34th Street 



placed last on the program. He went on Tues- 
day, however, and occupied a middle position. 

Michael Corner Is wrlUng a musical comedy. 

Walter Hearn, the Mason's publicity man, 
outdone himself In landing layouts In the 
local papers for "Experience." Manager Rich- 
ards idmltted before his departure that this 
city will give him a bigger showing than any 
place since the tour of the play began. 

Clark Irvine has. painted his new car with 
the word "Screamer." That's loyalty to a jBlm • 
club for you. 

J. W. Anderson Is back managing dune's 
Broadway. 



Harold Melville and sister are soon to make 
a tour of the Pantages circuit 

Mark Ellis Is rehearsing a new act for big- 
time vaudeville. 



NEW ORLEANS. 

By O. M. SAMUBU 

ORPHEUM (Charles E. Bray, southern 
representative). — Ordinary bill. Kitaro Bros., 
opening, did nicely. Eddie Dowllng, comedian, 
found little response. Seven Honey Boys were 
liked. Duffy and Lorens furnish class of 
program. Evan Burrows Fontaine disclosed 






CLEANSER AND DYER 

Gowns cleaned or dyed in 24 hours. 
45TH STREET AND BROADWAY 



A cleaning fluid for eradicating 
stains of any nature on gowns* 
wraps, gloves, slippers snd rib- 
bons may be had at this estab- 
lishment in three sires— IS, 2S 
and SS-cent nettles. 

Tel. Bryant Met 



Washington Detective Bureau, 



Inc. 



Licensed and Bonded 



Detective Work In All Its Branches 

John T. Vlckery, President Alexander Cohen, Secretary 

OFFICE OPEN ALL NIGHT 

Genera! Office: .441 to 1449 Broadway, New York City 



CHICAGO Office: 
Webster Building 

Telephone-Harrison S2S4 



Telephones-Bryant 1142-1143 

NIAGARA FALLS Office: 
Gluck Building 

Telephone Niagara 1447 




■i * i ....... 



Mme. Kahn's success 
is due largely to the 
fact that her display 
of Gowns, Suits and 
Wraps consists of 
such models that are 
not seen elsewhere. 
Her creations are 
original and distinc- 
tive in every sense of 
the word. 

Professionals whose 
success depends on 
originality in dress, 
should consult Mme. 
Kahn at once. 

A visit will convince you. 




Creator of Gowns 

One forty eight Weet Forty-fourth St. 
Near Broadway, New York City. 
Four doors west of the Lamb's Club. 



pretentious sets. Ward Bros, were peeved be- 
cause the audience did not enthuse over their 
Jokes. Nederfold provided good closing turn. 
TULANB (T. C. Campbell, mgr.).— "Ex- 
perience." 

DAUPHINB (Arthur B. Leopold, mgr.).— 
Sarah Bernhardt. 

CRESCENT (T. C Campbell, mgr.) .— "If utt 
and Jeff's Wedding." 

LYRIC (Lew Rose, mgr.).— Stock burlesque. 

LAFAYETTE (Charles Mails, mgr.).— Vau- 
deville. 

ALAMO (Will Oueringer, mgr.). — Jlmmle 
Brown's Revue. 



Mrs. B. F. Brennan and son left for Phila- 
delphia Sunday. Mrs. Brennan is paying a 
visit to her mother Mrs. Brennsn's husband 
Is now booking the acta at the Lafayette. 

William F. Connor, under whose personal 
direction Sarah Bernhardt la appearing, trav- 
els several days In advance of the star. Fran- 
cis X. Hope Is manager with the company. 
Bernhardt excepted, iarewell tours do not al- 
ways fare well. 

Ruth Meeker and Ray McNeill are late 

additions to Jlmmle Brown's Revue. Guy Mc- 

Cdvmlck and Cliff Wlnehlll remain principal 
comedians with the revuette. 



Bracale Opera Co. appears at the French 
opera house In March. 



The local moral crusaders have not at- 
tacked the theatres as yet. Nothing quite so 
funny as a reform wave save the reformer 
himself, and the holier-than-thou fellow Is 
even more pestiferous than the smarter-than- 
you lad and the greater-than-hlm actor. 
Thinking people long ago found out that 
education was the only lasting reform. 

Eltlnge Is due at the Tulane next week. The 
Crescent will offer "Peg." Mary Scudder, star 
of "Peg.' '}% rpp*ari!iff on tfc» ft age for -the 
ftitrt tlmw. 9be formerly pngaged In amateur 
theatrical In Vlckaburg, Miss., her home. 

"Flora Bella" is an early booking at the 
Tulane. 



D inter Orachen Five la appearing at the 
Rathskeller. 



VARIETY 



y 









Wants, Engagements, Service and Instruction 

$1 for 25 words — 3 cents each word over. 

This special department begins in this issue of VARIETY. It is started as 
an opportunity to reasonably announce wants, of any nature, players wanted for 
any act or role or players who wish to make known they are at liberty, for service 
of any kind to be rendered either in or outside the theatrical profession and for those 
who might wish to furnish instruction of some kind. 

Also a 

SALE and EXCHANGE 






department, with the same rates, $1 for 25 words — 3 cents each word over. In this 
may be advertised anything for sale or exchange and is promoted principally with 
a view of having a forum for show people where they may make known what they 
wish in the line of theatrical props, scenery or other things and what they have on 
hand to sell. 



Zelta Sisters are an added attraction with 
The Cave Dwellers" at the Qrunewald. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).— Bill this 
week made to order for a good big laughing 
act. There was all the class and color that 
could be asked for In a high grade vaude- 
ville show, but It needed just that one big 
hurrah comedy hit to top it off. Bonita and 
Lew Hearn, who had the next to closing spot, 
came very near turning the trick and with 
some new material might have walked away 
with a hit worth bragglcg about, but almost 
everyone who goes to the theatre with any 
degree of regularity has seen that old table 
scene done to death, and while this couple 
get a lot out of It through the handling, they 
should toss It Into the discard for something 
fresh. Miss Bonita, as usual makes a stun- 
ning appearance, and Hearn, with his pipy 
voice, is a clever foil for her, and under the 
circumstances they did very well. Von Hamp- 
ton and Surlner also had an opportunity to 
put over a big hit in the early half of the 
bill, but missed It because their material Is 
not just there. At times they hit the right 
spot and have some real good laugh winners, 
but the "nut" stuff has been pretty well 
worked out, and it must be of the brightest 
sort to get over big these days. The boys, 
however, finished strong and left those In 



front in good humor. Fay Templeton was 
the headliner and the former musical comedy 
star was given a warm reception. She seemed 
to sing better than ever and was a genuine 
applause riot when se sang "So Long Mary." 
Miss Templeton finished in a blackface num- 
ber, which gave Jimmy Clarke a chance to 
finger some good rag time at the piano. The 
cork number went well, but Miss Templeton 
should not stop hunting for something better 
to close with, if she intends to remain long 
In vaudeville. Helene Lackaye presented one 
of the Washington Square Players' successes 
called "Overtones," assisted by three other 
women. It Is a story of dual personalities, 
two of the women, clothed In shadowy gar- 
ments, Impersonating the inner souls of the 
two principals who carry the dialog. It'B 
rather a surprising theme and calls for the 
closest kind of attention to thoroughly under- 
stand It and get the full meaning. The 
characters are cleaaly Interpreted and the 
playlet was very well received. It's a sketch 
for the higher class audience and a novelty 
In vaudeville which will be appreciated. Down 
in the closing position Mile. Blanca and her 
dancers registered an unmistakable hit. It is 
no easy thing for any newcomer to score 
with this classical stuff, after all we have had 
of that In vaudeville, but this little lady just 
made herself recognized. Not only is the 
dancing of the trio, particularly that of Mile. 
Blanca, well executed, but the act is to bo 
praised for Its pretty stage setting and light- 



ing and scenic effects. Wright and Dietrich 
have a new singing act that rises well above 
the last one they offered here. The use of 
the piano and the ukelele adds variety to the 
offering and the couple have been successful 
in choosing musical numbers which they can 
get the most out of. They have cut a lot of 
the "spooning'' they did on the bench, but 
Mr. Wright Beems to have at least one kiss 
during the act, taking one during the bows. 
"Jasper," the dog, was just as big as on his 
laBt visit, though Dixie Taylor might vary 
the routine of tricks used. He does in a 
way, by inviting the audience to tell the dog 
what to do, but the other work could stand 
revision. A rather unusual and pretty sing- 
ing turn is that of Valmont and Reynen. 
They havo arranged their pleasing singing 
numbers In a regular order, and have good 
voices. The "Patria" picture is getting to be 
a laugh. The third episode, called "Winged 
Millions," is Bo thoroughly inconsistent It 
gets very close to being a 10-20-30 thriller 
without any of the class that should go with 
a feature film of this sort. It Is Interesting 
the Keith patrons, however, and holds them 
In at the close of the show. 

ALLEGHANEY (Joseph Cohen, mgr.).— 
The mixed program of feature films and vau- 
deville Is getting good returns at this theatre 
since the change. This week Theda Bara in 
"The Darlling of Paris" is the big screen 
number, with the following vaudeville bill : 
"Wanted, a Wife," a tabloid musical comedy 



with a company of 12 ; Karlln, White and Co., 
Lucllle's CockatooB, Parlllo and Frablto, 
Coxey's Army. 

BROADWAY (Joseph Cohen, mgr.).— "One 
Touch of Sin," film feature, carries the head- 
line position, with the* following vaudeville 
bill : "Hoosier Girl," one of the many tab- 
loid musical comedies playing the "pop" 
houses regularly; Julian Rose, Tom Brown's 
Minstrels, a company of 12, Hallen and 
Hunter, Mabel Fonda Troupe. 

COLONIAL (H. A. Smith, mgr.).— Wanda, 
trained seal, is featured as the big novelty 
of the bill. Other acts are Columbia and Vic- 
tor, William DeHollis and Co., in "The Ad- 
miral's Return," Little Lord Roberts, Andrew 
Kelly, In a monolog, and Virginia Pearson In 
the film feature, "The Bitter Truth." 

NIXON'S GRAND OPERA HOUSE (W. D. 
Wegofarth, mgr.). — Lillian Kingsbury in a 
sketch called "The Coward" headlines. Others 
on the bill : Rayno's Bulldogs, Regal and 
Bender, Fields Sisters, Arthur Rlgby and 
Booth and Loander. 

NIXON (F. O. Nixon-Nirdllnger, mgr.).— 
Olga Mlschka and her Russian dancers are 
featured. Others on the bill are Lillian 
Stelle and Chums, Maunalo Sextet of Haw- 
aiian!, Baby Helen, Thomas Trio and the 
film feature, Gladys Coburn in "The Prlmltfve 
Call." 

KEYSTONE (M. W. Tuylor, mgr.).-- 
" Mother Goose" with J. C. Mack and Co. is 
the headliner. Others : Archie and Gertie 



THIS SONG WAS A HIT BEFORE IT WAS PUBLISHED 






iS 



Ju*t a brand new idea that you will all be sini^m?; before lon^, so why not 
bi' oni' of the first to smj» it. \t's, we have double versions and they ft fMeat 
SING A HIT---BK A HIT. 

WATERSON, BERLIN & SNYDER 

Strand Theatre Bldjy.. 47th St. and. Brnadwav. Nrw Y.irrU 




P. S. 



( I IICA(,() Sl-M-Sr. Randolph Street 

I RANK l LARK, C }<;<.»•<<> :\l,m,.-i 



BOSTON - 2'M I i , m.ipt Stre. t 

MAX \\ INSI.OW. N\ ^ YmU Mana-e» 



Art' you looking for <\ bal- 
lad hit ? If ko, turn to our 
adv. on the next pa^e. 



46 



VARIETY 




If you are looking for real attention and 
hit songs try our New York, Chicago and 
Boston offices. 



STRAND THEA1 RE BUM DING 

17th St. and Broadway, V \ Yor!< 

CHICAGO BOSTON 

81-83-85 Randolph St. 220 Tremont Street 

FRANK CLARK. Chicago Mgr. MAX W1NSLOW, N. Y. Mgr 



Palls, Charles Rellly and "The Hidden 
Hand/' episode of "The Shielding Shadow." 
WILLIAM PENN (O. W. Metzel, mgr.)— A 
spectacular comedy called "Prom Coney Island 
to the North Pole" headlines for the first half. 
Others : Jolly, Wild and Prance, Pox and In- 

Sam, the Crisps and the photoplay, "The 
tUe Tank." Second half: "The Maids of 
Phllty" headlines the vaudeville hill and 
Frank Kenan In "The Bride of Hate" Is the 
film feature. 
CROSS KEYS (Sabloekey A MoQurk).— Abe 



Pelnberg and Co. in "The Girls and the 
Baron" headlines first half. Others: Porce 
and Williams, Joe Moore, Tyler and Crollus, 
Monkey Hippodrome. Second half: "An In- 
nocent Bystander" headlines. Others: Three 
Romanos, Freeborn and Mascott, Wlldlsh and 
Richards, Neil McKinley and Metsetti Family. 
GLOBE (Sabloskey A McGurk). — Singers 
Midgets, Bessie LeCount, Prank Gabby and 
Co., Ratho's Bogs, Miss Billy Seaton, Law- 
rence and Edwards, Elite Trio, Standard 
Bros., pictures. 



WIGS 



DIRECT FROM THE 
MANUFACTURER 



Made to your own measurements, of natural human hair — either 
wavy or crimpy. Can be combed and dressed, same as your own 
hair. The profession prefer my wigs because they can also be 
worn for street wear. 

MnnAfyArt ftJni*is»A I always have on hand 400 

managers iiouce. to 500 wig8 and can ^1 

emergency orders in standard colors and sizes the same day 
order is received. 

WHITE OR WIRE FOR FREE CATALOG 

ALEX MASKS, 704 Broadway, New York 




The FAMOUS KIMIWA TROUPE 

THE ONLY ACT OF ITS KIND 
TO RECEIVE A BLANKET CONTRACT FROM 

MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 

Represents by IRVINE M. COOPER 



SEATTLE. 

By WALBURT. 
METROPOLITAN.— 28-31, "The Lilac Dom- 
ino," to good business. 

MOORE.— Dark. 

LYRIC. — Burlesque and vaudeville. 

OAK (Geo. B. Pantagss, mgr.). — The Monte 
Carter mislcal comedy company in "The 
Rollicking Girls." Next week: The Seaside 
Flirts. 

ORPHEUM (Dean Worley, mgr.; agent. 
Wilkes Bros.).— "Fifty Miles from Boston, 
current week. Wm. C. Walsh, Gladys Eyman, 
Florence Spencer, furnish the major part of 
the comedy. Gerlad Griffin and Miss Eyman 
principal vocalists. Next: "The Yankee 
Prinoe." 

COLONIAL (W. A. 8mythe, mgr.).— Par- 
sons musical comedy and photoplays. 

STRAND (W. A. Smythe, mgr.).— Blake's 
Hawalians and pictures. Business satis- 
factory. 

GRAND.— Dark since fire. Shows will be 
shunted to the Tivoll. 

PANT AGES (Edward Milne, mgr.; agent, 
Alex Pantages). — Bob Pitzsimmons and son, 
and musical tab with 14 people, "Mr. Chaser," 
joint headllners. Fitzsimmon's turn made a 
big hit with both sexes. He does a monolog 
and then boxes three fast rounds with his 
son. George Leonard and the Cheslelgh Girls 
are featured in "Mr. Chaser." Chong and 
Moey, Chinese, next in popularity, clever 
team. Sol and Leslie Burns really humorous 
skit ; Anthony £ Mack, good ; Helen Holmes 
serial and Maraccl orchestra complete bill. 
Capaoitl business all week. 



ALHAMBRA (Carl Reiter, mgr.; agent, 
Orpheum Circuit). — Geo. NaRh in "The Un- 
expected," powerful playlet, and Mme Chil- 
son-Ohrmann, headline. Foster ball, fine 




MAT 

* UNIOU 



ROYALL 



UNIQUE MUSICAL NOVELTY 



ALBOLENE 

/* an •xemlUnt toilmt articU 
for general par poem* 

We are told by the ttan of the 
stage that — "In removing all triads 
of theatrical make-up there Is 
nothing to compare with it." 



Albokneisputup in i sad a cesses tubes 
to fit tht make-up boa : also in H tad a S> 
cans. It may be had of most lirnggiiw sad 
dealer* in make-up. SmmpUfrefn rtfum t. 

McKESSON A ROBBINS 

Sj 4attnfa^*ifp «g Chemists 
91 Fulton Street NowYeck, 



THE "CIRCUIT OF MUSICAL FOLLIES," Inc. 



14*2 Broadway, New York, Suite 714, 715, 71s 



ED W. F. RUSH, General Manager 



Phone Bryant 12t-«CO-iM4 



Playing 20 Big Shows 
with New Ideas 



WANTED 

Good Producers With First Class Clean Shows 
HAVE ROOM FOR A FEW GOOD THEATERS IN BIG CITIES 



Playing 20 Big Cities 
Twice Daily 



Address all communications to EDW. F. RUSH, 1482 Broadway, New York 



OFFICERS: Pre»ldent, EDW. F. RUSH; Vice-Pres., HARRY N. STEINFELD; Treasurer, B. F. KAHN; Secretary, SAMSON FRIEPLANDER; THOS. J. G1LLEN, Real Estate Dept. 






REDDINGTON 



AND 



GRANT 



Moved from Opening, to NUMBER FOUR at Prospect, Brooklyn, Last Week 






THIS WEEK (Jan. 29) ROYAL, NEW YORK 



Direction, CHAS. BORNHAUPT 



VARIETY 



THREE BRAND NEW SMASHING SONG HITS 



-, m - 



i - .,*.•> 



'(ALL COME ROLLING HOME JlGAW) 

By LESLIE and GOTTLER 






• Here it * ballad that will positively set your audience on fire with enthusiasm. It can stand up in any old spot in your specialty. 

AN IRISH COMEDY NUMBER WITH AN IRRESISTIBLE SWING 



Living 



By GERBER and GOTTLER 
A lyric that carries a laugh in every line and one of those rollicking Irish melodies that never fail. 



A somewhat different Hawaiian song 



"When Those Sweet Hawaiian Babies Roll Their Eyes" 



KALMAR, PUCK 

MACK STARK, General Manager 



By LESLIE and RUBY 
This is a sure cinch. Don't fail to look it over. 



and ABRAHAMS, CONSOLIDATED 

1570 Broadway MAURICE ABRAHAMS, Professional Manager 



NOTICE FOR 
EUROPE 

Flayers la Europe desiring to advartiss 
la VARIETY, and within* to taka advan- 
tage of tha Prapald Rataa allowod, may 
aacura tha mum, If at tha time of m a iling 
Advertising copy dlract to VARIETY, Nsw 
York, tha amount la paymant for It la 
places! la VARIETY'S crodlt at tha 

PALL MALL DEPOSIT AND FORWARD- 
ING CO. 
Carlton St* Ragaat St* S. W., London 

For uniformity In exchange tha Pall 
Mall Co. will accapt dopoalta for VARIETY 
at four shilling a, two panca, on tha dollar. 

Through thia manner of transmission 
all dangar of loaa to tha player la averted; 
VARIETY assumes full risk and acknowl- 
edges the Pall Mail Co/a receipts as Its 
own receipts for all money placed with 
tha Pall Mall to VARIETY'S credit. 



character study. Faber Girls, favorites. 
Howard's Animals delight. Harry L. Mason, 
good. Mijares, good. 

PALACE HIP (Joseph Muller, mgr. ; agent, 
W. V. M. A. : Ackerman ft Harris. — Pepple 
and Greenwald's "Juvenile Six" headline, ex- 
cellent singing and dancing. Maggie Le Ca- 
lires, big. May & Kilduff, one of the best 
comedy acta in vaudeville. "The Politician," 
humorous sketch. George and Martha, skilled 
banjoists. Hicks and Hart, classy throwing 
turn. Thursday's show is headed by George 
Clancy & Co. KernvlUe Family, Hal Hart, 
Hilda, Day ft West, Circle Comedy Four. 



. Woman's Smart Footwear 

For Street, Stage and Evening Wear 

1560 Broadway £.° ' P 3S , T ££; 

Mail Orders Promptly Filled 



WALTER G. BRETZFIELD CO., Ioc. 

FOOTLITE BRAND 

TIGHTS, UNION SUITS, 5YMMETRICALS AND 
THEATRICAL SUPPLIES, 




1367-1369 Bmdwiy, cor. 37A Ureal. Nnr Ynt C*y 



flMl 



TIVOLI (George Tool. mgr. ; agent, Eugene 
Levy). — Temporary borne of vaudeville before 
seen at the Grand. Fire at that theatre Sat- 
urday necessitated the change. Scheduled to 
open Sunday with five acta of Flaher vaude- 
ville. 

LIBERTY. — Clemmer, Rex, Coliseum, Mis- 
sion, Class A. Madison, Majestic. Picture* to 
good patronage. 

El. Cooper has sold his Interest in the Alta 
theatre at Pendleton, Ore., to his partner, 
John Greulich, and leased the Temple, same 
city. The Temple will utilise the Hippodrome 
vaudeville while the Alta will continue to 
use the Fisher attractiona. 



past seven years, left for the east, but was 
called back by wire on account of tha bra at 
the Grand. 



B. Clarke Walker, Spokane manager for 
Pantagee for the past several years, was here 
nearly nil week conferring with Manager 
Pentagon relative to things theatrical on the 
Paclflo coast. 



Alexander Pantages has Incorporated the 
Pantages Theatre Co. of Minneapolis under the 
laws of Washington. 

Eugene Levy, manager of the Grand for the 



Frank Kelly will leave soon with a mualoal 
comedy show for a trip to Alaaka points. He 
Is negotiating with the Gross people, who have 
theatres In Junesu, Ketobikan, Douglas and 
several other principal cities of the far North. 

Tom Pitt is the new director of the Wilkes' 
Players In Vsncouver st the Empress. 

Jane Urban has gone to her home In Cali- 
fornia after completing ,.n engagement of two 
seasons with the American stock company at 
the American, Spokane. 



FRANK TERRY CAN GIVE YOU SUCCESS 




■Good material means "SUCCESS," and Frank 
Terry can write any kind of material you may re- 
quire. Try him. These people have: 

MIh Alice Lloyd. Marie Lloyd, Vesta Tiller. Euth Roy*. 
Alma Gray. Lillian Doherty. Maria Hart. Flo and Ollle 
W altera. Annie Kent. Queenle Dunedla. Messrs. Goldlnt and 
Keating. Barrows and Brown. Sabbott and Wright. Raymond 
and Cawly. McCormaek and Shannon. Kanunerer and How- 
land. Orren and Drew, Dave Thursby. Tom Almond, Harry 

f\lvi?.n. . _H»ndr f b»W,. .Ofo,. .. A'ljw^ Meredllh * n $ B '9° f * r ' 



r.u4»jll VuKvo. Cn*\ 
rtc eic 



VCllWe 'fctrd, Ooorgo llobij. '-Tlftle PcK.' 



Net* sew address and teltshsae. 



FRANK TFRRY T»« Elmsferd, 3st West efth St 
r I*/**"! I* 1 A^-IVIX A 9 N#w York City, Phone Bryant 772 



CALL, WRITE. OR PHONE. TERMS TO SUIT. 



BE WISE and GET NEXT 

to our SAMPLE SALE 

of FURS 

now taking place at OUR SHOW 
ROOMS. This is a rare oppor- 
tunity to buy some very MODISH 
SETS and COATS at a big sacri- 
fice. You cannot afford to let this 
chance slip by. It will more than 
pay you to get your NEXT SEA- 
SON'S FURS NOW. Just ring us 
up or drop a card for an appoint- 
ment. 

Rosenberg Bros* 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
"THE R. B. FUR SYSTEM FURS'* 

13-15 W. 24th St 
Tel. Frgt. 9692 

Special Diacount to Professionals 



The Del Lawrence company, now at tha 
Avenue, Vancouver, B. C, Just completed a 
twenty week's engagement In Ban Francisco 
at the Wigwam. 

Howard Clarke, well known In this section, 
was taken to police headquarters Monday 
charged with serving liquor to an agent of the 
Seattle "dry squad." 

Phoebe Hunt and Norman Hackett, leading 
at the local Orpheum theatre for the past seo- 
son. have been transferred to Wilkes' Van- 
couver house, the Empress. 

Dob Fitzslmmonn announces he will forsake 
the footlights after completing his present 
tour of the Pantages circuit, and Join his wife 
(Julia (ftfford) In evangelistic work. His 
contract has about 14 weeks yet to complete* 



CLUB AGENTS 

. Vf JV Istiwi. •&.% fw sr Inc* .'. . Cut bur tb* 
home Euarda. Book 

JOHNNY REILLY 

HOOF ROLLER and COMEDY JUGGLER 

242 W. 43rd St.. New York City. Phase. Brysst 2S4t 

Make s note of this address. 



• 






VARIETY 



I 



v. •■»»•.* %.* * . , . > - ». -» .. ■>■ ,. . 'ft p 



NO! 



■ 






»*>#». 



CLAYTON 



RANK 



AND 



LENNIE 



it 



E BLJ 



?■ 



16 minutes of clean, solid laughter 



There's something about them you'll like, 
A smart snappy turn, for smart people. 



KIIN/I 




ND 




IM 





Next Week (Feb. 5) Alhambra, New York 



EDWARD S. KELLER, Palace Theatre Building, New York 




CAMILLE 
PERSONI 

"The Butterfly Girl" 
of Vaudeville 



"li rains and Ability Plus a Monvclc" 

Mr. PELHAM LYNTON 

w/f7i Mrs. Langtry (Lady de Bathe* on her OpheumTour 



BARDELL 



Ralph Cloninger hai recovered from bis re- 
cent operation for appendicitis and will rejoin 
the cast of the American Players at the Amer- 
ican theatre, Spokane, Feb. 4, In "Broadway 
Jones." 



Juggler Si 



"A Little Dlffi 



FRANK WHITTIER & 

Presenting 

"The Bank Roll" 

This Week (Jan. 29)— Loew's American 
Direction. WESLEY OFFICE. 



Joe St. Peter, manager of the Rose, Ever- 
ett, was a visitor her Monday and Tuesday. 



The team ow Downs ft Willis Is of the vau- 
deville route sheet of the Fisher circuit this 
week on account of a badly sprained ankle 
one of the boys is suffering with.' 



"The Whit.- City," tit Madison Park, on 
the shores of K-ike Washington, may become 
the homo of n picture studio soon. A dcnl is 
ponding with the city council for the purchase 
of the property. A syndicate of local and 
Eastern capitalists are dickering for the site. 



A trip covering Spokane, Walla Walla, 
North Yuklma, Pendleton, Portland, Astoria. 
Aberdeen, Olympla, Tacoma, Everett and 
Belllngham by 'a representative of VaTuety, 
found theatrical conditions on the coast very 
much improved over last season. Vaudeville 
and picture house managers all claim that 
business is 100 per cent, better than last year 
and a number of new bouses too have been 



Direction, 




JOSEPH TOWLE 



: • • 



ED SOLID, U. B. O. 
By LEO FITZGERALD 

THE CLEANEST TOWLE IN VAUDEVILLE 



added to the routings of the Fisher and Ack- 
erman A Harris circuits. The New Kel He- 
Burns circuit will be In operation In this 
territory soon, with their three-act bills. 



Battalion Chief Frank O. Gllham of the 
Seattle Fire Department, was killed, and 
seven members of the department severaly In- 
jured Saturday morning, when the Grand the- 
atre, on Cherry street, was gutted by fire. The 
walls and the stage remain standing. The 
building originally cost about $65,000. In- 
surance of $25,000 on the building and $2,500 
on the contents was carried. 

Seventeen performers on the bill recovered 
most of their wardrobe. Scenic Artist Ed. 
Leach has a studio in the building. Much of 
the scenery for the new Pantages theatre In 
Vancouver was stored here ; other sets were 
being painted at the time. 

The Grand was the oldest theatre In the 
city, being built In 1000 by John Cort. The 
Ferris Hartman Co. formally opened the 
house October 8 of that year In "Ship Ahoy." 
Until the Moore was erected, in 1007, the 
Grand was the home of all of the first-class 
attractions coming here. Mansfield, Ward. 
Sothern. Nordlca, Mojeska, James, Mrs. Pat 
Campbell, Nat Goodwin and other noted stars 
have been seen here. 

Eugene Levy, present lessee, secured the 
house In 1007, and has been running It as a 
combination theatre since that time. The Ed- 
ward J. Fisher Agency supplies the vaude- 
ville acts. Levy announces that a new the- 
atre will be built on the site at an early 
date. In the meantime the shows are shifted 
to the Tivoll on First avenue. 

The Grand was considered a "fire trap" by 
the local Are department for a number of 
years. Much litigation has resulted over this 
matter. The recent fire has caused the city 
council to draft a new and somewhat drastic 
measure covering the inspection and enforce- 
ment of the Are ordinances. 



Dan McCoy, manager of the Tabor Grand, 
Denver, was a Seattle visitor first of the 
week, conferring with Alex. Pantages. 

George Weiss, German comedian at the Oak, 
celebrated his 31st birthday last Saturday. 
He received 31 presents from members of the 
Monte Carter Co. 



The Weir theatre, Aberdeen, Is now using 
vaudeville acts supplied by the Hippodrome 
Circuit. 



E. D. Tate Is the new manager of the Coli- 
seum. C. S. Jensen, former manager, goes to 
Butte to hold the managerial reins over the 
new Rialto theatre in that city. 



George Relsner, theatrical magnate of Ray- 
mond and South Bend, spent Tuesday and 
Wednesday here. Ed. Walters, his right hand 
man (or rather boy), acorn pan led him. 

Managers of vaudeville, picture and combi- 
nation houses are lining up for an alliance 
for a Pacific Coast Association. The Wash- 
ington State Theatre Managers' Association 
was organised over a year ago. Montana 
managers are pretty well organized with Phil 
Levy of the Ansonla Amusement Co., Butte, st 
the helm. Idaho managers are preparing to 
enter the fold, Herman Brown, of the Majes- 
tic, Boise, sending out a call for organisation. 
Utah managers will have formed an alliance 
by the time this Is published. California has 
an organization that has already accomplished 
much. Oregon managers have at last awoke 
to the fact that they must organize for self- 
protection. A meeting will probably be held 
in Portland early next month. 



The Columbia. Ren ton, Is again using vau- 
deville. The Fisher Agency books the house. 

Rose Frazer, formerly of La Verne, Grimm 
and La Verne, is now doing a single. 



The Eaton Boys will hereafter be knows as 
Link and Leslie. 



The Musical Shlrleys have joined the Pan- 
tages road show, filling the spot made vacant 
by the withdraw! of Hip Raymond, who was 
Injured by a fall while doing his act. 

Billy Malcom, a veteran actot well known 
in tho- west and ono of the ablest members of 
the Elk's lodge. Is now assistant stage man- 
ager for Monte Carter at the Oak theatre. 

Mrs. Geo. Hood, wife of the manager of the 
Moore theatre, Is convalescing at the Swedish 
hospital. She underwent an operation there 
a fortnight ago. 



ST. PAUL 

By O. J. BSHHAJf. 

ORPHEUM.— The attractions booked for St. 
Paul this week, the week of the Outdoor 
Sports Carnival of St. Paul, are everything a 
theatregoer could desire. The Orpheum has 
Jack Wyatt and his Scotch lads and las- 
sies, very pleasing; Ltnne's Classic Dancers, 
well liked ; Whiting and Burt, fine ; Embs ft 
Alton, pleasing; Mr. and Mrsfl Gordon Wilde, 
entertaining. 

NEW PALACE.-^Chas Mack and Co., Lew 
Hoffman, Van Perre and Van Perre, Colman 
Goetz and Co., Casting Campbells, pictures. 

HIPPODROME. — Stanley's Clever Kids, 
pleasing ; Kathleen Klawah-Wah-Ya, Indian 
harpist, good ; Kaney, Mason and School, good; 
The Four Lees, please ; pictures. 

METROPOLITAN.— "Blue Paradise," very 
pleasing and well liked. Week 5, "Chin Chin." 

SHU BERT.— The Shubert Stock In "The 
High Cost of Loving." Next lfeek, "The Lie." 

STAR. — The Star Is putting over a new one 
this week with a midnight show every night 
during the St. Paul Outdoor Sports Carnival, 
and so far the "American Burlesquers" have 
been playing to full houses. 



PAMAHASIKA 



PETS 



VARIETY 



4* 




JOHN T. DOYLE wi CO. 



NOW TOURING IN 



"The Danger Line"— A Genuine Novelty 

This Wnk (Jan. »)— PtatafM, Su Diego, CaL 
Nut Wwk (Feb. 5)-Pantn#ss, Salt Lake City 





THE ORIGINAL IDEA 




KOKOMAYNIA CLUB 






Ws opened In CntoafO this 

WttMm 






New Member*— Al K. Hall, 






Otto Spits. Sennits and Both. 






Manny Kay Is in town tola 
week. Martha Hlckejr you aura 






got to be a swell girl, so Jules 






says Benny Howard please 






drop us a line. Honorable line- 






up of our act, Harry Meyers 


^aW V^ " "** 




(very Important). Jules Hummel 






(Important). Jack Hoffman 






i foreman). Jerome Tobln and 






Ben Burks (ad lib). 


™ww^ 








TOM 
McKAY'S 
SCOTCH 
REVUE 




"The McKays" did not 



work very steady last sea- 



son. You'll see by this pic- 



ture we're proud of the 



NOTE.— My Kilt will be ready naxt week. Edits. .Address VARIETY. New York. 



A MUSICAL ACT OF DISTINCTIVE MERIT 



JACK L-EV/Y 

- - FOUR SYMPHONY SISTERS 

uaw *'A Study in Melody " address variety, new york. 



KATHARINE DANA'S 

"FISHERS FOLK" 

UNITED TIME 



GEO. W. CARRIE 

BARBIER, THATCHER and CO. 



Booked Solid 



In "THE WAY OUT" 

Direction, ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



H.rry holmes and LeVere fi.™ 

PRESENTING THBHI COiiEDY IKIT - 
By TOMMY OKAY 

Booked Solid. Oration, ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 




ELIZABETH SHIRLEY 



WHh 



RAYMOND BOND in "REMNANTS" 

Orpkmmm Cirs-J t ■ mkW Satis! 



MOON 




I 




"The War Cry." Jas. 29th 

We understand that Moon and Morris, who are playing Keith's. Washington, this week, are buying 
Horses for the British Government. (We think this is a STALL.) 

Dlraettosi - H. B. MABJNELLI 



THE ILLUSIONIST EXTRAORDINARY 



Next Wseh (Feb. 5) 
Keith's, Providence, R. I. 



direction, MORRIS & FEIL 



*-l^WNHI 





This Week 

<Jan. 29) 
Afhnmbw 
New York 



Permanent Address: VARIETY, New York 




DOLLY 




AND 

ENTERTAINERS OP THREE CONTINENTS 
COMEDY DUO EXPERT ECCENTRIC TERPSICHOREAN DANCERS 

Booked solid W. V. M. A. Western Rep, JESSE FREEMAN. Eastern Re*., MARK LEVY. 




PRINCE 



[ 



KARMICRAPH 
NUMBER 



16 



KAR-MI 



VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST 

ILLUSIONIST SAYS: 

HE IS NOW PLAYING RETURN DATES OVER THE 
4 TOU CIRCUIT- WHICH SHOWS 
(Address VARIETY. New York) "KAR-MI GETS THEM IN" 



walte. DANIELS —WALTERS 



MINNA 



Laugh Getters 



MUSIC 



(TWO IN ONE) 
SINGING COMEDY CHARACTER STUDIES 






Direction. MORRIS * FEIL 

BELL 



BOOKED SOLID. 



AND 



FREDA 



w. v. m. a. THE SINGING LABORERS „. a a 



Class 




by "SIR" JAS. DWYER in THE LAW BREAKER' 




LITTLE DIXIE HARRIS 



mtXWvSWv 



U, B. O, smd Orphssjssi 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Dlrsctlsm. ARTHUR KLEIN 



jp'lM* 



e£&^ 




Week of Jan. 22nd Rochester 'Tost -Express" 
•ays: 

Van and Btllr, flying mlsslln experts, at the 
Temnlo this wot'k. bare the greatest norelty of 
the Mcadoii. Their oomody In tho high lights 
la gcMHl and Miss Bollt's laughter Is Infectious 
and natural. 

Direction, HARRY WEBER 



THE CLEVER MUSICAL COMEDY TENOR 



THE COMIC OPERA BASSO 



bert WAINWRIGHT and Wm. He WHITE & co. 

w "A Holland Romance" 



HJOH 



A MINIATURE OPERA IN ONE ACT BY GEORGE BOTSPORD 

SDCCINO COMEDY SPECIAL SCENERY AND COSTUMES 



so 



VARIETY 



ELSIE 




and EDDIE 

KLEIN 

IN A BLEND OP 
MIRTH, MELODY and MUSIC 

«>••** Irving Cooper 



ZENA 

ORIN SISTERS 




Touring Orpheum Circuit 

Direction, HARRY WEBER 




3 BENNETT 7 
SISTERS O 



Muscular 
Maid* In 

Mind Mil 

Maneuvers 



DlrMtion 

MAX E. 
HAYES 



W. E. WHITTLE 




Ventriloquist 



Remarkably 

w.n 

AU 



A Pair of Kings 

VESPO DUO 

Phenomenal Accordionist and Staffer 

Royally Relffntaff In Sunland 

Booked all April 

SMITH 



AND 



KAUFMAN 



fi» 



A Midnight Occurrence 

Now tourtaff Psntsffes Circuit 

Eastern Rep* IRVING COOPER 

Western Rsp., HARRY SPINCOLD 



Tjanet 



** & >♦ »• •- >'-)••»«, 




ADAI 



"Song Definitions" 

Assisted by 

EMMA ADELPHI 

Booked solid Orpheum. U. B. O. and 

Interstate 

Direction, HARRY WEBER 



Notice Received at Opening of 

Rial to Theatre, Chicago. 

Chicago "EvmIbc Anertesa." Jsa. 23. 1117 
Ed sad Irons Lowrr sans sad danced. Ed bu 



swivel Jointed knees, apparently, for he 
Us bis legs Into a double bow-knot 



to 
sad then 
Jump on them with Impunity, much to the delight 
of the entire house. 



ED and IRENE 

LOWRY 



BILLY 

NEWELL 

and 

ELSA 

MOST 

with 

Menlo Hoore s 
"Jot Rider." 

W.VSU. -4 • J.0 




VALDO ••< CO 




HINDU HOKUM 
Oriffinal Jeff Comedy 

I have two of the 
best "sword swsi- 
lowers" in captivity, 
Spivot end Pippick. 

. I challenge Kar-Ml 
to a contest. 



PETE MACK, 



Rsfsrss 



TEX and MABEL 



SHEA 

Present 
CLEVER COMEDY - PRETTY GIRLS 
Palace Theatre, Detroit, Mich., Indefinitely 



Enjoytaff the Sssson's Bast 

MODELS DE LUXE 

Over the W. V. M. A. 

Direction, HARRY SPINCOLD 



! SINGING COMEDY DANCING 

LITTLE JERRY 

The Smallest Man With the 
Biggest Voice 

TOURING THE COAST IN VAUDEVILLE 



JAMES < F "> 



THOMPSON 



"An Affair of Honor" 

Playinff U. B. O. That 

Harry Weber 




MIKE 



DONLIN 



and MARTY 



McHALE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Wally IVANHOFFia. Karl VALOYDA 

Russia's Foremost Tenor sad Pianist VOICE 01* 
CABU80 AND VOLUME OF MoCORMACH. 
IN AN ARTISTIC 




SHERLOCK SISTERS 




United Time 
Direction, CEO. CHOOS aad BILLY GRADY 



BACK AGAIN 




THE BRADS 

Ten Minutes In "One" 



George M. Rosener 

The Representative Canmeter Actor 
•f American Vaudeville. 



HAR3Y 



JENNIE 



PRATT * PRATT 



CLASSICAL AND POPULAR 
VOCAL SELECTIONS 



BILLY 



GEORGE 



Lloyd "* Britt 

In s "Mixture of Vaudeville," by Ned Dandy 

Direction, HARRY FITZGERALD 




Mile. La Toy s Canine Models 

Vaudeville's Prettiest Offering 
Booked solid W. V. M. A. and U. B. O. 
Eaat Rep., HARRY SHEA 

Wast. Rep., JESS FREEMAN 




RETURNING TO VAUDEVILLE 

After Two Years in Musical Review 

Billy 

SEYMOUR and 

Hazel 

WILLIAMS 

IN A NEW TRAVESTY 

"WHEN DO WE EAT" 

IS Minutes of Lauffhter and Sons; 

N. B.-We still retain ALL RIGHTS to 
our other act. So keep off I 



STUART 
BARNES 

Direction. JAMES E: "PLUrtKtTTt ~ 



THE FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A SUPREME OFFERING 
Representative, JACK FLYNN. 



i 






VARIETY 



i 




m 



%r% 



o. l t tMi 



B^T ki H*r«x I ale] 

of Htfc 







I 




This WNk (Jan. 29}-Majeetic DeDaa, Tan. 

N«t WMk (Feb. 5)-MaJoatlc, Houtaa, Ti 



This will be our last ad for awhile, owing to 
the condition* of the oountry hereabouts (Dry). 
Our brains have become dormant and we cannot 
think of anything bright to say. Henceforth from 
now 



RAWLS 



AND 



VON KAUFMAN 

will be traveling the straight and narrow. 

P. 8.— In preparation for 1918. a "Dry Act." to 
be produced In May at the T. C. Y. C Amen. 
This Week (Jan. 18)— Paataoes. Edmonton. Canada 
Next Weak (Feb. 5)— Paataget. Calgary. Canada 



BILLY SCHEETZ 
BETTY EDERT 



<i 



Whittier's Barefoot Boy 

A CLASSIC IN "ONE" 
Direction, NORMAN JEFFERIES. 



ft 



MESSRS. HUGHES AND SMITH 
Present THE PINT-SIZE PAIR 

JOE 

LAURIE and 

ALEEN 

BRONSON 

* "LOST AND FOUND" 

Next Week (Fob. 5) .-Riverside, New York. 









DOGSENSE 



LADY 

says: 



Good eeneo and nonaonao nro aa atniflar that 
the dividing lino cannot bo aura aometimoo. 

P. S.— If you want to know mora about mo, 
•»k NAT SOBEL. 




K money ia the root 
of evil, there are quite 
a few of us living 
like air plants— with no 
root at all. 



BILLY 
BEARD 



Harry WnUr 




NOUN 



AND 



NOLAN 




On the Bill With Biilie Reeves, 



The Original Drunk. You ought to hear him 
rave over my home town. Stockholm. Sweden. 
Warning to all Swede pool players: Lay off Joe 
Laurie. Can he play? Just try him. 
This Weak (Jan. 28)— First Half. Praetor's. Yea* 
ken, N. Y.; Last Half. 0. H., New Brunswick. N. J. 

Next Week (Feb. 5)— Colonial. Now York 
Weak Fab. 12— Al nasi bra. Now York 

Asset. NORMAN JEFFERIES. 



yp HAA.KQt.OOy^/fOaW CJOSC - UPS- 



Bo« THC OPt?NiA/G-THO 
S«ASOAf ( A klG#CrCAJ7A/6- Poarefc. 
Of f\ MODe*Ajfr«l«U,U/I^AFTe* 
COMIAJCr tNTO SClaKV, GwTTVS 

OsrweffA/ -rue nuoieMce fitoo 

f\ STnTOA/^r LtfrKT, OlSCUtfM/fr- 
€TTC $KiRr5- ft *<J*PRtS6r 

f\uo A HefKRry lru&h— 
Fou%.y coPyrFfO-HTsa-D «*# 

P^oTHcrco- 

3a?iXuJUBO T*The*<AJL-~ 

#— C HMlXOtQfrrjT: — r 
Com« < aa>fl/-TX41 w«co^»lC <riRU~ 



"MR. MANHATTAN" 

Fred Dnprez 



Tips to Leaders and Con doctor*: 

Useth not a crowbar as a baton 
for any but the heavier selections. 
The season's style runneth more to 
refined and light apparatus — a non- 
leaks ble fountain pen being considered 
au fait In the more select musical 
circles. 




Sam Baerwitz 

Broadway, Now York 



Tho VENTRILOQUIST 
WITH A PRODUCTION 



ED. F. 



REYNARD 

t Addreee, Markm Thoatro, Marion, O. 




ImslaVN^ 




JUtbtic Bum Of 
Veimpiuvv 

Direction, 

NORMAN JEFFERIES 






LMGFOID 

Principal Comedian with 
"Katlnka" 
Direction, Chamberlain Brown 



fir ifyslshtf." vr>).ii \fri- .X-v?. !iu L - a V: »ft', <iitf 
Slvo it the UafiptH-rry. 

In America, when they don't like an act. they 
Csn it. 

We never did care for Canned Fruit. 

MARTYN and FLORENCE 

Next Week (Feb. 5)-Majeatie, Erie, Pa. 



James Patrick Aloysius Harkins 



Marian Christine Barbara Harkins 

We are accompanied by the youngest member 
of the family— 

Dorothy Marian Harkins 

8 Weeks Old 

This Weak (Jan. 10)— Keith's. Dayton. 0. 
Next Weak (Feb. 8)— Colonial. Akron. 0. 

Bob Datley— Please write. 
Bruce sends love. 



Hear Tho 

Applause and LaugMer. 

Who Is On Tho Stage? 

Doorman Answers 

You Know JIMMY FLETCHER— 

Wall, Ifa Tho Act That Follows Him. 
Curtain? 

Benefit amy spec laity youre, 

JIMMY FLETCHER 

"A Study la Suppleness" 
Stall Tour . Direction, 

Mark Levy 



THE 
BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION 

Catherine 
Crawford 

AND HER 

FASHION 
GIRLS 

Direction. 

Arthur Pearson 




After Canvassing 

An Arab Troupe— It Developed That It Consisted Of 

4 Greeks Booking Restaurant Sites. 
1 Mongolians — Awaltlna Laundry Jobs. 
1 Italian— Freeh For Subway Triumphs. 

ALL OKAY AT 250 

(2nd show— S:J7; 3rd— 8:4t) 
Kut weeks Kindlee Keep Away 

Harry Sydell 

Loow Circuit Direction, JyJ ark L©Vy 



BLACKFACE 



EDDIE ROSS 

Nell O'Brien Mlnatrela 
10-17 

Permanent Addreaa, VARIETY, Now York 




PAULINE 
SAXON 

SAYSs 

When I was young, I used 
to think I'd be rich, great 
and saintly. But lately I'm 
constrained to say I've felt 
some small doubts stirring 
faintly. 



a 



BABECOOK 



in n new net in one. Author — Jamea Madlaon. 
Wardrobe— Hardy and Benham. Scenery- 
Fredericks. 



Iwl 

and 



IM 



. 



K 



THE SINGER AND THE DANCER 
Playing Loow Circuit 

Direction, TOM JONES. 




HELLO. 

EDWIN 

ARDEN ! 

Greetings! I am 
down here at 
boarding school. 
Bather nifty place, 
but I'm getting so 
fat I den Vsuppose 
I'll be any good. 
only for "charac- 
ters" hereafterl 



OSWALD. 
WOOMIM 

P. «.— Plenty of 
"Caste" hare; so 
that leu ma outl 



Thanks to Cole. Russell and Davis for the 
appreciative suggestion. 

Laurie and Bronson want "sholts" and wo 
want a cat. We lost one lately and the present 
one has no life about nun. Billy Sheets taints It's 
the food. We know It's not. because we didn't 
give him any yet. 





Fred (Hank) 




and 

Harry (Zeke) 





IM 



(and Cat) 
la "MAGIC PILLS" 
Direction. MAX GORDON 



Clyde Phillips 

Offara 

That Beautiful Act 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 
BIRDS 

Not lust an act. but a trig, 
bright, sparkling spectacular 
novelty feature. 

When a manager offara this 
ahow to his patrons, he ia 
giving them something for 
their money. 

MARK MONROE 
lott BROADWAY 





VAUDEVILLE'S 

MOST ARTISTIC 

DANCER 

Vera 
Sabina 

Booked Solid 



MAX GORDON 



SAM and KITTY 

MORTON 



With all credit to that mow author, Herhart 
Moore, for corking? mow opening aong ansa! 
the Boat Routine of Dlalo* wo 



. 



MAX HART, POai. 



KElTandDeMONT 



IRWIN'S MAJESTIC* 



BESSIE LEONARD 



Kid la Komody 
Ml Covo St, Now Haven, Conn. 



CLAUDZ 



CLAJftA 



Goldiagaiad Keating 

Boohed aolld W. V. M. A. 

Eastern Rep., ROSE A CURTIS 

Weatern Rep., BEEHLER A JACOBS 



VARIETY 





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VOL. XLV, No. 11 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




VARIETY 



JOS. M. SCHENCK 



PRESENTS 







ROYE 




Vaudeville's Youngest Singing Comedienne 

For a Tour of the 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

(PLAYING A FULL WEEK IN EACH THEATRE) 



Opening February 19th at Loew's 7th Avenue Theatre 



Personal Direction, IRVING COOPER 






' 



' 



f* 










VOL. XLV, No. 11 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



FAILURE AGAIN MARKS RATS' 
STRIKE ATTEM PT IN BOSTON 

Second Try C*lls Out Members With Some Responses, But 

no Performance Interrupted and Affair Fiziles Down to 

"Picketing" Theatres. Peculiar Angle to Boston 

Through Different Booking 
Connections. 



Boston, Feb. 7. 

The long threatened strike of the 
White Rats Actors' Union finally be- 
came a reality in this and surrounding 
cities Monday, when the organization 
officials served written notice on all 
acts (both Raits and non-Rats) appear- 
ing at the theatres owned by Nathan 
Gordon and Dr. Lothrop not to play the 
Monday night show. 

The houses affected were the Scollay 
Square, Olympia and Bowdoin Square, 
Boston, and the Olympia, Lynn. The 
Bowdoin Square is owned by Dr. Loth- 
rop. The others are Gordon houses. 

These theatres are booked through 
the Sheedy agency in New York and it 
seems significant the Gordon theatres 
in Chelsea and Gloucester (booked 
through the Boston United Booking 
Office s branch) were not included in 
the strike order. * 

The strike orders were issued at six 
o'clock Monday night when a number 
of organization officials scampered 
around the hotels and restaurants until 
they had located every act playing the 
houses affected. The acts were handed 
long official looking documents, which 
read as follows: 

"All members are hereby forbidden to 
enter the Olympia, Boston, or appear 
upon the stage of the Olympia, Boston, 
until further notice. The bearer of 
this order will present credentials show- 
ing his authority." 

The orders were signed in typewrit- 
ing by Harry Mountford and James W. 
FitzPatrick. Geoffrey Whalen's name 
was signed in ink. 

The acts who obeyed the order were 
Bubbles, Trout and Mermaid, Univer- 
sity Four and Henry Horton and Co., 
who left the Olympia; Nelusco and x 
Hurley, Penn City Trio, Corcoran and 
Mack and Dayton Family, who left the 
Scollay Square, and Mott and Max- 
field, Brinkman and Steele Sisters, and 
Selbini and Grovini, out of the Bow- 
doin Square. 

When the Vaudeville Managers' Pro- 
tective A*£Oc;aticn were apprised of 
the move, notice was served on the 
Boston V. M. P. A. branch to take tem- 
porary charge of the situation. Acts 
were sent to the affected theatres from 



all Boston vaudeville theatres, includ- 
ing the Keith house, to play one show 
in order to allow the eastern office to 
transport sufficient talent to New Eng- 
land to prevent any theatre going dark. 1 
Every show Monday was played with 
a complete bilL 

Tuesday morning the machinery of 
the Managerial Association was in ac- 
tion. Pat Casey arrived in Boston 
with about 60 acts to supervise the .af- 
fair. A number of united agents were 
delegated to various portions of New 
England to be on the look out for trou- 
ble, but nothing happened. 

Tuesday afternoon all the affected 
theatres played to big houses, despite 
the efforts of four organization pickets, 
who walked up and down before the 
doors of each house, shouting, •This 
theatre ia unfair to organized labor." 
The pickets were not nterfered with 
by the managers but at the Bdwdoin 
Square two pickets who gave the names 
of Lew Moore and Arthur Leroy were 
arrested by the uniformed policeman, 
charged with loitering and sauntering. 
Their case came up Tuesday afternoon 
and Attorney Tohn Glynn, who defend- 
ed them, asked for a long postponement 
on the ground many other pickets 
would be arrested for the same offense. 
The court intimated if Glynn's client, 
the Rats, would have many similar 
cases an early disposition should be 
made of the first offenders to establish 
the status of the situation. They were 
held in $200 bail for further hearing. 

Nathan Gordon left Boston for New 
York Tuesday night to attend a special 
meeting of the Managers' Association. 
Before leaving he advised a Varcttt 
representative that from now on his 
theatres would be supplied by the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation in conjunction with the Sheedy 
office. 

While the strike of the Rats proved 
a dismal failure, since it failed to close 
any theatre, the important angle of the 
situation depends on the action of the 
Central Labor-* Union-, and- -whether -:t 
will boycott the theatres, which' would 
mean instructing members not to pat- 
ronize any blacklisted theatres. The 
(Continued on page 7.) 



CENTURY'S STAR BOUT. 

The second all-star boxing bout at 
the Century A. G, situated behind the 
scenes at the Century theatre, took 
place Saturday night during the last act 
of the performance. The articles were 
signed a few minutes before the bout 
went on, the preliminary being talk 
about the war. According to the sport- 
ing writer neither of the contestants re- 
ceived any great damage. Two chorus 
girls prevented a continuation of the 
fistic display. However, at present 
Hazel Dawn thinks that she can clean 
up for Elsie Janis and Elsie Janis 
thinks that she can do likewise for Ha- 
zel Dawn — so there you are. 



ELMENDORF AT AMSTERDAM. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

"Miss Springtime" will move from 
the Amsterdam at the end of March, 
Elmendorf, the lecturer, being slated to 
succeed that attraction and remaining 
until the "Follies" are ready. Elmen- 
dorf has been drawing capacity at 
Orchestra Hall here. 

In addition to his talks, there are 
pictures of foreign countries and he 
also plays the piano. Attracted by his 
success, A. H. Woods, during his re- 
cent visit, placed Elmendorf under 
contract and planned to present him at 
the Eltinge, but the Amsterdam was 
selected because of its capacity. 

The lecturer will tour under Mr. 
Woods' direction next season. His 
previous showings in New York were 
given at Carnegie Hall. 



ENGLISH SONG WRITERS DUE. 

Norworth & Shannon are bringing 
to America from London, R. P. Weston 
and Bert Lee, two of the best known 
song writers in England. Thev have 
written more popular ditties for the 
English music halls in the past 20 years 
than almost all the other song writers 
in that country. 

DILLINGHAM, AUTHOR. 

There is being rehearsed daily at the 
Globe a rather pretentious vaudeville 
act, written by Charles Dillingham, 
with music by Clare Kummer. 

Mr. Dillingham, before theatering, 
was a writer of some prominence in 
newspaperdom and a brilliant lyricist. 



NAZIMOVA'S DAILY MATS. 

Nazimova in "Ception Shoals" will 
remain at the Princess next week, al- 
though arrangements had been made 
for the opening of "Oh Boy" at that 
house. The Nazimova piece has been 
doin# a sell-o'-tt business since open* 
ihg and for the "final week daily mat- 
inees will be given. 

'^Oh Boy" will lay off next week, 
opening the following Monday. 



"WANDERER'S" PAY ROLL 

The salary pay-roll for "The Wan- 
derer," at the Manhattan opera house, 
is $11,500 weekly, divided among 59 
principals. The play has no super- 
numeraries, nor does the salary list 
include operators. 

The show opened Thursday night, 
playing Friday and Saturday before the 
first pay day arrived, when the Belasco- 
Gest-Elliott management paid the en- 
tire company for a lull week, making 
them a present of $6,000. James O'Neii 
is said to have remarked when receiv- 
ing his full salary that during his 50 
years in the show business, it had never 
before happened to him. 

Through removing the picture booth 
upstairs, 200 seats have been gained 
for the Manhattan. With its present 
$1.50 admission scale, the big house can 
hold $31,000 gross on tht week. The 
Sunday vaudeville (Loew) concerts at 
the Manhattan have been discontinued 
during the play's run. There are only 
three other cities in the United States 
capable of housing the huge attraction. 
They are Philadelphia, Boston and 
Chicago. 

"The Wanderer" is predicted to be a 
bigger mammoth production success 
than "Ben Hur" was. It is already 
set for a continuous stay at the Man- 
hattan. 

The show's management is receiving 
considerable credit along Broadway for 
going into this big production and fur- 
ther risking it by placing the piece at 
the Manhattan, a house far from the 
central theatrical district 

Following the first performance Mor- 
ris Gest gave the stage hands a present 
of $500 in appreciation of their work 
toward the smoothness of the opening 
performance. 



ROUTE FOR EVELYN NESBIT. 

Tbe Evelyn Nesbit-Jack Clifford new 
act has been given a vaudeville route 
at $2,000 weekly. It opens next week 
at the Alhambra. H. B. Marinelli did 
the booking. 

ENGLISH GIRL'S VAMP DEBUT. 

Boston, Peb. 7. 
Robert Campbell will revive M A Fool 
There Was" at the Castle Square for 
three weeks opening Feb. 19. William 
Courtleigh will play the role created 
by Robert Hilliard, with Irene Leonard, 
an English actress (first appearance in 
this country), as the vampire. 



Rogers Forced to Change Dialog. 

Chicago, Feb /. 

The serious turn of, the .ajffoirfl of the 
Government and the break with Ger- 
many has forced Will Rogers, with the 
"Follies," to change the entire trend 
of his talk in the show. 



CABLES 




IN LONDON 



, ■ 



.ic-.'. » ■ » 



, .,. .%...# .-•».. I-. . .1 . 



■ ».\t i r / » • », 



J 



London, Jan. 22. 
A new American enterprise is soon 
to be started in London in the shape 
of "A Luxury Club," to be opened 
shortly in Leicester Square. It will be 
called "Old Kashmir" and the interior 
has been converted into a number of 
furnished Chinese apart- 



expensive iurnisncu \,uiu«»* .-■'.". 
ments. The walls are paneled with 
antique Chinese paneling and drapea 
with old Chinese silk tapestries. The 



furniture is of Eastern manufacture and 
Oriental lamps complete the Eastern 
effect. It is proposed to have on sale 
all the luxuries ol the East. Cigars will 
be from three dollars each and cigar- 
ettes two and a half dollars a box of 
ten. The membership is to be limited 
to fifty and no guests are to be al- 
lowed. All these luxuries being for 
members only, their motto being 
"Money no object" There are to be 
cabaret performances by high class per- 
formers, where again no expense is to 
be considered. 

Ciro's Club, which recently lost its 
license from serving alcoholic liquors 
out of hours, intends to run a cabaret 
This idea is likely to be frustrated by 
the government taking over the prem- 
ises for war work. 

"Monsieur Beaucaire," which must 



tuted are thanked, but others, it ap- 
pears, have profited by the situation by 
still paying the same price as during 
the first year of the war. 

If managers close, the "artists" ask 
the government to assure them employ- 
ment in munition factories. 

The president of the music hall man- 
agers' syndicate in Paris, although the 
manifest only refers to cafe concerts 
and small-time vaudeville halls, states 
he agrees with the "artists' resolution, 
but must disclaim any knowledge of 
establishments still paying the low 
war-salary mentioned. However, he 
warns all concerned the managers are 
unanimous (some exceptions) that if 
the government does not give satisfac- 
tion to their claims by Feb. 1, there will 
be a general closing. The managers 
(owners) are willing to accept the new 
taxes, but demand they be more equit- 
able. As the tax now stands the large 
houses pay the same as the small. The 
president explains his syndicate does 
not wish to see the vaudeville houses 
close and only radical action will be 
taken if it is found some of his col- 
leagues will be ruined by the way the 

'stributed, a higher 
the cheaper resorts 
ones, 
taking place among 



tax is at prese 
percentage bet 
than the expe 
The agitation" 




the owners of the small cafe concerts 



"Monsieur Beaucaire, wmen mu« and gomc of tb€ Uttlc picture houses. 
always bo associated with the late.., The largcr establishments have applied 
Lewis Waller, is to be thc ^ to fa public and ihtn ha§ ^^ 

no appreciable falling off in receipts. 
In the eenl of a strike or a general 
closing in February, as threatened, the 
legitimate houses and first-class vaude- 
ville theatres will not join or be af- 
fected, unless it is in additional patron- 
age. The government officials have 
promised to study the claims presented, 
particularly a proposition of placing 
picture houses which include a few 
vaudeville acts in the show on the same 
basis of taxation as the music halls. At 
present the aspect is that of a storm in 
a tea cup. 



light opera. The music is to be com- 
posed by M. Messager and Godfrey 
Tearle will probably play the leading 
role. 

A principal feature of the new Hip- 
podrome revue "Zig-Zag" will be a pre- 
historic ballet based on George Robey's 
"Prehistoric M?" " song, which he made 
popular in the provinces a long time 
ago. 

Ernest C. Rolls has arranged with 
Alfred Butt to produce the next Em- 
pire revue early in March. Ernest 
Rolls is the stage name of Adolph Da- 
rewski, a brother of Herman and Max. 
The latter composes the music of the 
new show. 

London, Jan. 25. 
The Bechstein concert hall has been 
reopened under the name of Wigmore 
Hall. 

Madame Tetrazzini has given up her 
villa on Lago Magiori to the Red Cross 
Society, and is in other ways doing her 
bit of war work. Madame Melba and 
Clara Butt are other famous singers 
who have raised large sums of money 
for the sick and wounded. 



IN PARIS. 

Paris, Jan. 25. 

Another meeting of artists in Paris 
has ben held to "talk over" the possible 
effect of the new tax on salaries. It is 
feared the managers may attempt to 
cut salaries if the public make a pacific 
protest by remaining away from the 
theatres where the extra price of the 
tax has been placed on tickets. All 
houses are making the public bear the 
tax. If there is a reduction in salaries 
or staffs the stage hands and small acts 
declare they will strike; the small cafe 
chantants state in that case they will 
put up the shutters. 

The group known as the Solidarity 
an opposition union to the French mu- 
sic hall artists' syndicate, have pub- 
lished a resolution addressed to the 
authorities. In this document they call 
on managers Jo. jmake a pledge they 
■wi'l cat salaries "to pay the tax (if the 
public won't stand for it). Those man- 
agers who have voluntarily paid better 
prices since the war-salaries were insti- 



Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac re* 
places H. Bataiiic s L'Amazone at the 
Porte Saint Martin. Hertz and Coqn 
lin will also change the show at the 
Ambigu, reviving the operetta "Mam- 
zelle Nitouche" in place of "La Rou- 
sotte." 

The new comedy, "La Veille 
d'Armes," by C. Farrere and L. Nepoty, 
at the Gymnase, is a mixture ot the 
spectacular Chatelet and the thrilling 
Grand Guignol. It is an unqualified 
success. Jeanne is married to a cap- 
tain of a war cruiser j he is much her 
senior and she deceives him with a 
young officer on board his own ship. 
One evening while in her lover's cabin 
the ship puts to sea, and is torpedoed 
by a German submarine. The lover is 
drowned, but Jeanne and her husband 
are saved. When the captain is tried 
for the loss of his ship he declares he 
made the regular signals, but only his* 
wife can prove it She gh«t away fear 
own honor to save her husband's, who 
pardons her. The play will have a 
good run. 

L. Rigaux and C. Fichefet, the Paris 
agents, have brought out a new theatri- 
cal organ, "Le Theatre et la Musique." 
Well edited and printed, it should meet 
with merited success among French 
readers. 

Lucien Guitry will shortly revive at 
the Gaite "Servir," by late Henri 
Lavedan, and "Crainquebille," of Ana- 
tole France, to substitute "Miette," 
which sas not taken with the public, in 
spite of the laudatory notices of the 
local critics, Guitry will hold the leads 
in both pieces given in same program. 



"ZIG ZAG" CAPITAL 

London, Feb. 7. 

"Zig Zag" was produced at the Hip- 
podrome Jan. 31. It is a capital revue, 
full of life and color. George Robey 
appears in seven scenes and is a host 
unto himself. Shirley Kellogg is at 
her best and Daphne Pollard, making 
her debut in London, it a pronounced 
success. 

The piece was written by Albert de 
Courville and Wal Pink and produced 
by Ned Wayburn. 



PAUL RUBENS DIES. 

London, Feb. 7. 

Paul Alfred Rubens, the dramatic 
author and composer, died at Falmouth 
Feb. 5 of consumption. His demise is 
regretted by all as he was very popular 
throughout the profession. 

Rubens was engaged to be married 
to Phyllis Dare, but when his health 
began to fail some months ago he in- 
sisted on breaking off the engagement. 



"WONDERLAND" WINNER. 

London, Feb. 7. 

Monckton Hoffe's play. "Anthony in 
Wonderland," was produced at the 
Prince of Wales Feb. 1. 

It is a brilliant comedy, containing a 
splendid part for Charles Hawtrey and 
introduces a kinema scene. It is cer- 
tain to prove a winner. 



TRADE LIKES FOX FILM. 

London, Feb. 7. 

William Fox's film production of "A 
Daughter of the. Gods was shown pri- 
vately to the trade at the Pavilion, 
Marble Arch, last week\ 

The majority of those present voted 
it a huge success. 

Winnie Sheehan. now over here rep- 
resenting Fox, will sail for home about 
Feb. 20, if a boat is available. 



RAY COX RETURNING. 

London. Feb. 7. 
Ray Cox, the American comedienne, 
is to return to America late this month. 
A number of Americans here are pre- 
paring to sail for the States since that 
country broke off relations with Ger- 
many. 




HwKt^MI4|'hi 



_ .FRANK VAN 

HOVEN 




What doea VAN HOVEN do to pass his time 
away in England? His man calls him at eight- 
thirty and he gets up at ten, has breakfast 
and on his auto-ped he goes to the golf course, 
then returns to do some writing, then to the 
theatre to practice his dandtng. 

What he doesn't know about the doings of 
the show world is Tery little. He know every 
act and what they do, and from the reviews of 
them ha notices that some of his friends still 
remembri his little bits. If they have for- 
gotten a*^i, ICE should remind them. 



OBJECT TO AMERICAN WRITERS. 

London, Feb. 7. * 
There has been somewhat of a stren- 
uous oposition against the importation 
to England, hy, After* ,4.e. .Courville of 
Gene Buck and Dave Stamper, who 
wrote the greater part of the lyrics 
and music for the "Zig Zag" revue. 
Various lyrists have written to the 
London publications voicing their 
grievances, dubbing the Americans as 
"neutral, talent." This was prior to 
America's break with Germany. 



"RING BOYS" AT OPERA HOUSE. 

London, Feb. 7. 

Oswald Stoll is to revive the big 
Alhambra success, "The Bing Boys 
Are Here," at the London opera house 
at the conclusion of the run of the 
pantomime "Cinderella," now there. 

It is to be. rewritten, with Yorke and 
Leonard playing the Boys and Ella 
Retford in the role of Emma. 



"P. k P." LEAVING. 

London, Feb. 7. 
"Potash & Perlmutter in Society" 
will be withdrawn from the Queen's 
Saturday and succeeded by "The Dou- 
ble Event," a new comedy starring 
Ethel Irving, who recently returned 
from South Africa. 



"BING GIRLS" NOW. 

London, Feb. 7. 
"The Bing Girls," a new revue, a sort 
of sequel to "The Bing Boys Are 
Here," will be produced at the Alham- 
bra, Feb. 19. 

BUTTS NEW THEATRE 

London, Feb. 7. 
Alfred Butt has secured a site for a 
new theatre and will commence con- 
struction of it immediately at the con- 
clusion of the war. 



STRONG 3-A-DAY BILL. 

London, Feb. 7. 
The Palladium, giving three shows 
daily, has a strong bill this week, in- 
cluding Camille Clifford, Sam Barton 
and Hilda Glyder. 

"Young England** Moving to Drnry 

Lane. 

London, Feb. 7. 
Robert Courtneidge's production of 
"Young England," now at Daly's, was 
withdrawn Feb. 3 and will be trans- 
ferred to the Drury Lane after the run 
of "Puss in Boots." 



WAR SONGS. 

Simultaneous with the President's 
declaration to Germany and with the 
possibility of war with that country 
stronger than eyer since the beginning 
of European hostilities, the local song 
writers began to conceive lyrical ideas 
touching on the military question. 

Bert Grant has contributed "Neph- 
ews of Uncle Sam" to the Waterson, 
Berlin & Snyder catalog, while th» 
Shapiro-Bernstein firm will revive "My 
Country, I Hear You Calling Me." 

The other firms are waiting for 
something definite to happen, but the 
chances for a flock of war ditties being 
thrown on the music market seems de- 
cidedly good. 

The Snyder concern may again re- 
vive, "I'm On My Way to Mexico," 
substituting "Germany." 

A notice was issued this week to all 
the B. F. Keith theaters in New York, 
notifying the managements not to per- 
mit any "war song" to be sung that 
mentioned any other country than the 
United States. 



Lardner-Williama Baseball Comedv. 

Chicago, Feb./. 
Ring W. Lardner, who has gained 
fame as a humorist in the last two 
ycar« v is tG become a pia?wrT&itt and 
has turned over to Bert Williams the 
manuscript of a baseball comedv which 
he wrote with the "Follies" star in 
mind. 



f 



VAUDEVILLE 



W. R. A. U. LEVIES ASSESSMENT 
0Fi5 PERCEN T: ON W ORKERS' PAY 

Money Ordered Sent to Harry Mountford or James W. Fitz- 
Patrick. Managers Learn of Move, and Will Cancel 
Assessment-Payers* Order Goes for Cabaret. 

t. and Burlesque Members. 



At the Tuesday night meeting of the 
White Rats in New York it was an- 
nounced an assessment of five per cent 
upon the salaries of al} working mem- 
bers had been laid. This assessment in- 
cluded those in vaudeville, burlesque, 
cabarets and legitimate and was to 

start immediately. The announcement 
also stated the money was to be sent 
direct to Harry Mountford in Chicago 
or James W. Fitz Patrick in Boston. 
The reason for the direct remittance 
was given to avoid the expense of re- 
mitting to the White Rats headquarters 
in New York. 

The managers of the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective 'Association 
heard of the assessment Wednesday. 
A phone meeting was held between the 
members of the V. M. P. A. committee 
having such a matter in charge. It 
was decided to notify all managements, 
house and general, to take pains to 
ascertain any act working for them 
that forwarded money to the White 
Rats as an assessment or in other form 
and whether a member of the order or 
not. Immediate cancellation was to be 
the penalty with no reinstatement un- 
der any circumstances to follow for 
any act obeying the assessment order. 
Members of the managers' commit- 
tee said the order for penalizing assess- 
ment payers was more stringent than 
that issued for the punishment of acts 
paying dues to the Rats or remaining 
members of it 
i FitzPatrick made a long speech at 
the Tuesday night meeting. He urged 
moderation but it appeared to some of 
his listeners as though between the. 
lines could be read motive to incite. 
FitzPatrick said he would have to be 
in Boston for a long while, expecting 
the strike to be continued there for 
some time. He warned members not 
to go to Kansas City, Chicago or Bos- 
ton, as though trying to convey to 
them that there was or would be trou- 
ble at each of those cities. 

FitzPatrick spoke of bloodshed and 
said he could not sleep nights worry- 
ing over how to control the Rati whom 
he was afraid had gotten beyond his 
control. 

FitzPatrick informed the gathering 
the reason the Rats had brought a 
strike against the Gordon houses in 
Boston was that the Gordons were 
not members of the V. M. P. A. and 
could not be protected by that organ- 
ization, leaving their houses more vul- 
nerable than V. M. P. A. theatres. 

The president of the German branch 
of the Rats was present and spoke, 
mentioning the German branch would 
hold a benefit performance this coming 
Sunday night. 



DANCING AND A GYM. 

Dancing started in the clubrooms of 
the National Vaudeville Artists last 
night (Thursday.) 

The Artists' Club is trying to locate 
a space for a ballroom adjoining the 
club's present quarters. It also wants 
a gymnasium. 

It was brought to the attention of the 
National Vaudeville Artists this week 
that its present Board of Arbitration, 
five members, was ofttimes unable to 
collect through c~-c or mere of the 
members being absent from New York 
for the week or longer. 

It was suggested the N. V. A. amend 
its constitution to permit of selection 
from members then in the city, to fill 



temporary vacancies, in order the Board 
would always be in readiness to meet v 

This suggestion is said to have 
reached the N. V. A. after the meeting 
Tuesday of the Vaudeville Managers' 
Protective Association, which it close- 
ly following the N. V. A. development 

The past week was the N. V. A/a 
high water mark in point of applica- 
tions for membership, the number ex- 
ceeding the fondest wish of the club's 
officers. 



HOFFMANN'S ACT OF 35. 

The new Gertrude Hoffman vaude- 
ville act will have 35 people, besides 
the star. It is to open at the Bushwick, 
Brooklyn, Feb. 26, for its first week's 
date on the big time. 

Included in the turn will be some of 
the material Miss Hoffman used in her 
specialty on the Century Roof, among 
which is the aerial disrobing bit by her- 
self and some of the girls. 

Monday last Max Hoffmann-gave in 
his notice as leader of the Century 
theater orchestra. It's probable Mr. 
Hoffmann intends conducting for his 
wife's turn. 



FEIST WRITERS LEAVE. 

The Leo Feist firm lost three of its 
star writers within the past ten days. 
Two, Joe McCarthy and Fred Fischer, 
are reported contemplating operating 
a music publishing house under their 
own names. The third, Grant Clark, 
has re-engaged with Waterson, Berlin 
& Snyder, the firm- Mr. Clark was with 
when leaving for Feist 

The defections from the Feist writ- 
ing ranks are said to have followed 
shortly after the last Feist royalty 
statements were handed out 



Sheet Music West, 15c 

San Francisco, Feb. 7. 
Popular priced sheet music is sold 
this side of Salt Lake City, even in the 
5 and 10 cents stores, at 15 cents per 
copy, owing, it is said, to the heavy 
cJiajrgesoi^heshJDments^^^^^^^ 




JACK SQUIRE 

Playing "Dick Rivers" in F. Ray Comstock 
and Elizabeth Marbury't "VERY GOOD, ED- 
DIE," and under contract to CHAMBERLAIN 



B.Fa"'M, <r,r. 



•vs. 



i 



Mi. Dfo^ii reprracTrt* Dorothy Jardnn, 'Jo«e:- 
hine Victor, Emily Ann Wellman, Stella May- 
ew, Gertrude Vanderbilt, Aveling and Lloyd, 
Tyler Brooke, Helen Lowell. Georgia Harvey, 
Dave Ferguson, Mable Withee, Toby Claude, 
Sydney Shields, Burford Hampden, and others, 
exclusively. 



SHOWMEN-SOLDIERS CALLED. 

The theatrical militia men were noti- 
fied to report for duty this week. Mon- 
day, morning at. 8 o'clock they were 
mustered into active service again. 

Bill Wolfenden, formerly a sergeant 
in the 71st regiment, has been promoted 
to a captaincy and is in charge of a col- 
ored regiment, doing duty around the 
city bridges. Capt. Ray Hodgdon is 
back at his former post also. 

The city regiments of the National 
Guard returned but a short time ago 
from an extensive campaign on the 
Mexican border and are all in good 
physical condition. 



OFFERING RACE HERO DATE. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Jones-Linick-Schaefer are trying to 
induce Fred Hartman, hero of the dog 
sled race from Winnipeg to St Paul, 
to accept a vaudeville date at McVick- 
er's or the Rialto. 

Al Campbell, a Cree Indian, won the 
509 mile race, but Hartman was the 
sensation of the contest through his 
wonderful gameness in finishing with 
only four dogs, his "leader" being 
killed soon after the start. 



BIG BILTMORE BILL 

The vaudeville program at the Mary- 
land next week reads tike a Palace, 
New York, bill. Among its features 
are Emily Ann Wellman and Co., Brice 
and King, Bonita and Hearn and James 
J. Morton. 

WELLMAN SKETCH PLACED. 

"A Flash Drama," with Emily Ann 
W llman and Co., has been placeU in 
big time vaudeville for the next two 
years through Harry Weber, the act's 
representative. 

Miss Wellman's salary is in four 
figures. 



RUTH ROTE ON LOEW TIME. 

Commencing Feb. 19 Ruth Roye will 
open at Loews 7th Avenue, to play 20 
weeks on the circuit; a full week in 
each theatre, at $350 weekly. Irving 
Cooper acted a%, Miss Roye's repre- 
sentative. 

}£§ about three years ago Miss 
Royfe was playing for the Loew' people 
for M0 a week, then using the name 
of Roth Becker. Changing her title 
to Ruth Rove she started on the big 
time, as a single turn," the same as 
when with Loew. 



COHAN SHOW ACT. 

Boston, Feb. 7. 

After "The Cohan Revue" closes 
here, now slated for Feb. 17, it is quite 
possible the reported vaudeville com- 
bination of Blanche Ring and Charles 
Winniger will happen. 

The couple are asking $2,000 weekly 
for vaudeville and expect to open ac 
the Palace, New York, early in March, 
if not before. 

The Harry Weber agency, through 
George O'Brien, arranged for the 
vaudeville turn. 

Winniger is now with the Cohan 
show. 



CO-RESPONDENT NAMED. 

Philip Barrison appearing at the A1- 
hambra this week with Wilfred Clark 
was served with papers Monday in a 
divorce action brought against him by 
his wife, Dolly Lewis, through her at- 
torney, Abraham Beck. 

The wife named Maybelle Adams as 
the co-respondent. 



Divorce Granted Ethel Clifton. 
An interlocutory decree of divorce 
has been granted Ethel Clifton from 
her husband, Franklin Munnell. by 

jnfj^e Ke/jugh, - Th* „ra«r -svsi*. iteard 
in a private court held by Judge 
Keough in his home in New Rochelle, 
N. Y., to avoid notoriety. 

Miss Clifton produced two witnesses 
with the defendant offering no defense. 



TAMING BELLE BAKER. 

Somewhat drastic measures have 
been employed- within the past few 
..wejdta.-by .EddJ-*.DarIiRg< to force upon 
Belle Baker the conclusion that she is 
not absolutely essential to vaudeville, 
something, her demands appeared to 
indicate, was hovering around her hair. 

Mr. Darling books the big Keith 
theaters in New York, Washington and 
Boston (excepting Palace, New York). 
Each time Miss Baker's name appeared 
in the billing, Mr. Darling's troubles 
started, and each time he grew weary 
of the sport 

The culmination happened last week 
when Mr. Darling was informed Miss 
Baker would consent to appear at the 
Riverside next week, provided she split 
the headline with Fay Templeton and 
was given the star dressing room. (Nat 
C. Goodwin is also on the same bill). 

Mr. Darling's answer is said to have 
sizzled over the wires and told Miss 
Baker big time would try to be as com- 
fortable as possible without her pres- 
ence. Then came the explanatory an- 
swer and the Riverside program will 
play as arranged. 



IN PALM BEACH. 

Vaudevillians now at Palm Beach are 
Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Albee, Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin Beck, Mr. and Mrs. Reed Albee 
and Frank Vincent, Dr. and Mrs. 
Louder. 

The party excepting Mr. Vincent, 
who will return next week, expects to 
remain South about a month. 

Charles Dillingham and Flo Ziegfeld, 
co^managers of the Century, leave to- 
gether this week for the southern win- 
ter resort. 



" SIGN WITH SHUBERTS. 

* A contract for three years was en- 
tered into this week, through Rufus 
Le Mair, between the Shuberts and 
Henry Lewis, binding the comedian to 
the brothers' management for the next 
three years. 

After the close of the Anna Held 
show, with which Mr. Lewis is now 
playing, he will be starred by the Shu- 
berts in a three-act musical comedy 
written by Aaron Hoffman. 

Willie Weston, from vaudeville, has 
been engaged, also through the Le 
Maire office, to appear in a Broadway 
musical s how under the Shuberts' di- 
rection. 



MORTON'S COPY FLIVS. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Bob Hall's experiment as "announc- 
er" at McVicker's flivved but through 
no fault of Bob's. The audiences the 
first part of the week didn't seem to 
get the hand of Bob's flitting in and 
out so tho house management decided 
to call off the "announcing." Hall also 
agreed the Jim Morton stunt was not 
adapted to McVicker's. 



HORSE FRIGHTENS AUDIENCE. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

One of the horses in Guy Weadick*s 
"Stampede" at the Great Northern Hip- 
podrome Sunday night, while on the 
stage, became unmanageable and badly 
frightened the audience, although no 
person was hurt. 

After careening around the stage the 
horse dashed into the wings and a 
$5,000 organ belonging to Willard's 
Temple of Music. It badly damaged 
the instrument and caused Willard to 
cancel further engagements until re- 
pairs can be made. 

The theatre management made rep- 
aration to Willard. 



ELTWCE'S COMEDY SKETCH. 

Upon the close of "Cousin Lucy," 
Jane Oaker, supporting Mr. Eltinge in 
that piece, will appear in vaudeville 
with a musical comedy skit written 
by Eltinge. 



VAUDEVILLE 



I 



CHICAGO HAS RUMOR OF SPLIT 
BETWEEN WHITE R ATS LEADERS 

FitzPatrick'* Departure for the East Without Seeing Mount- 
ford Leads to Many Reports. Rats Members There 
Disavow Latter's Scheme of Procedure. 



LOEW BOOKING SYRACUSE. 

George B lumen thai closed Wednes- 
day to place the Grand, Syracuse, N. Y., 
on the books of the Loew office. 

B lumen thai Opened the hcuflc last 
week and ran a show for the full week, 

With the in augu ration of Loew vau- 
deville the sh4bj%jfi play six acts and 
a five-reel feature, splitting. 



Chicago, Feb. 7. 

That James W. FitzPatrick left Chi- 
cago Saturday for the east, without 
the knowledge of Harry Mountford, ac- 
cording to report, has started the ru- 
mor there is a split in the White Rats, 
of which FitzPatrick is president and 
Mountford, executive. 

One of the points made that there is 
a difference in the Rats forces is that 
FitzPatrick crossed the country to be 
near or in Boston Monday, m while 
Mountford was only a short distance 
(New York) from there before leaving 
for this city. 

The opinion locally is that FitzPat- 
rick took independent action in the Bos- 
ton matter, without consulting Mount- 
ford. 

The man" promises and insinuations 
of Mountford's and their ^ non-fulfill- 
ment are now counteracting against 
him. 

The endeavor to mislead actors into 
believing violence followed the Okla- 
homa Qty troubles has been so easily 
disproved around here that Mountford's 
reputation for veracity is receiving 
some hard blows of late. His entire 
scheme of procedure is said to have 
been disavowed by many Rats who 
fail to see any balance in the handling 
of the organization's affair for the past 
two months. 

These matters among many others 
are heard around in discussion now go- 
ing on regarding the position of the 
Rats with Mountford at the helm. 
They are claimed to be partially re- 
sponsible for the FitzPatrick-Mount- 
ford split if one exists, which is gener- 
ally believed. FitzPatrick is reported 
to have gone to church just before 
train time and left the church for tfte 
eastern bound train without seeing any- 
one. 

Mountford is now here. 



CHICAGO FEDERATION STALLING? 

Boston, Feb. 7. 

The White Rats around here have 
apparently reached the conclusion the 
Chicago Central Federation of Labor 
is spooffing them. Little stock is now 
being taken in the promises cf the 
Rats leaders they can look for any as- 
sistance from that quarter. 

Harry Mountford made a final fu- 
tile effort yesterday to boost his stock 
thereabouts by visitiig Federal District 
Attorney Clyne's office and repeat hh 
familiar assertion the managers' asso 
ciation is violating the Sherman law. 

District Attorney Clyne is reported 
to have patiently listened. He is said 
not to take the Rats protest seriously. 

Even the Chicago papers are grow- 
ing tired of all the Mountford an- 
nouncements with nothing but. The 
newspaper men say there are too many 
false alarms in the Rats affairs. 



CHICAGO TAKES IT LIGHTLY. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

The Boston strike was takei lightly 
here, even by the Rats themselves, 
who seem to put little confidence in 
the move, knowing the houses affected 
and guessing what acts might be play- 
ing there. 

There was some talk around of local 
trouble before the end of the week, but 
thct report #si ;;?(!-■.*<-» ^le^c,*', Mid.w** 
attributed to a Rats source. 

"The Tribune" Tuesday morning 
carried a short story to the effect there 
had been a strike in Boston Monday 



night. The paper commented briefly 
upon the actors' controversies with the 
managers. 

At the Chicago Federation of Labor 
meeting Sunday (weekly open meet- 
ing), it was announced the White Rats 
was not asking stage hands, musicians 
and operators to go out with it, but did 
ask if a strike occurred that the union 
affiliations in the theatres affected 
should attempt to show sympathy. This 
announcement was looked upon as a 
complete set-back for the Rats in their 
efforts to gain the support of the local 
federation. 

It is reported some acts in Canada 
have called upon James W. FitzPatrick 
to do something quickly to stop the 
practice of theatres giving seven and 
eight performances daily in some un- 
mentioned Canadian towns. 

Last night it was said Ernest Carr, 
a Rat deputy, had moved during the 
day from Oklahoma City to Kansas 
City. It was in Kansas City and St. 
Louis at the last strike move of the 
Rats trouble was anticipated. 

Chicago vaudeville managers appear 
unconcerned and those informed say 
the Rats selected the Gordon houses in 
Boston, knowing them to be the weak- 
est 

Otherwise the strike report was look- 
ed upon as a ripple and not accepted 
here as serious as the Oklahoma City 
strike affair was. 



MATTHEWS-DOYLE CLASH. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Bad feeling is said to nave broken 
out between Frank Q. Doyle booking 
for the Jones, Linick & Schaefer 
houses (Loew) and James Matthews, 
the Chicago representative for the Pan- 
tages Circuit (also Loew's bookings). 

Doyle placed Zelaya, the pianist, in 
the Rialto this week. The Pantages 
Circuit had the act booked to open 
Feb. 18, but Pantages re-routed the 
date to Feb. 11, when Matthews asked 
that Zelaya be relieved from playing 
at the Rialto in time to make the Pan 
opening. Doyle insisted Zelaya play 
the week out. 

The matter went before Aaron Jones, 
who decided Zelaya could leave in time 
to make proper connections. 



CALLS FpR AGENTS 9 LISTS. 

The agents booking vaudeville acts 
are still agitated over the possibilities 
confronting them, from the managerial 
end. Of late agents booking in the 
United Booking Offices have been 
asked to submit their lists of acts. 

The lists were demanded on the mo- 
ment, which left preparation out of the 
consideration and necessarily included 
for some of the agents the large quan- 
tity of deadwood they have been hawk- 
ing about for months without results. 

The agents would like to know what 
the intention is and the feeling of ap- 
prehension is growing more acute 
among them. 



BOOKING MAN BARRED. 

Lawrence Schwab has been barred 
from both floors in the United Book- 
ing Offices on charges of using unbe- 
coming language to one of the book 
men who did not please him. 

Schwab is with Alf T. Wilton. 



M'HUGH RECOVERS. 

Philadelphia, Feb. 7. 

Bart McHugh, the local big time 
agent, has been paid the $450 he ob- 
tained a judgment for against Bobby 
Heath, for commissions due. 

McHugh sued in this city and then 
had the judgment transferred to New 
York, where it was paid this week. 




NOLAN and NOLAN 

(Paul and May) 

"JUST TESTING JUGGLERS" 

Colonial Theatre, New York, This Week (Fck 5) 

J>?icjr Rjod. 8i. irg gcoj mam y t Kvirtg ±1 

good hotels, enjoying good health, 

traveling in good society, 

have a good agent, play good 

Eool, next week good at 
e Alhambra, New York. 

Direction. NORMAN JEFFERIES. 



FURNISHING PRESS AGENTS. 

The United Booking Offices is ex- 
perimenting with personal publicity 
for ^acts, through assigning a publicity 
agent to a turn capable of being 
boomed. 

The first instances of this in vaude- 
ville (where the booking office sup- 
plies the press agent at its own expense 
tor each individual turn) are the Cali- 
fornia Boys' Band and Mercedes. The 
trial is taking place on the Proctor Cir- 
cuit. Blank Schultz has been commis- 
sioned by the U. B. O. to accompany 
the Boys 1 Band, and Mrl Anna Tyndall 
has been withdrawn as the publicity ex- 
pert at Keith's, Dayton, to come east 
and specially publicize Mercedes while 
in the up-state Proctor houses. 

If the plan develops assuring results, 
it may be carried forward to the ex- 
tent of having a special publicity rep- 
resentative travel with the best known 
of the vaudeville turns. 

At the United offices it was stated the 
scheme was in embryo as yet and was 
being followed for future possibilities, 
The U. B. O. man stated the thought 
in connection with the scheme was 
only directed toward tangible benefits 
for the theater. 

The U. B. O. publicity departure is 
on off-shoot of the special publicity 
plan inaugurated for the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit by Nellie Revell. now at the Cen- 
tury's press post. Miss Revell, how- 
ever, acted as special publicist for all 
the big Orpheum acts, handling the 
matter from her New York office. 



TAMPA'S FAIR. 

Tampa, Fla., Feb. 7. 

The South Florida Fair and Gaspar- 
illa Carnival opened here Feb. 2 and 
thousands of visitors are in the city. 

The Con T. Kennedy Greater Shows 
are the feature carnival attraction 
with other amusements including 
Johnny Green, the aviator, Aerial Dick- 
etts, Famous Howard. Ella Lavail, Cur- 
tiss' Bears, Lorenz, Original Bernards, 
Major Bennett and Mr. and Mrs. Bert 
Davis (of Hoosier fame). 

Other attractions are engaged and a 
large program is being arranged for 
the affair. 



TAB PRODUCERS WANING. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 
According to plans now in the "As- 
sociation," the lines will be drawn 
closely on the tab producers next sea- 
son. One producer — most active at 
present — plans to have only jane com- 
pany, maybe two. Several producers 
with tabs in the storehouses have 
turned their attention to other theatri- 
cal pursuits. 



Orpheum, Hammond. 111., Stops. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

The Orpheum, Hammond, Ind., will 
not play vaudeville after Sunday, the 
cause being the lack of business. 

Stock will start Monday. 



Repairs Close Piedmont, Charlotte. 

Charlotte, N. C, Feb. 7 
The Piedmont, playing United Book- 
ing Offices vaudeville, has temporarily 
discontinued while the house is under- 
going some necessary repairs. 



Chattanooga House Name Changed. 
The Majestic, playing vaudeville, has 
had its name changed to Rialto. 



Vaudeville in Lincoln, Union Hill. 

Plans were consummated this week 
for the taking over of the Lincoln, 
Union Hill, a combination house by K. 
T. Marvin. The house will come under 
the Marvin manaeement March 1, 
playing six arts split week, booked by 
Fally Markus. 

Pantages-Hodkins Alliance Reported. 

Oiicago. Feb 7 ( . 
Some sort of a booking alliance is 
being industriously reported around 
here between Alexander Pantages and 
Charles Hodkins. It would affect 
southern territory only. 



[ 



VAUDEVILLE 









it 



SECOND STRIKE FAILURE. 

(Continued from page 3.) 

Central Union has 60,000 members liv- 
ing within tne nickel carfare zone. 

So far neither the stage hands nor 
musicians have indicated any intention 
or desire to declare a' sympathetic 
strike for the Rats and with the first 
attempt fizzling out, it looks as though 
the Rats will have to fight the situation 
alone. 

Fitz Patrick is expected in Boston 
today to attend the Central Labor 
Union meeting to be held tonight and 
he will probably make a plea similar to 
the one he made in Chicago to gain 
their support 

Whalen has stated that a public mass 
meeting will be held here within a few 
days, at which all the organization and 
labor union officials will speak on the 
situation. The Rats are holding se- 
cret meetings nightly, but nothing of 
importance occurs beyond an effort to 
keep the enthusiasm at high tension. 
This is the second attempt of the Rats 
to put over a strike in Boston. Their 
previous attempt did not draw a con- 
sent from any act It was then di- 
rected against the larger houses. It is 
believed the Rats, knowing a weakness 
existed in the Gordon Brothers' cur- 
rent bills, laid their plans against those 
houses accordingly. 

In Lynn the Gordons' Olympia was 
somewhat perplexed at first through a 
new manager being in charge there 
and Lynn being too far away from Bos- 
ton at the moment for assistance to be 
forwarded. 

The try to have the acts walk out in 
the Gordons' theatres at New Haven 
and Bedford never got started. These 
two houses play a split week. The 
theatres affected play a full week. 

It is said by Boston people, unin- 
terested, that the audiences Monday 
night at the several theatres where 
walkouts occurred did not know any- 
thing had happened. 

Arthur Leroy and Lew Moore, the 
two White Rats arrested for picketing 
in front of Bowdoin Square theatre, 
were fined $10 each by Judge Dowd in 
the City Court this morning, the Judge 
ruling that while peaceful picketing is 
permissible by law in Massachusetts, 
since the defendants were picketing in 
a manner to cause the assemblage of a 
crowd and obstruct the sidewalks they 
were guilty of an infraction of the law 
prohibiting sauntering and loitering. 

Mr. Glynn requested the fine be post- 
poned until tomorrow to allow the de- 
fendants to obtain the necessary $200 
bail, as he intended to appeal and bring 
it before a jury in the Superior Court. 
The Judge granted the request and the 
defendants were temporarily released 
on their personal recognizance. Glynn 
' thinks it impossible to find a jury in 
Boston that will not hold one or more 
members who favor picketing. 

Glynn will go before the Equity mo- 
tion session tomorrow a .id endeavor to 
procure an injunction restraining the 
police from interfering with pickets 
during progress of Boston strike. 

The props costumes and the trained 
seal of the Trout, Bubbles and Mer- 
maid act were held by the management 
of Bowdoin and Scollav erquare thea- 
tres when the acts struck. The man- 
agers declared they ,v»ould hold all 
property of strikers until the end of the 
week. Glynn procured a writ of re- 
plevin this morning, forcing the man- 
agers to release the property writ, ob- 
tained on the grounds that property 
was essential to aid owners in making 
their living. It is reported here Rats 
will endeavor to pull out acts during 
the week and on Monday they propose 
to issue orders to all Boston theatres, 
provided they procure moral support 
of Central Union. 

All houses, thi*.. afternoon did rea^ 
sonably big -busiuess. but picketing is 
-affecting a little. 

Many reasons were advanced in New 
York Tuesday why the White Rats had 
selected the Gordon Brothers' houses 



in New England, principally Boston, to 
lodge a strike against Monday night 

The Gordon houses have been booked 
through the M. R. Sheedy agency, 
which lately had an off-shoot connec- 
tion made with Lester Mayne and 
Stuart Kollins, who admitted they 
composed a "White Rats agency" in 
Boston. Sheedy in New York stated 
his connection with the Boston agency 
combination did not involve his New 
York office. It was the Mayne-Kollins 
agency connection that was angrily re- 
ferred to it is believed at a meeting 
of the Boston Rats last Friday night 

Although listed by the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Association as 
belonging to that organization of man- 
agers, the Gordon Brothers were affil- 
iated with it through the Boston V. M. 
P. A. branch, to which they belong. 
it was presumed in New York the Gor- 
don Brothers had been relying upon 
'promises" they would be immune from 
White Rat attack, but through abstain- 
ing from properly going on record as 
members of the V. M. P. A., they be- 
came the weakest point in the Boston 
field and were promptly set upon by 
the Rats of that section. 

New York also believed some "plant- 
ing" of "White Rat acts" had been 
done in the Gordon houses, for the pur- 
pose of having them "walk" when told 
to. 

The Gordon Brothers were offered 
immediate assistance by V. M. P. A. 
Pat Casey left for Boston early Tues- 
day morning. That same day many 
acts were sent over there from New 
York. At the Grand Central station 
several of the outgoing acts were im- 
portuned by the Potts Brothers, acting 
as pickets for the Rats organization, 
not to leave, but they were unsuccess- 
ful in their persuasive efforts. 

Monday midnight the White Rats 
press agent phoned the New York 
dailies the White Rats had called a 
strike all over the country and the 
vaudeville theatres in Boston, Lynn, 
Kansas City and St Louis were dark 
that evening. Early reports from Bos- 
ton Tuesday said the Monday night 
■hows there were given without suf- 
ficient annoyance for the audiences to 
notice. 

A wire from Vabibtt's regular Bos- 
ton correspondent Tuesday said the 
Boston people could not understand 
why jht Boston* Rats had picked on 
the Gordon Brothers' houses, the Gor- 
don Brothers, through Sheedy, sup- 
posedly leaning toward the Rats, with 
the Sheedy Boston branch openly mak- 
ing a play for such business as could 
be obtained through a supposedly 
White Rat connection. 

The Gordons last spring were nego- 
tiating with the Loew Circuit for book- 
ings, but it was reported after a time 
the negotiations were declared off. It 
was thought at the time that money in- 
terests then friendly to Sheedy, but 
since bought out in the Gordon nouses 
had intervened to hold the Gordons' 
bookings in the Sheedy agency. 

About the only curiosity expressed 
along Broadway Tuesday regarding the 
strike was to know the names of the 
acts that had "walked out," With ex- 
pressions of wonderment why the walk- 
ing out acts had "queered" themselves. 
It was universally accepted that the 
acts walking out had become marked 
forever with V. M. P. A. managers and 
booking agencies connected with that 
organization. 



RATS 9 SALARIES UNPAID. 

Reports of past meetings of White 
Rats in New York say attention has 
been called to the members that no dis- 
bursements were made by the order 
during the previous week. 

While the members could t£u;§_ judge 

that the officers ana the several depu- 
ties under salary had not been paid by 
the organization, it was intimated to 
the assemblage these salaried people 
in the Rats are not worried over the 
money due. 



ACTS THAT "WALKED." 

Boston, Feb. 7. 

The following are the vaudeville acts 
that walked out of the Gordon Brothers' 
theatres here and in Lynn Monday 
night: * 

Brinkman and Steele SUteis— smginsr. 

Bubbles, Trout and Mermaid— Tank 
act. 

Corcoran and Mack— comedy. 

Cham. McDonald and Co.— sketch. 

Dayton Family (11 people)— acro- 
batic 

Henry Horton and Co. — sketch. 

Frank King (Australian)— comedian. 

Lane and Lane — acrobats. 

Mott and Maxfield (man and woman) 
—comedy. 

Nelusco and Hurley — tonga 

Penn City Trio— tongs. 

Revert and Earl— song and dance. 

8elbini and GroYini (man and wom- 
an)— cycle. 

University Four— sonfs. 

The Dayton Family is known as a 
"circus act" (plays in circuses in sum- 
mer). There is 'no well known turn 
on the list Several of the acts above 
have played out their usefulness in the 
larger houses. 

RATS MEETING PICKETED. 

The White Rate weekly meeting 
Tuesday night in its clubhouse on West 
46th street was picketed from 10.30 un- 
til 12.30 by about 50 agents and book- 
ing men, who patrolled up and down 
before the clubhouse, in squads, being 
relieved at regular intervals. 

Two policemen were on the block 
to preserve the peace. 

A few White Rats stood on the club- 
house steps watching the pickets. Some 
words passed between the factions. 

The agents Wednesday morning 
turned in a list of names of persons no- 
ticed entering the club house, but from 
all accounts the list could nave been 
made up by anyone familiar with the 
usual Rats Tuesday night gathering in 
New York, without having taken the 
trouble to stand around in the cold. 
It was the customary crowd that goes 
to the clubhouse regularly. 



PICKETING RATS' BALL 

The Vaudeville Managers 1 Protective 
Association, at its meeting Tuesday, 
decided, according to report, to picket 
the White Rats' ball, to be held in Am- 
sterdam Hall, March 16. 

The picketing is for the purpose ot 
noting who may visit the ball, but in 
this particular instance the V. M. P. A. 
is using the picket thing, it is said, to 
secure the names of all who may pur- 
chase tickets to the affair or contrib- 
ute to it 

To obtain a full line upon ticket buy- 
ers several White Rats, according to 
the story, who the managers can se- 
cure information from will offer their 
services as ticket sellers, and report to 
the managers. 

The "picket action" by the managers 
may have been instigated through a 
statement made by Harry Mountford 
at the White Rats' meeting last week 
which said no managers or agents 
would be admitted to the White Rats' 
ball. Mountford included in the same 
statement that police would not be 
present as they were unnecessary since 
managers and agents would not be al- 
lowed in the halt 



WILLIE SOLAR RESTORED. 

"Good standing" has been placed 
opposite the name of Willie Solar in 
the offices of the Vaudeville Managers' 
Protective Association. Solar's name 
left the list three times within the 
past two months because of the alleged 
complaint- ho wae~ a -White Ret. •>>* 

This Mr. Solar has steadily denied. 
He says the next time anyone starts to 
draw him into an argument he's going 
to use a stage brace. Solar's agent, 
Harry Fitzgerald, worked the miracle 
the third time. 



BOSTON MASS MEETING. 

Boston, Feb. 7. 
Late this afternoon the White Rats 

issued hand bilir announcing a mas* 

meeting tomorrow (Thursday) tnight 

at Commercial Hall, to which only 
union people producing cards will be 
admitted. 

The speakers were announced on the 
bills as J. B. Williams, business agent 
of the Operators' Union; James W. 
FitzPatrick, president of the White 
Rats: Frances E. Gilmore, of the Rate; 
Geoffrey Whalen, local Rata; Harry 
Jennings, president Boston Central 
Labor Union; Martin T. Joyce; secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Massachusetts 
State branch of the A. F. of L.; Fred 
Dempsev of the local I. A. T. S. E. 
union; Nicholas Nally.of the Grievance 
Committee, local C. F. U.; Mabel Gil- 
lespie, secretary, Woman'a Trade 
League. 

The bills had not been but 10 min- 
utes before Messrs. Williams and 
Dempsey repudiated the nae of their 
names. Each stated he had had no. 
knowledge of the meeting, had not 
been asked to speak and kneif nothing^ 
about it 

It is authoritatively announced the 
stage hands, musicians and operators 
have firmly refused to become entan- 
gled by the Rats in their present Iron* 
ble and do not intend to be drawn Into 
it. Each of the three unions expect 
shortly to ask for a raise in their scale 
and will not take any chance of losinff 
the opportunity through a fight not ot 
their making. 

GORDON EXPLAINS STRIKE. 

Nathan R. Gordon, who operates the 
Boston theatres a White Rats strike 
was directed against Monday night* 
reached New York Wednesday morn- 
ing, stopping at the Hotel Astor. 

To a Vabibtt representative Mr. Gor- 
don stated that after the acts had 
walked out, some returned with a re- 
quest to be placed back in the bills* 
but that these requests were ignored. 

The audiences knew nothing of any 
trouble behind the stage, as the desert- 
ing acts had been immediately replaced. 

Monday and Tuesday at the Cordon 
theatres in Boston, said Mr. Gordon, 
the biggest attendance of the season 
resulted, but he did not attribute this 
to the publicity given the strike by the 
Boston papers. Mr. Gordon said he 
thought it was natural, for at Lynn 
Monday and Tuesday the Gordon thea- 
tres broke the house record in attend- 
ance, he added. 

Asked whether he contemplated 
changing his source of supply from the 
Sheedy agency to some other, Mr. Gor- 
don replied he had not yet thought 
about the booking connection, having 
come on to New York to personally 
learn of some matters he was curious 
about. 



V. M. P. A. MEETING. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation was held Tuesday at its New 
York offices. All the membership was 
represented, either in person or by 
proxy. 

The various committees reported. and 
a committee was .amed to look after 
the Chicago affair. 

The committee on membership re- 
ported there were not over twelve 
eligible managements in the country 
not belonging to the V. M. P. A. There 
was some discussion against new mem- 
bers being admitted, but this was laid 
upon the table until the next meeting. 

The Boston strike came up for gen- 
eral comment. 



rats; 4h&e£tor» resigns. 

V. P. Wormwood, a member of the 
Board of Directors of the White Rats. 
has resigned. 

If you doa't advartlM la VARIETY, 
don't advartiM. 






8 



VARIETY 



AMONG THE WOMEN 



BY THE SKIRT. 



New York's newest theatre, the 
Morosco, is a symphony of grays, buffs 
and purple. "Canary Cottage" was well 
chosen to open it. It is a good lively 
show. Many of the jokes are reminis- 
cent, but we are quite used to that on 
Broadway. Still the show keeps up a 
pace from start to finish and an even- 
ing's enjoyment is assured. The idea 
alone, a house party in the mountains 
with no chaperone, is enough to make 
one take notice. Of the principals, 
Trixie Friganza and Herbert Cortell 
provide the fun. Charles Ruggles is 
very nice as the young host. Reine 
Davies has been seen to better advan- 
tage, but she did very well with a slow 
moving role. Miss Davies in the first 
act wore a pink satin dress that was 
ruched at the hips. A chiffon throw 
was draped from one arm. In an 
orange number a yellow net had an 
orange panel. Dorothy Webb changed 
her clothes after each exit. Her pret- 
tiest dress was the first, a blue poplin 
made like a child's pinafore. The 
chorus was always sumptiously gown- 
ed. The "Canary Cottage" number 
was dressed in an effective gold and 
blue. Miss Friganza is wise in wear- 
ing red. It is so becoming. Her dress 
of red chiffon had bands of taffeta. A 
cherry laden bonnet looked good 
enough to eat. For Miss Friganza's ec- 
centric dance a flowered skirt enor- 
mously balooned ha^d a green bodice. 

Business wasn't bie at the Colonial 
Tuesday afternoon. Mae Nolan (with 
Paul Nolan) was dressed as a stage 
maid in short black satin dress and 
small embroidery apron. Donald Kerr 
and Erne Weston dance so well it is too 
bad they don't do only that. Miss 
Weston in the same clothes as last 
week scored with her high kicking. 
Mr. Kerr looked real well in evening 
clothes. Marshall Montgomery should 
take off some weight. An appearance 
is a ventriloquist's best asset. Mr. 
Montgomery had better look sharp. 
Edna Courtnay (with Mr. Montgom- 
ery) was carefully dressed in dark blue 
net over a pink petticoat. The bodice 
was of sequins. Helene Hamilton (with 
jack Barnes) was in a white silk made 
with a full skirt with settings of nich- 
ing. The bodice was of silver. A poke 
bonnet was worn and a parasol carried. 
Miss Hamilton seemed to enjoy the act 
much more than the audience did. 
Valerie Bergere's Japanese makeup is 
letter perfect. Freda Mueller in the 
Bergere sketch wore a white silk dress. 
She was a little artificial. Her Amer- 
ican twang was too obvious. 

The Palace show Monday passed off 
with but one casualty. That was an 
act called Bert and Betty Wheeler, who 
came in and went right out. The rest 
of the program was decidedly big time. 
Asahi and his troupe showed the last 
word in Japanese embroidery. Emily 
Wellman and her "Flash" sketch did 
even better this week than last. Bert 
Clark's latest Miss Hamilton lacks the 
cleverness of her predecessors. This 
"Miss Hamilton" appears in a flowered 
silk dress lacking style and taste. Far 
better was a ballet costume of white 
tulle. Mile. Dazie in a new ballet pan- 
tomime confirms that Dazie remains 
one of our cleverest toe dancers, and 
as a pantomimist is in a class all her 
own. In a child's room playing with 
dolls Dazie wears a dark blue pinafore. 
A dancing frock is of white brocade 
with a pink panelel front. A bewitch- 
ing ballet dress is in peacock blue satin 
cut in square scallops with pink Bounc- 
ings. A flowered horse shoe standing 
six feet tall was handed over with sev- 
eral smaller pieces. The fourth episode 
of "Patria" has Mrs. Castle in several 
bewitching cc-siumes. 

William Gillette in "A Successful 
Calamity," by Clare Kummer, pleased 
a large audience at the Booth theatre 
Monday evening. Miss Kummer ear- 



lier in the season £tve us a real 
tieat in "Good Gracious Annabelle" 
and again will Miss Kummer please 
New York with Mr. Gillette in this 
piece. The dailies always say the tired 
business man looks to the stage for a 
rest cure. But Miss Kummer proves a 
man can find it in his home if he ffoes 
about it in the right way. Estelle Win- 
wood as the young wife was adorably 
pretty in a gold neglige and a gray vel- 
vet frock oVer which hung a mantle of 
orange net Ruth Findlay's prettiest 
dress was worn in the last act It was 
a Scottish looking affair, having a plaid 
skirt plaited and a tiny black velvet 
jacket. 

For months to come all footsteps 
will be turned toward the Manhattan 
Opera House to see "The Wanderer." 
If you enjoy having your very heart 
moved, witness Nance O'Neil's moth- 
er. Miss O'Neil's scene in the third 
act will go down in history. Florence 
Reed was admirable in a decidedly 
catty role. Miss Reed's costume con- 
sisted of a skirt of shimmering gold 
over harem trousers. Miss Reed has 
acquired a thick waist line. Another 
of the cast whose work stands out is 
Beverly Sitgreaves. Miss Sitgreaves 
was attired in flowing robes of terra 
cotta color. Of the men William El- 
liot and James O'Neil are especially 
noticeable for fine work. 



Jane Cowl's "Lilac Time" at the Re- 
public is apropos of the times. It is a 
war play. The setting is a cottage in 
France near the firing lines. The sol- 
diers and officers in uniform make 
pretty stage pictures. Miss Cowl as 
the daughter of France has some happy 
moments. The final curtain finds her 
weeping and waving a baby's cap. 
Boiled down to 30 minutes "Lilac 
Time" would make a fine vaudeville 
sketch. The dressing is in the simplest 
style. 

The friends of William Courtleigh, 
especfally those who congregate at the 
Lambs, would probably hail with joy 
the spectacle of "Bill" steering a baby 
carriage in Central Park. This is ex- 
actly what could have been photo- 
graphed about four o'clock last Sunday. 

FIGURING WITH CHIC SALE. 

The United Booking Offices is figur- 
ing with Chic Sale to retain that char- 
acter player in vaudeville. Mr. Sale is 
under contract to appear for the Shu- 
berts. There is an offer before Sale 
also to join the Cocoanut Grove mid- 
night entertainment on the Century 
Roof. 

The vaudeville question is one of sal* 
ary, Sale asking 9500 a week for the 
big time, with the probability he will 
receive it, when, it is said, the Shuberts 
will release him from their agreement 
and the Cocoanut Grove offer will be 
declined. 

The week of Feb. 26 was to have 
been Sale's last for the present in vau- 
deville, if no further arrangement is 
entered into by him for that division. 



NEW ACTS. 

Lottie Williams has secured stage 
rights to "The Bowery Camille" from 
Valerie Bergere and will play it in 
vaudeville. 

Henry Chesterfield is preparing a new 
edition of "The Man Without a Coun- 
try." 

John B. Hymer in "Tom Walker in 
Dixie"; "The Question," with Sam 
Mann and Co. (Gordon fit North). 

Tom Carter and Dave Gordon pro- 
ducing a sketch with Snitz Moore. 

Mark. Sullivan 2rd Co. in * oraody 
sktftdt. 

Nat Fields and Jack Mainer in "Vau- 
deville A-La-Carte." (Lee Muckenfuss.) 

"Band Box Revue," all kids (Gus Ed- 
wards). 



PAY RETURN TRANSPORTATION. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

It has been decided by Judge Doyle 
in the action brought against H. Drake, 
manager of the Monogram Musical 
Comedy Co. by Lulu Cook for two 
weeks' salary, that a manager of a 
theatrical company taking a girl out of 
the city is obligated to pay her return 
transportation. 

Miss Cook left with the company 
from this point and was dismissed at 
Washington. She was given judgment 
for the full amount. 



I 



JOLSON OUT OF SHOW. 

Chicago. Feb. 7. 

Al Jolson was compelled to leave 
"Robinson Crusoe, Jr." Monday, suf- 
fering from a bad throat. He has been 
under the weather for several weeks. 
Jolson left for French Lick Springs 
to recuperate and will probably not 
return to the show until the end of the 
week. 

Announcement from the stage Mon- 
day that he was not in the performance 
resulted in some asking for a refund. 
Bert Dunlap, his understudy, and form- 
erly lightweight boxing champ in the 
navy, stepped in and gave a capital 
show. 

Sunday the "Crusoe" company was 
informed that the show would go to 
the coast. 

Jolson may return Friday night 
Business at the Garrick slumped badly 
during his absence. 

Bert Williams was out of the "Fol- 
lies" Monday and Tuesday, suffering 
from a stiff neck and jaw, but is ex- 
pected back tonight. His understudy, 
Chalmers, has been playing the role. 



"STYLE REVUE" TAKES. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

So great is the demand for seats by 
the public for the Spring Style Revue, 
which opened Monday at the Strand 
that the show may be extended another 
week so that ousiders may be accom- 
modated. The Chicago Manufacturers' 
Association is giving the show staged 
by Hamilton Coleman. Six night shows 
and two mats will be given during the 
week. 

The show has Knox Wilson, prin- 
cipal comedian; Frances Kennedy. 
Dunbar's White Hussars, Dancing 
Kennedys, Lorna .Doone Jackson, 
Lena Shaw, Mary Wood Hinman's 
Dancing Girls. The show was origin- 
ally planned for the Auditorium but 
the Hippodrome show engagement pre- 
vented. 



SHAPIRO-BERNSTEIN CHANGES. 

A general shake-up in the profes- 
sional staff of the Shapiro-Bernstein 
Music Publishing Co. took place this 
week, the most important point of 
which is the retirement of Harry Car- 
roll from the writing staff. 

Louis Bernstein decided not to re- 
new the Carroll contract, although Bal- 
lard MacDonald, who has been collab- 
orating with Carroll, is retained. In 
Carroll's place the firm engaged James 
Hanlev, who has supplied the S-B cata- 
log with a number of songs. 

Maurice Ritter and Billy Barr have 
resigned from the professional staff 
and Sig Bosley has been shifted from 
Chicago to the New York office, leav- 
ing Joe Bennett in charge of the west- 
ern stand. The Buffalo, Boston and 
Detroit offices remain unchanged. 



DARCY MAY RETURN. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Les Darcy and his show impresario, 
Freeman * Bernstein, reached town 
twelve hours behind scheduled time 
from Buffalo, the Australian fighter be- 
ing unable to open at the matinee at 
the Haymarket but reached the house 
at 10 p. m. The fighter talked about 
fiirtrtiug':.£xerc'V»es autd knock-'oui* aiid 
then went through a sparring exhibi- 
tion. 

If the Darcy troupe doesn't go on to 
Kansas City it will be taken back east 
by Bernstein. 



A "FRAMED" STRIKE 

Repeated assertions early in the week 
that the strike by the White Rats in 
Boston must have been framed through 
collusion with outside parties were 
borne out to some extent later by ad- 
vices from Boston, also Chicago. 

The Chicago information was that 

the Rats had decided to strike in Bos- 
ton upon being informed there was a 
prospect of the Gordon theatres leav- 
ing the Sheedy Agency to be booked 
-through the United Booking Offices in 
New York. 

The Boston advice is contained else- 
where in this issue, stating that the 
Gordon houses in the Boston suburbs 
booked by the Boston branch of the 
U. B. O. were not disturbed in the 
strike affair, leaving only the Gordon 
theatres booked by the Sheedy agency 
to become involved. 

Vaudeville people say that while the 
acts to be called out may not have 
been "planted" in the Gordon theatres 
for that very object, yet the matter 
looked quite too suspicious to be over- 
looked. 

Acts have stated since the strike that 
when looking for time in the Sheedy of- 
fice of late, if the Boston houses were 
mentioned in connection, they were 
asked if they were White Rats and if 
they had a Rats card. One act stating 
it had was told it could have the two 
weeks in the Gordon theatres. 

The booking men understanding is 
that Sheedy may have been of the im- 
pression he would lose the Gordon's 
bookings shortly and this belief may 
have been helped along through one of 
his booking men having seen Nathan 
Gordon at the Fifth Avenue recently. 
in company with a couple of United 
Booking Offices people. Gordon had 
not informed the Sheedy office he was 
in town and while the visit to the Fifth 
Avenue was incidental and as far at one 
of the U. B. O. men was concerned, 
purely accidental, the Sheedy emissary 
doubtless reported the occurrence to 
Sheedy. 

It is said Sheedy suggested to the 
Gordons at the time they were dicker- 
ing with Loew to start negotiations 
with the United. Sheedy's ground for 
reasoning was that Loew had opposi- 
tion houses in Boston while the U. B. 
O. could handle the Gordon theatres 
with Lest confusion. 

The Gordons are said to have opened 
communication with the U. B. O., bnt 
the agency informed the Gordons, to 
wait until this season passed as the 
United did not care to go into the mat- 
ter of further Boston bookings at that 
time. Later on the Gordons again took 
up the question but the United returned 
the same answer. The presence in 
New York some weeks afterward of 
the Gordon who was seen at the Fifth 
Avenue is said to have been brought 
about through Gordon wanting to know 
if the U. B. O. was then in a position 
to resume the subject He received 
the same answer according to report 
and dropped in that evening at the Fifth 
Avenue to see the show there before 
leaving for the train. 

Whether Mr. Gordon came to New 
York Wednesday to make another 
booking connection does not appear to 
be known in the inner vaudeville cir- 
cles, although the supposition seems to 
be that he did. 



DRAWS FAKERS AND SIDE SHOWS. 

New Orleans, Feb. 7. 
The city is full of fakers and side 
shows, here for the Mardi Gras that 
will end about Feb. 20. 



LOYAL CINCINNATIANS. 

Cincinnati, Feb. 7. 

Manager Ned Hastings, of Keith's, 
had the admonition, "Stand By Our 
President," thrown on the screen after. 
i\\c -pictures Monday ni^ht. Instantly 
hundreds of men and women were on 
their feet, cheering and waving their 
hands. 

And this is a hot-bed of German- 
Americanism, too! 



VARIETY 




Trad* Mark ftegittcred 
Published Weekly by 

VARIETY, Inc. 

Sime Silverman, President 
Square New York 

Advertising copy fpr current iisue will be 
accepted at the New York office up to Wednes- 
day night. 

Advertisements sent by mail should be ac- 
companied by remittance. 

SUBSCRIPTION 
Annual $4 Foreign $5 

Single copies, 10 cents. 

Entered as second-class matter December 22, 

1905, at the post office at New York, New York, 

under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



Vol. XLV. 



No. 11 



Jane Ware says she is in vaudeville 
only for the present. 

Ted Doner has left the Mazie King 
act. 

Paul Allen, formerly in the Fox of- 
fice, is now an agent 



CoL Fred Levy of Louisville has been 
in New York this week. 

Samuel Abrahams is engaged to mar- 
ry. Emeline Neusteter, a non-profes- 
sional. 

The Theatrical Treasurers are to hold 
a ball Saturday, April 21, at Palm 
Garden. 

France Demarest joined "The Fair 
Unknown" on two days' notice, replac- 
ing Daisy Irving. 

Selma Herman will return to the 
stage, having retired at the time of her 
mother's death last spring. 



Chas. H. Brooke has been appointed 
manager of the Wee & Reilly stock at 
the Mozart, Elmira. 

Robert Kelly is to leave "His Majes- 
ey Bunker Bean" and go to London 
with "Very Good Eddie/ 



»» 



The father of Olivia (Otto and Oliv- 
ia) died suddenly Feb. 2 in St Paul, 
Minn. 

The father of Leona Stephens died 
Jan. 27 at the home of his son, Le Rey 
Stephens, in Pittsburgh. 

William P. Carleton will leave the 
Anna Held show to become the lead- 
ing man with the Poli stock in Wash- 
ington, opening Feb. 19. 

Maurice L. Adler, for 12 years sales 
manager for Will Rossiter, the Chicago 
music publisher, hat transferred his 
allegiance to the Forster music house 
in the same city. 

Joe Santley and Ivy Sawyer are to 
be married in the spring, it has been 
announced in Philadelphia, where the 
couple are appearing in the Raymond 
Hitchcock show, "Betty." 



««i 



'Johnny Get Your Gun," which fol- 
lows "Seremonde" in the Criterion, has 
been taken over by the Realty Pro- 
ductions Co. (a newly formed com- 
pany). John Cort is no longer finan- 
cially interested in the piece. 



F. L. Ferguson's "20th Century 
Maids" will reopen Friday in West 
Hoboken. The same show played a 
on£-night stand route earlier in the sea-> 
son, but was taken off after the holi- 
days. ■ ■■•■ 

A special meeting of the Lights was 
held a few days ago and it was decided 
to reopen the clubhouse about May 1. 
The organization proposes to build a 
bathing beach near its clubhouse at 
Freeport, L. I. 

The act of Paterson, Fields and Mor- 
rison has split, Peterson and Morrison 
charging that Fields deserted them un- 
der unusual circumstances in New York 
last week. The two first mentioned say 
they have arranged a new turn. 



" ^Pccctdrt - Nsws" 'ifi -iSe" title oi- a 
readable weekly house sheet issued by 
the 5th Avenue, New York, and edited 
t>y "M. T. Noodle" to display the fol- 
lowing week's program, amidst some 
nteresting and humorous comment. 



Frank X. Breymaier has retired from 
the management of the Palace, Sche- 
nectady, N. Y., to act as assistant to 
Edward Klapp, who operates the Re- 
gent and Lyceum theatres in Amster- 
dam, N. Y 

The Chicago council judiciary com- 
mittee has recommended for passage an 
ordinance providing a $100 fine for 
anyone who plays, sings or otherwise 
renders "The Star Spangled Banner" 
except as an entire and separate com- 
position. 

"Seven Little Wives" is the title se- ' 
Iected for the play by Rida Johnson 
Young in which G. M. Anderson is to 
present Carter DeHaven and Flora 
Parker. Harry Tighe may be engaged 
for the principal comedy role if obtain- 
ing a release from the Anna Held show. 

Betty Washington says she was 
never a cabaret player in New York.] 
"Dec. 29," she says, "I played a single 
engagement for Mr. Bustanoby in his 
'Domino Room.' I was at that time 
playing at the Fifth Avenue theatre in 

vaudeville." 

_ 

Edward Bornhaupt was captain of 
the Belgian relief steamer. "Cenph- 
rates," torpedoed near the Belgian coast 
the other day. He is a brother of 
Charles Bornhaupt, the New York 
agent, who has been unable to secure 
any tidings of his brother. 

Francis X. Hope wants it understood 
that he is still a "regular city feller" 
and in town looking after the interests 
of Cohan & Harris, instead of being on 
tour as the manager of Madame Bern- 
hardt, as reported from New Orleans 
last week. Ike Hope is back with the 
Bernhardt company. 

At the Winter Garden last Sunday 
night the First New York Field Artil- 
lery Band was on the stape as an act 
At the ending of it, the biggest Amer- 
ican flag any New York stage has seen 
was unfurled behind the musicians 
while they played "The Star Spangled 
Banner." 

Neat week will find three "Fair and 
Warmers" playing three big towns, 
each for a run. The Chicago company 
has been there since August and will 
remain until April, another company 
opened in Boston at the Park Square 
theatre last Monday and the third com- 
pany opens in Philadelphia next Mon- 
day. 

The A. H. Woods office was called 
up by long distance from New Orleans 
Wednesday afternoon by the manager 
of the Julian Eltinge show, asking per- 
mission to raise the prices to $3 top for 
the remainder of the week. The show 
opened at the Tulane Sunday night to 
$i.$<KJ L.pl«e4 .to Jl.SQO Monday,, and, 
Tuesday -even'mf? the taking's were 
$1,900. This is the first time Eltinge 
has played New Orleans in four years 
and it looks like a $12,000 week at $2 
prices. The Woods office decided the 
prices were not to be increased. 



Croat) and JoaepMna are appearing 
on the Orpheum Circuit by permission 
of F. Ray Comstock. all billing so stat- 
ing. They were asked upon the clos- 
ing of "Go To It" to join "Very Good 
Eddie" but were allowed to play vaude- 
ville with the proviso they would join 
a new Comstock musical play to be 
produced late in the spring. 

M. 3. Bentham's boat, "Psyche V" 
is attached to the Naval Reserve, and 
Commodore Bentham has received or- 
ders to be in readiness. for a call within 
15 days. Rations for a crew of five 
for two weeks are ordered. If ordered 
into service the boat will carry a one- 
pounder. Among the crew will be 
Carlton Hoagland, Chester Stratton 
and Floyd Stoker, all having enlisted 
in the Reserve. 

Mrs. Geo. Choos, who was injured in 
an auto accident last week while taking 
the first ride in her husband's new car, 
is in the St Luke's Hospital, New 
York. One of her legs was broken 
in three places. It will be six months 
before she is recovered. Mr. Choos' 
mother was also in the car and is at 
the same hospital, with a broken wrist. 
The chauffeur was driving at the time, 
with the owner not in the car. 



A. G. Steiner, of the O'Brien, Male- 
vinsky & Driscoll law firm, secured the 
dismissal of the action last week in the 
New York City Court, brought against 
Oscar Lorraine by a young girl who 
asked $2,000 damages from the comedy 
violinist for alleged injuries by a car 
owned by him. Mr. Steiner secured 
the dismissal on the plea it was the 
girl's negligence which caused the ac- 
cident. Lorraine was not present in 
the court room at the time. He is 
playing in the south. 

The final severing of connections be- 
tween Isadora Duncan and her man- 
ager, Frederick Toy, was brought 
about this week with the payment of 
moneys held by Toy, as security to in- 
sure his release from theatre contracts 
made for the Duncan company this 
season. The Duncan tour was discon- 
tinued early this season when the dan- 
cer and Toy could not agree on the 
policy. Toy had a route for the show 
and held a share of the money due 
Miss Dnucan to protect himself should 
some of the theatres booked refuse to 
cancel the attraction. 

Gene Howard, a producer, who ad- 
vertised recently in an evening daily 
for people for a show to be known 
as "Howard's Merry Maids," disap- 
peared suddenly Friday last week from 

his headquarters at 230 West 36th 
street, where it was reported he left 
without paying his rent aud also that 
he had taken money from several ap- 
plicants under the pretense of giving 
them engagements. At the 36th street 
address this week it was said that sev- 
eral people had been looking for How- 
ard but up to date it had been impossi- 
ble to locate him and it was believed 
he had left the city. 

Sketches, in vaudeville, have ever 

been a cause of argument. We are 

very weary of reading letters asking 

what should be done with this sketch 

or that to whom may it be sent with 

safety, what vaudeville producers will 
accept sketches for productions, so on 
and what not. We sympathize, but we 
can't advise. So therefore this is the 
place for one answer to all and at the 
same time expresses our valueless opin- 
ion of the present vaudeville sketch 
and the present vaudeville sketch writ- 
-er. "• The 'mam fault or blame or almost 
criminal neglect may be laid directly 
against the recognized American 
dramatist. No matter how he may re- 
ply, what he may say, the blame still 
rests upon him. Just as moving pictures 



now do and will to a far greater degree 
to come offer its prosperous encircling 
arms to the dramatist, so did vaudeville 
—so does vaudeville. But there is a 
distinction between the play, scenario 
and sketch. The recognized American 
dramatist can write a sketch. He can 
write the best sketches vaudeville has 
ever had. Perhaps he has. But vaude- 
ville never saw them. That dramatist 
could write a vaudeville sketch, cast it 
with a fairly capable company and have 
it work, securing $100 weekly or less, 
hardly more, as his royalty, but he 
didn't and he wont. That sketch could 
play at least 30 weeks in a season on 
the big time and remain in that field 
for two seasons, anyway, with a couple 
or more seasons on the small time, at 
a weekly royalty there of $50 or $35 
for the author. The dramatist will re- 
ply this is theoretical; that he has gone 
into the same thing and it never came 
out that way. That's also his fault, for 
his neglect — almost criminal in fact, for 
it also worked against his own gross 
income — permitted a mob of "vaude- 
ville authors" to foist their "product" 
upon vaudevile until vaudeville could 
only believe a bad sketch good and 
wondered what a good sketch was all 
about when they saw one. Why the 
dramatist did not take up vaudeville 
was because when he finished what 
read like a corking playlet, and no 
doubt it was a corking playlet (don't 
make the mistake of believing these 
trained dramatists* can not write that 
sort of a sketch), the author said: 
"What, give that to vaudeville?" "Me!" 
"Vaudeville 1" "That's * Play," and 
"that" became a play, even if it were 
never produced. Perhaps several such 
were produced, maybe many playlets be- 
came plays in this way, but vaudeville 
lost them, for the dramatist could not 
bring himself to give whit he consid- 
ered a nossible play to vaudeville as a 
playlet. He would not believe in vaude- 
ville and vaudeville has been educated 
down, not up, in sketches. To those 
of us who drift about, seeing this 
sketch or that playlet, written by a 
"vaudeville author,' 7 it leaves a mighty 
poor impression of the vaudeville 
author with us, excepting in matters of 
comedy sketches. The latter are apart 
from this subject. By comedy sketches 
we don't mean comedies. Comedies go 
in with the dramatic playlets. We chal- 
lenge a contradiction of the statement 
that out of every 10 successful vaude- 
ville sketches, six or over that number 
are by authors unknown to vaudeville. 
We don't conclude sketches playing 
are necessarily successful ones and if 
the authors of such sketches wish to 
challenge the statement we will only 
too gladly go into that point for 
their benefit, the benefit of the man- 
agers and the vast army of sketch 
writers their useless though playing 
efforts have kept out. It's the play- 
ing sketch that discourages. An au- 
thor will comment to himself that 
if that's the stuff vaudeville wants, it 
isn't worth wasting his time. He's en- 
tirely correct. But it's not what vaude- 
ville wants. Vaudeville wants real 
playlets. Time has changed vaudeville 
into big time and small time. The dif- 
ference is as wide as the two names in- 
dicate. There have been some genu- 
inely written sketches of late in vaude- 
ville. There should be more. There 
are too many bad sketches being 
palmed off through the employment of 
vaudeville tricks. There is an income 
in vaudeville for a recognized dram- 
atist, one or more. They should take 
it up, and the other will follow, when 
the present hack that grinds there out 
from a mass of manuscripts he picks 
up at random, and never gives vaude- 
ville a real idea, will have to go to the 
small time, where he belongs, and in 
that way at least take the small time 
away from its awful blot of sketch- 
writing it is now enduring to place it 
on a par "-with "present" &k time vaude- 
ville, as far as sketches are concerned, 
and in this way give to vaudeville in its 
best theatres the playlet that should be 
there; gold — not dribble, and brains — 
not larceny. 



10 



LEGITIMATE, 




Nslll* Reyell makss tha appaaranos In Tha 
Century Girl" of Qraos Joaes, an artist's 
model who posed for tho painting "The Bong 
of Songs," the text for an inter eating article 
on the prevailing vogue in belles of the 
merry-merr/, showing that Century girls are 
picked for their fame in the studios rather 
than because of stag* experience. 

A dress rehearsal or press show of "Canary 
Cottage" was given at the new Morocco theatre 
last Sunday night Admission was by invi- 
tation only. The show opened Monday night 
for the public Other openings listed for Mon- 
day suggested the previous night display for 
the benefit of the critics. 



Charles Dillingham will giro a private per- 
formance at the Globe some Sunday afternoon 
this month. Only those connected with the 
New York Hippodrome will be present. These 
number 1,274. Receipts for the show will go 
to the Hippodrome Blck and auxiliary Red 
Cross funds. 

Bllsabeth Marbury announces her intention 
to produoe several American pieces In Paris 
next summer at the Theatre Famine, which Is 
operated by women. The productions are 
"Love o' Mike," "Very Good Eddie" and "No- 
body Home," In all of which Miss Marbury is 
interested. 



Wlllard Holcomb is back on Broadway hand- 
ling the press work for "Johnny Oct Tour 



Oun." Mr. Holoomb has been away from his 
familiars for several months doing special 
work for Washington newspapers. 

Clifton Crawford introduced a new number 
in "Her Soldier Boy" at the Astor theatre 
Monday entitled "Qlrls, Wonderful Girls," 
written by Augustus Barrett, leader of the 
orchestra of that playhouse. 

The first performance In this country of 
"Magic." by G. K. Chesterton, wUl be given 
at the Elliott Monday. On the same bill will 
be John Galsworthy's "The Little Man." 

PUSS OPINIONS. 



YeVre Im Lere. 

A musical comedy la two acts; book and 
lyrics by Otto Hauerbach and Edward Clark* 
music by Rudolph Friml. At the Casino. 

Threatens to be the winter's favorite In- 
door sport — Times. 

A happy compound of melody, nonsense, 
pretty girls and vaudeville. — World. 



A play in three acts by Jane Cowl and 
Jane Murfln. At the Republic. 

An Imitative and Intensely theatrical war 
play. — Times. 

A good acting play, and its well disguised 
but time-tried romantic episodes held the at- 
tention of its audience closely.— World. 

Canary Cottagfe. 

A musical farce In two acta and four scenes, 
book by Oliver Morocco and Elmer Harris, 
music and lyrics by Earl Carroll. At the 
Morocco theatre. 

It was the coming of this cook, Impersonated 
by Trizle Frlgansa, dangerously toward the 
close of a long first act, which proved to be the 
saving grace of "Cancry Cottage" and every- 
thing in it.— World. 

"Canary Cottage" Is rather a low form of 
entertainment, but it has the elements of 
popular success, and perhaps that Is all Mr. 
Morocco asks In this vale of tears. — Times. 

It is a spirited but overworked musical play, 
entitled "Canary Cottage" — a piece which la 
frequently blatant and Just aa frequently 
downright vulgar. It Is a grade or two above 
Mr. Morocco's "So Long Letty" in the social 
scale, but In general It la quite similar to that 
late attraction and will appeal to the aame 
public. — Tribune. 



A S 



fed Calamity. 



By Clare Kummer. At the Booth theatre. 
With Willam Gillette. Staged and presented 
by Arthur Hopkins. 

It waa a triumph for Clare Kummer — above 
all — Arthur Hopkins; Miss Kummer, who 
wrote this deft and diverting bit of high com- 
edy, and Mr. Hopkins, who gave it a produc- 
tion that comes as close to perfection aa the 
American stage ever does. — Times. 

A piece In a vein of humor which would be 
notable in any season in the New York the- 
atre. Coming fresh from the tournament of 
wit which her latest effort afforded, thia re- 
viewer, even with due caution, Is inclined to 
rank It foremost among all the comedlea by 
women produced^Tvere in the last four or five 
yea re. — World. V 

Miss Kummer also\shows an ability to reach 
up to the heights of comedy where the laugh 
Is tempered by Just the shadow of a sob. — 
7'.i\AiT.t. - • • 



Wilda Bennett and Joaeph Lartores ("Nina," 
new mualcal comedy). 

PeU Trenton ("His Majesty Bunker Bean"— 
replacing Robert Kelly). 

William Gaston ("Stop. Look, Listen"). 

Edward Baase ("Her Soldier Boy"). 

Robert Kelly ("Very Good Eddie"— Lon- 
don). 

Eugenia Campbell ("The Question"— Vau- 
deTuTa). 

Edna Archer Crawford (Stock— Toledo). 

Lois Swell (Shuberts). 

Bobby O'Neil ("Louisiana Lou"). 



SHOWS CLOSING. 

"In for the Night," produced by the 
Empire Producing Co., which doted 
at the Fulton Saturday, was tent to the 
storehouse. The piece played four 
weeks, the house having been rented. 

Boston, Feb. 7. 
The Cohan Revue will close its sea- 
son here at the Colonial Feb. 17, after 
four weeks. The show has beep play— 
ing practically continuously since it 
was first produced at the Astor in 
December, 1915. The company dis- 
bands after the Boston run. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 
"Arms and the Girl," the William 
Harris, Jr., production, closes here Sat- 
urday. Mr. Harris has Fay Bainter 
under a long; term contract and may 
present her m a new play late in the 
spring as a tryout for next season. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Margaret Anglin opens at the Black- 
stone Sunday in George C Tyler's pro- 
duction, "The Lioness," by Rupert 
Hughes, the play being based upon 
Gertrude Atherton's novel, "The Perch 
of the DeviL" This piece was tried 
out in Cincinnati last season under an- 
other name by Miss Anglin. 

"Arms and the Girl/ r after three 
weeks of disappointing business, will 
go back to New York to close, taking 
a week of one nighters on the way. - 

"A Full House" closed last week in 
Beaver Falls, Pa., when two members 
of the company left Salaries were 
paid in full, but owing to the with- 
drawal of the two principals it was de- 
cided to close the show. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

Margaret Mower (rejoins the Washington 
Square Players after playing as a member of 
Sarah Bernhardt's organisation). 



STROLLERS MOVING. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 
The Strollers are going to move 
from their present quarters in the Mer- 
cantile-Marine building but have not 
definitely decided just what site they 
wiir take. The Strollers have been in 
their present place for three years and 
are giving up their lease in order that 
another tenant may have the two floors 
in the building. 

JUDGMENTS. 

Judgments filed in the County Clerk's 
office. The first name is that of the 
judgment debtor, the second the judg- 
ment creditor, and the amount of the 
judgment. 
Willard Mack— J. F. Taylor, et al $1,- 

548.28. 
William Fox Amusement Co., Inc. — 

Continental Curtain Co., $332.91. 
Wilmer-Edelstein Amusement Co. — 

City of New York, $39.48. 
Wilmcr & Vincent — City of New York, 

$39.48. 
Leffler-Bratton Co. — City of New York, 

$81.93. 
Playwrights' Production Corp. — City 

of New York, $81.97. 
Theatre Ticket Coupon Co. — City of 

New York, $60.73. 
Joseph E. Howjrd^-W. R. Lindsay, 

$125.3* 
Maxim P. Lowe Producing Corp'n — 

Adler's Costumes, Inc., $581.56. 
Harry Von Tilzer & Manuscript Pro- 
ducing Co. — J. Newcombe, $95.15. 



PASSPORTS DELAY SAILING. 

Phillip Klein has been unable to ob- 
tain passports from the State Depart- 
ment for those engaged for Alfred 
Butt's London production of "Very 

Good Eddie," making it necessary 
for the company to postpone the 
scheduled sailing Feb. 17. 

The government officials have 
stopped issuing passports for European 
travel, but it is possible next week will 
see a rearrangement of international 
affairs to such an extent as to permit of 
actors going abroad. The company is 
being; held intact here until there is a 
definite development 

It is possible that a series of re- 
hearsals may be conducted in this 
country prior to the sailing. 

Dave Bennett, who is to stage the 
production, will have charge of the 
company. 

Mr. Klein looked at all four of the 
"Eddie" productions now in this coun- 
try and only offered three players' 
contracts for abroad. They were Bur- 
ford Hampden, Florence Earl and 
Jack Squires. 

Those that have been engaged for 
the London production include Robert 
Emmett Keane, Beth Franklyn, Mar 
Naudain, Gertrude Dallas, Robert Kel- 
ly and Helen Bond. 



INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

John Craig is to return to the Castle 
Square, Boston, late in the spring, to 
present the Harvard prize play of the 
year there. The play was written by 
Burford Hampden. 

"The Katzenjammer Kids" open on 
the International Circuit next week in 
St Louie. It is a Chicago production. 

The Gotham, Brooklyn, returned to 
the International this week with "Mutt 
and Jeff's Wedding." The house tried 
^tock for a week. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

When "Little Percy O' Moore" closed 
its International Circuit travels here 
Saturday the 20th Street Studio, slapped 
attachment proceedings Against Halton 
Powell's company for 1500, claiming it 
delivered scenery which had not been 
paid for. Powell claims the fountain 
set ordered, did not reach him in time 
for his opening and that he worked 
two nights himself getting his scenery 
in shape before taking to the road. 

"When A Girl Loves," which lost 
its Memphis engagement owing to 
Marcus Loew taking over the house 
there for vaudeville, filled in a week 
of one nighters, resuming its Inter- 
national tour at Birmingham. 

Harry Mack, manager of "Her Un- 
born Child," a week ahead of "In Old 
Kentucky," now on the Circuit, is 
nandling the advance for the latter 
show. Harry Le Mack is no longer 
connected with the "Kentucky" show. 

The Kate Elinore show has post- 
poned its closing date until Feb. 17 at 
Paterson, N. J. This week it is in Jer- 
sey City. 

"The Old Homestead" on the Inter- 
national closes Feb. 17 at the Lexing- 
ton. 



"EXCUSE ME" TO MUSIC 

Henry W. Savage is having a musi- 
cal version of his Pullman car farce, 
"Excuse Me," prepared for him. 

The role originally played by Willis 
P. Sweatman will be taken by a come- 
dian secured from the vaudeville ranks. 

Al. Herman and Dave Ferguson are 
under consideration for it 



CASEY SUES ERLANGER. 

Pat Casey has started a auit against 
A» L. Erlanger, of Klaw & Erlanger, 
through his attorneys, Prince & Nath- 
an, asking for $250,000, which Casey 
alleges is due to him for "services ren- 
dered, personal, confidential and pro- 
fessionally" for the period from 1908 to 
1916. 

In the summons and complaint Mr. 
Casey states that during those years 
he was under a contract to perform 
certain services for Erlanger and in 
recognition of the same he was from 
time to time given "a piece" of various 
shows. But ne never received any 
lonies for the services nor did he re- 
vive any of the profits, although 
Erlanger continued to "promise him." 

When the break between Erlanger 
and Casey came last year, the theatri- 
cal manager repudiated their contract 
and refused settlement 

The complaint alleges Erlanger real- 
ized $500,000 from "Daddy Long Legs," 
$250,000 from "Delphine* and $200,000 
from "The Argyle Case," in all of 
which Casey alleges an interest he 
never realized upon, also other produc- 
tions Erlanger had something to do 
with. The "dead ones" Erlanger let 
Pat into don't seem to have been men- 
tioned. 

The break between Casey and 
Erlanger, according to report at the 
time, came after Casey had gone to 
California on a special mission for 
Erlanger, accomplished the mission, 
only to find upon his return that 
Erlanger had wasted his time, when 
Casey is said to have "walked out" on 
Erlanger. 

STOCKS CLOSING. 

The stock company at the Fulton 
O. H., Lancaster, Pa., closed Feb. 10. 
The company recently had trouble 
with the local authorities due to their 

{presentation of "The Eternal Magda- 
ene." 

STOCKS OPENING. 

The stock at the Grand, Brooklyn, 
opened Monday in "Gamblers AIL" The 
company includes Mae Desmond, Rich- 
ard Buhler, Hazel Miller. Hayden Ste- 
venson, Dorothy Saddler. John T. 
Dwyer, Calvin Harris and Graham Vel- 
sey. William Postance is the director. 

The stock opening at Poli'a, Wash- 
ington, Feb. 19, will include W. P. Carl- 
ton, Florence Rittenhouse, Hugh 
Thompson. Bernard Thornton, Ralph 
Rennley, John Hammond Dailey, Har- 
die Meakin and' Edwin H. Curtis, di- 
rector. The opening will be "It Pays 
to Advertise." 

"CLINGING VINE" NEXT. 

The next musical production Oliver 
Morosco is to make will be "The Cling- 
ing Vine," by Morosco and Elmer Har- 
ris and music by Earl Carroll. The pro- 
duction will first be presented in Los 
Angeles some time in April. Julian Al- 
fred is leaving for the coast about 
March 1 to stage the production. 

Mr. Morosco also expects to try out 
three dramatic plays in Los Angeles 
within the next 12 weeks. Bertha 
Mann, at present there, will select the 
plays and Mr. Morosco will decide on 
the order of their production. 



MUSICAL STOCK. 
Marlborough, Mass„ Feb. 7. 
The National Amusement Co. will in- 
stall a musical stock at the local theatre 
opening Monday,. T^e pieces. will be, 
staged by Helen Conant "*ith Adrian 
Perrin putting on the musical numbers. 
The company was recruited in New 
York by Oily Logsdon. Two bills a 
week will be the policy. 



ACTRESS-MANAGER. 

Mme. Yorska is to enter the produc- 
tion field with a drama under her own 
management. She is at present re- 
hearsing a company at her private 
studio. 



ARLISS FOLLOWS WARFIELD. 

George Arliss with two plays, "The 
Professor's Love Story" and "Disraeli," 
•both revival*, i* to falksw- David War-- 
field in "The Music Master* at the 
Knickerbocker, Feb. 26. 

If yon don't advartiss sa VARIETY, 
- , t - 



, 






— ■ -. - »f 



L EG ITIMATL 



n 



SHOWS AT THE BOX OFFICE 

IN NEW YORK AND CHICAGO 



Big Theatrical Business in Big Cities. Several Hits in New 
York. Opinions Differ Over Prospects in Event of War 

With Germany. 



For years past there has been no 
theatrical season to equal the current 
one in attendance at the Jiigh priced 
legitimate attractions in the biggest cit- 
ies. The fall rush to the $2 shows con- 
tinues and though the top box office 
prices have mounted in many houses to 
$2.50, with the speculating price con- 
siderably beyond that for the choicest 
scats in several theatres, the theatrical 

fever has not abated. 

Broadway is full of theatres and 
plays, with more plays than theatres, 
although there are three new legit 
houses for New York now in prospect, 
with another having opened Monday, 
while others are "reported." There 
are more plays available for New York, 
however, than there are theatres, with 
a piece here and there being crowded 
out to make room for others sus- 
pected of better drawing powers, and 
there are some plays waiting to get a 
New York showing. The old Broad- 
way remark of "more theatres than 
shows" Isn't heard this season. 

Opinions on possible war with Ger- 
many and its effect on the theatre are 
not unanimous among the $2 mana- 
gers. Some say war will mean an 
enormous expenditure by the govern- 
ment, which will find its way in part 
to the box offices, with people wanting 
entertainment even more than they 
seem to just now. "The. other idea is 
that with trouble in sight, economy 
will again be practised and money with- 
drawn from circulation until the con- 
dition is similar to the first year of 
the war, with the picture houses 
through their low scales deriving the 
greater benefit. 

There are more theatres now doing 
over $10,000 weekly at the $2 or $2.50 
scale than at any time this season. 
Variety's estimate of last week's box 
office takings is as follows: 

"A Kiss for Cinderella" (Maude 
Adams) (7th week), $12,000. 

M A Successful Calamity" (William 
Gillette) (Booth) (1st week). Opened 
Monday. Looks like sure winner and 
another Arthur Hopkins success. Mr. 
Hopkins' other season's hit, "Goodness 
Gracious Annabelle," left the Republic 
last Saturday to a closing week of 
$7,200, and seemed good for about the 
remainder of the season had booking 
conditions not obliged the departure. 
The notices for the "Calamity" play 
were highly favorable and "The Times" 
was unusually complimentary to Mr. 
Hookins as a producer. 

"Big Show" (Hippodrome) (24th 
week). Annette Kellerman as special 
attraction replacing Pavlowa revived 
interest in the huge production and 
playhouse with the weeklv gross now 
between $40,000 and $45,000. 

"Capt. Kidd, Jr." (C. & H.) (14th 
week), $9,300. Business leaped last 
week and will go to $9,700 this week. 
Management docs not understand sud- 
den increase of interest but has called 
off incoming of "The Brat" and can- 
celed "Subway Circuit" dates for 
"Kidd." 

"Canary Cottage" (Morosco) (1st 
week). Opened Monday. Opinion di- 
vided with reviews calling piece rough. 
Civilians think it amusing. New 
■house* charging -£i.5(V 4^.- .-Cap? city 

1,000. 

"Century Girl" (Century) (15th 
week). The longer the run the strong- 
er the demand. $37,000 last week. 
Ticket rack always empty, with specu- 



lators securing as high premiums now 
as when Dillingham and Ziegfeld first 
produced the only hit the Century has 
ever held. List of stars makes per- 
formance look like a benefit to public. 
The Cocoanut Grove, atop the theater, 
put on by the same managers, also 
drawing capacity nightly, at $2, with 
the best dressed crowd in New York. 
"Ccption Shoals" (Nazimova) (Prin- 
cess) (5th week). Unquestioned hit 
but must move (without another thea- 
tre secured to Wednesday) to make 
room for f'Oh Boy" at same house Feb. 
19. "Ception Shoals" did $5,200 last 
week 

"Cheating Cheaters" (Eltinge) (27th 
week), $8,600. 

"Come Out of theTCitchen" (Cohan) 
(Ruth Chatterton) (Cohan) (16th 
week), $11,000. 

Gertrude Kingston (Elliott) (16th 
week). Fair business in small house. 

"Great Divide" (Lyceum) Revival. 
Opened Wednesday. 

"Harp of Life" (Laurette Taylor) 
(Globe) (9th week), $9,400. Oddity 
about this play drawing to orchestra 
and gallery with balcony light. 

"Her Soldier Boy" (Astor) (10th 
week), $15,000. Made possible by 
$2.50 scale. 

"Have a Heart" (Liberty), $10,000. 
Not considered a success. 

"If (Fulton) ' (1st week) opened 
Wednesday. Reported as lurid melo- 
drama of a by-gone type with some 
advance publicity secured through ref- ' 
erence to Japan. 

"Lilac Time" (Jane Cowl) (Republic) 
(1st week), opened Tuesday. Well 
liked and noticed. 

"Little Lady in Blue" (Frances 
Starr) (Belasco) (8th week), $9,900. 
Matinees exceeding night receipts. 

"The Lodger" (Bandbox) (4th week). 
Management claiming over $3,000 last 
week; estimated around $2,000. Man- 
agement's figures may be nearer cor- 
rect, as house has been rented for three 
weeks longer af"$750 weekly, as against 
$500 weekly paid for the first period of 
tenancy. 

"Love o* Mike" (Shubert) (14th 
week). About the best money maker 
in town for an ordinary sized theatre. 
Show musical, carrying 16 people, with 
no chorus and only eight of the prin- 
cipals receiving real salaries. $13,000 
last week. 

"Miss Springtime" (Amsterdam) 
(20th week), $12,000. 

'The Man Who Came Back" \( PI ay- 
house) (24th week), $10,900. Dropped 
to $7,000 around Xmas, but has come 
back, with hotels buving until March. 
"Music Master" (David War field) 
(Knickerbocker) (19th week), $14,000. 
Nearly all the sale has been at the box 
office window. Last week's announced 
lias brought heavy advance sale. 

"Nothing But the Truth" (William 
Collier) (Longacre) (22nd week), 
$9,300. 

"Old Lady 31" (Emma Dunn) (39th 
St.) (15th week). Has generally fooled 
the wiseacres. $6,400 last week (small 
house) and may run out the season. 

"Stremonda" (Julia Arthur) (Cri- 
terion) (6th week). Disappointing en- 
gagement. Leaves this week. "John- 
ny ( iet Your Gun" next week. 
"Show of Wonders" (Winter Gar- 
_ .'f/:ir> . X.l0t\\~ week).-,. .'Vvfragir.g a.r.uivp'1 
' ^'.O'O'.r, Very big. l'Jo'ihg "nearly af- 
ways capacity with balcony (small) off 
.somewhat as a rule. 

"Shirley Kaye" (Elsie Ferguson) 
(.Hudson) (7th week). Not accepted 



as hit although well thought of at com- 
mencement of engagement $8,400 last 
week 

"The 13th Chair" (48th St.) (12th 
week), $12,100. $2 matinee Thursday 
this week. $2.50 Saturday nights. 

'Turn to the Right" (Gaiety) (26th 
week), $10,500. 

"Upstairs and Down" (Cort) (20th 
week), $9,500. 

"The Wanderer" (Manhattan) (2nd 
week). Charged $1.50 top and can do 
$31,000 at that, scale. Will probably do 
$26,000 this Week. Opened Thursday 
night last week and sell out for second 
night with tickets scarce since. 

Washington Sq. Players (Comedy) 
(26th weelc). Nothing of account. 

'The Yellow Jacket" (Harris) (7th 
week), $5,300. 

"You're In Love" (Casino) (1st 
week). Opened Tuesday night. Came 
on Broadway with fair musical farce 
and weak cast, but received good no- 
tices. 

The theatres playing pictures stand 
about the same, with but a couple of 
changes. 

"A Daughter of the Gods" (Lyric). 
Leaving this week, with another of 
William Fox's feature film, "The Hon- 
or System" opening in same house 
Monday for a run. This is the 18th 
week for the Kellermann film at the 
Lyric. . 

"20,000 Leagues Under tha, Sea*. 
(Broadway). Still drawing big with 
plentv of energy being expended on its 
exploitation. 

"Enlighten Thy Children" (Park). 
Recently opened; $3,700 last week at 
moderate admission scale. Paying $2,- 
500 weekly rent for » 'theatre. State 
rights proposition. 

"Joan, the Woman" (44th Street). 
Reported averaging $8,400 weekfy. Tre- 
mendous advertising campaign being 
carried on for this special feature pic- 
ture. Last week $7,400, off through 
weather end of week. To remain 16 
weeks longer. 

Strand, with its weekly picture pro- 
gram, carrying bad feature this week in 
"Each to His Kind," a Lasky-Para- 
mount, with a Victor Moore comedy 
film saving the show. Business lipht 
early in the week. Strand making 
some successful play for patriotism. 

Rialto, with "Polly Redhead" (Blue- 
bird) doing its average, with slight drop 
Monday owing to weather. , Rialto 
steadily forcing attention to its splen- 
did picture program, in arrangement 
and otherwise. 

New York, with its pictures upstairs 
and down, changing features daily, goes 
along at a full gait that must reap a 
vast money return. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

As was expected all attractions with 
but one exception ("Arms and the 
Girl") played to big business last week, 
the auto show helping to push the al- 
ready remarkable business to its flood. 
A slump looked for this week occurred, 
the reaction being evident beginning 
Sunday night, with under-zero weather 
helping to keep people indoors. 

Two new shows bow into the legiti- 
mate field Sunday when "Katinka" 
leaves the Chicago to make way for 
Lew Fields in "Bosom Friends and 
"Arms and the Girl" exits for Mar- 
garet Anglin in "The Lioness." 

The surprise of the week was scored 
by William Hodge in "Fixing Sister" 
when $9,000 flowed through the win- 
dow at the Princess, not a large capac- 
ity house, but phenomenally big re- 
ceipts. 

The estimate for Chicago legit re- 
ceipts is as follows: 

"Robinson Crusoe, Jr." (Al Jolson) 
(Garrick). with a $3 top, close to $24,- 
. .000. .WiP,. he. y)^ ( vA-'kil in. lyso w^tks. 
by "Taking Show of IVhv' 

Zeigfeld's "Follies" (Illinois), around 
$22,000 last week. Leaves after next 
week to make wav for "Sybil." 

"Turn to the Right" (Grand), play- 



ing close to capacity. Last week near 
$13,000. 

"The Boomerang" (Powers) showed 
effects of reaction this week, but with 
the leaders last week, getting over. $14,- 
000. 

"Katinka" (return engagement) (Chi- 
cago), last week over $7,500, helped by 
auto crowds. Business slumped this 
week to a discouraging degree. The 
houscis against it. Did big at Garrick 
and could have remained there. Taking 
to road Saturday. Lew Field Sunday. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Cort) has rec- 
ord run of season so far. Another 
month yet. Got over $10,000 last week. 

"Arms and the Girl" (Blackstone) 
failed to draw. Handicapped by loca- 
tion. Less than $5,000 last week. Go- 
ing out Saturday. Margaret Anglin 
opens Sunday. 

"Fixing Sister" (William Hodge) 
(Princess), unusual strength, which 
compelled Lew Fields to open at the 
Chicago, although originally routed 
into the Princess. "Fixing Sister" got 
close to $9,000 last week. 

"Hip, Hip, Hooray" (Auditorium). 
Advance claimed bigger for this week, 
although business not what expected. 
Last week around $34,000, not compar- 
ing to business done in other western 
cities. Marked slump Sunday and Mon- 
day this week. 

"Intolerance" (film) (Colonial) doing 
excellent business and has gotten $12,- 
000 for two weeks past, with that figure 
beaten last week. 

Annette Kellermann in "A Daughter 
of the Gods" (film) (Studebaker) has 
not drawn up to expectations, although 
starting off very well. Last week 
around $7,800. Two dollar scale re- 
moved and $1 top installed. 

"Potash and Perlmutter in Society" 
(Olympic). Second week looks like 
a money maker with a steady draw. 






WEBER'S PASSING. 



Another metropolitan landmark in 
the way of a playhouse is to give way 
to a business structure. The old Web- 
er & Fields Music Hall at Broadway 
and 29th street, latterly known at (Joe) 
Weber's theatre, is to be torn down at 
once and a tall commercial structure 
will rise in its place. 

The ground has been purchased from 
the John J. White estate by a syndi- 
cate of real estate men, who will erect 
thereon a modern office building. 






ITS 'BREWSTER'S MILLIONS." 

The selection of the comedy to which 
music will be added for the production 
George M. Anderson intends starring 
Harry Fox is "Brewster's Millions" as 
the final choice. 

Grant Clark and Jean Schwartz are 
at work on the words and music. 
George Hobart will make the necessary 
adaptation of the book. 



SOUTH AFRICAN STOCK. 

A stock company at the Standard, 
Johannesburg, South Africa, will have, 
for its leading woman Florence Rob- 
erts, engaged in New York this week. 
Another engagement for the same com- 
pany is Anne Bradley. They will sail 
in about two weeks. 



"PALS FIRST" AGAIN. 

The j. Fred Zimmerman, Jr., produc- 
tion of "Pals First," tried out in Hart- 
ford a few weeks ago, was placed in 
rehearsal again this week with William 
Courtenay and Tom Wise as the stars. 

The only change in the cast will be 
the addition of Aurial Lee. 



LEADING MAN 3 PLAY. 

New Haven, Feb. 7. 

The lncal Poli stock will present a 
i:cw play 'm-rci'vCc'etc, vmt'lerf'b'y Charles 
Carver, the company's leading man. A 
special cast was selected this week. 

If you don't advortloo In VARIETY, 
don't advertlfOf 



12 



VARIITY 



ARTISTS' FORUM 



Confine letters to ISO words and write on one aide of paper only. 

Anonymous communications will not be printed. Name of writer must be aimed 
and will be held In strict confidence. If desired. , 

Letters to be published In this column roust be written exclusively to VARIETY*. 
Duplicated letters will nut be printed. The writer who duplicates a letter to the 
Forum, either before or after It appears here, will not be again permitted the priv- 
ileges of it 



New York, Feb. 2. 
Editor Variett: 

Variety said I received $12,000 or 
$13,000 from Charles Dillingham in set- 
tlement of my action against the New 
York Hippodrome. 

Kindly say I received $20,000 the full 
amount. Georges March. 

New York, Feb. 2. 
Editor Variety: 

In regard to Jolo's comment on our 
act at the 23rd Street last week, I 
should like to say he is mistaken in the 
statement there is a "new Dupree in 
the act" The trouble is that you and 
a few others appear to have my brother 
and the late Maida Dupree confused. 
I never met Miss Dupree. My brother 
and I resemble each other closely and 
he did do part of my old act, including 
the piano business, using our name. 
This confusion is embarrassing and I 
am tired of making contradictions. 

I have no "new Dupree." Miss Hol- 
loway of the Holloway family was prin- 
cipal dancer for Hengler in Europe 
and joined tnis act 11 years ago and is 
still with, it. 

0. C. Seymour, 
(Seymour and Dupree.) 

London, Jan. 10, 1£17. 
Editor Variety:— 

I note in Variety Dec. 29, 1916, that 
Senator Francis Murphy is offering 
odds of two to one he knows when the 
war will end or when peace will be 
declared. 

I will lay any amount at these odds 
and post the money with the Pall Mall 
Deposit and Forwarding Co., here, if 
he will put his money up with you or 
any reliable person that he can do noth- 
ing of the kind, and I will lay him odds 
of two one one up to $10,000 that he 
can't. 

Claude Golden, 



CAMP'S MUSICAL STOCK. 

Plattsburg, N. Y., Feb. 7. 

Plans are already under way for the 
military training camp for civilian sol- 
diers which according to report will 
open here April 15 instead of June 1 
as heretofore. 

Up. to the present time 50,000, men 
have signed to attend the camp during 
1917. 

The local business men and theatre 
owners are already making prepara- 
tions to handle the crowd. The Platts- 



burg theatre under the management of 
Connie J. Roe v has been temporarily 
closed for repairs, reopening April 9 
with "Watch Your Step" and will have 
musical stock during the camp season. 
Plattsburg experienced one of its 
most profitable summers during 1916 
on the strength of the citizen soldiers 
and the regulars stationed here who 
helped to keep the town booming. 



New Books for "Hello Girla." 
Will Roehm (Roehm & Richards) has 

been commissioned by Harry Hart to 

write a new book for the M Hello Girls" 

for next season. 

The show is at present playing on the 

American wheel under the direction of 

Lou Leaser. 



Craig Show Opening Postponed. 
The.Richy Craig show, "The Bur- 
lesquera," to have opened Feb. 12, has 
been postponed owing to the inability 
of the producer to get the company in 
shape. 

No Phone Judgment, Says Frazee. 
The judgment recorded in favor of 
the New York Telephone Co. against 
Harry^ H. Frazee is not against the 
theatrical and baseball manager of that 
same name, says Mr. Frazee, who is 
now in Boston. 



CAMPANINI'S CLEAN-OUT. 

Chicago, Feb. 7/ 
Campanini is making a clean-cut 
in the business and mechanical staff of 
the Auditorium. Bill Bairstow, con- 
nected with the big house since 1389 
(the year it was opened) and who suc- 
ceeded his father as master-mechanic, 
is not to be re-engaged. He has been 
the custodian of the enormous plant of 
scenery and costumes which the thea- 
tre has accumulated in 27 years of 
grand opera, and knows every stick 
and every inch of canvas and (very 
prop in the entire lot. Ralph Ed- 
munds, who served as press-agent of 
the recent season of opera, also is out. 
Why is not known. His successor is 
not named. 

The supposition, is that Campanini 
will fall back on the veteran, Charles 
Nixon, who has held the job in some 
sort of way through three seasons of 
discontent Nixon was engaged for 
the present season, but deposed to the 
job of deputy to Edmunds. Last sea- 
son, after having been let out to make 
room for Campanini's private secre- 
tary, Nixon was reinstated at the time 
the director and Frederick Donaghey 
had their famous row, which threatened 
for some weeks to end Campanini's 
Chicago career. He and Donaghey 
remain personal enemies, although the 
latter, as music-cfltic of the "Tribune," 
was in the season just ended as un- 
grudging of praise for Campanini s 
good performances as of blame for the 
bad ones. 

Ed Cordner, a son of the Cordner 
who for so many years was confidential 
secretary to A. L. Erlanger, also is 
among the missing in the new payroll 
of the Auditorium. He was engaged 
last season as a sort of assistant-man- 
ager of the house, after the with- 
drawal of Bernhard Ulrich, Guy Hardy 
and Donaghey from the management 



New York City, Jan/ 19. 
Editor Variety": 

I did not work with my No. 1 Cow- 
boy act at Globe, Philadelphia, this 
week. The act there was the Montana 
Minstrels, Bert LaMont and Cowboys 
laying oft the week. Bert La Mont. 

New York, Jan. 22. 
Editor Variett: 

I wish to contradict the statement 
of my former dancing partner in re- 
gard to breaking my contract Mr. 
A. B. Conkwrignt is his name. He 
wanted me to go to Buffalo for a month 
and I told him I wouldn't go. So he i 
asked me if I would not please go up 
with him for the opening night and 
I said I would go for one week, mean- 
time he to send for some one else to 
dance with because I had a better op- 
portunity in New York than Buffalo. 

I signed no contract with him or 
anybody else. I guess it hurts his 
dancing pride a little bit to have his 
dancing partner leave him, but it was 
his own fault and not mine. 

Agnes T. Dunne. 



Hip Raises Stage Hands' Scale. 

Charles Dillingham has increased 
the salaries of the stage hands at the 
Hippodrome from $2 to $2.25 a 
performance owing to the additional 
work necessary with the Annette Kel- 
lermann sets. 

The union scale is $2 a performance. 
Mr. Dillingham's advance was volun- 
tary. The higher rate is also paid at 
the Century- 



"NYUSA" OPENING. 

"Nyusa," a musical comedy by Les- 
lie Stuart and Cosmo Hamilton, which 
the Shuberts are producing, is to have 
its initial production in Toronto, Feb. 
19th. 



Savage's Second Company in Chicago. 
Henry W. Savage this week started 
recruiting a second compaify of "Have 
a Heart." The new company, which 
goes into rehearsal shortly, is slated 
for Chicago. 




IN AND OUT. 

Halligan and Sykes were snowbound 

in Iowa) from Saturday night until 

Monday, while en route from Des 

MoineV > V6 k Midheaporis:''''On the same 

train were three acts bound for the 

Empress, St Paul. The train carried 

no diner, the lights were out in the 

Pullman, with candles used instead, and 
it was 20 below. 

Bert and Betty Wheeler left the 
"No. 2" position at the Palace after 
the Monday matinee, replaced by 
Marshall Montgomery at the night 
performance, and Harry Ellis Tuesday 
for the remainder of the week. 

The northwest had storm trouble the 
early part of the week. Many acts 
were delayed, preventing them from 
opening. . Monday two acts each were 
reported short at the Orpheum, St. 
Paul, Minneapolis and Winnipeg. The 
latter Orpheum had no advance knowl- 
edge whether it could give a perform- 
ance Monday. The Minneapolis- Win- 
nipeg train had been abandoned on ac- 
count of the heavy snow fall. 

The Berry Sisters, owing. to sickness, 
were forced to withdraw from the Hip- 
podrome show, Chicago, last Friday. 
Bevan and Flint doubled for one show 
while Louis London did the same thing 
at another. 

Through illness Jack Wilson could 
not open at the Maryland, Baltimore, 
this week. Conley and Webb substi- 
tuted. 

Pleading inability to open at Keith's, 
Indianapolis, Sunday through being un- 
able to secure a plumber to turn off 
the water at their home in West Engle- 
wood, N. J., Brown and Spencer can- 
celed the Indianapolis engagement last 
Friday. 

Reed and Wood left the American 
bill the last half of last week through 
illness. Hoey and Smith secured the 
spot 

Loubowska could not open at the 
Royal Monday, illness. Toby Claude, 
William Smythe and Co. in "La Petite 
Revue" (same act Miss Claude ap- 
peared in before leaving for a'oroad) 
were substituted. 

Edwin George was out of the Majes- 
tic, Chicago, show Monday matinee, 
baggage being delayed. Valand Gamble 
doubled from the Palace. 

McCrea and Clegg's posing act quit 
the American, Chicago, Monday. 
Charles Ledegar substituted. 



SICK AND INJURED. 

Bessie Clayton, owing to illness, is 
at Long Branch to recuperate. The 
Clayton vaudeville act meantime is not 
playing. 

M. J. Needham, of "Tango Shoes," 
operated upon recently in Youngstown, 
O., while playing Keith's Hippodrome 
there, is recovering at his home, 1320 
North 11th street, Philadelphia. 

John Daly, at one time a member of 
the Dockstader, Primrose and West 
minstrel organization and one of the 
best known of the old school of 
dancers, is destitute and suffering from 
an advanced case of tuberculosis at 
Scton Hospital, Spuytcn Duyvil, N. Y. 

Gretta Tyson is in the Lakeside 
Hospital, Cleveland, recovering . from 
an attack of appendicitis. 

Margaret Farrel has postponed the 
opening of a new act, owing to receiv- 
ing an injury to her foot in a street 
accident. The doctors say she will 
not he able to use it for a month. 



FRANCES (Frankie) RICE 

New Protean Star 

Phenomenal Success at the Alhambra This Week (Feb. 5) 

EDWARD KELLER, Representative 



"LITTLE WIDOWS" TITLE. 

The tentative title of the Rida John- 
son Young-William Duncan piece to be 
produced by G. M. Anderson is "Seven 
Little Widows." It goes into rehearsal 
next week. Carter DcHaven and Flora 
Parker have been engaged, hue nego- 
tiations arc on with Jack Norworth, 
• kalp-h- I !cr>!, -Hr,; ry T»Vj.v j\\<<{; ;.?-thi'rv 

Norworth lias been retained at the 
Palace for a second week, and if he 
doesn't settle with Anderson for "Seven 
Little Widows," will accept another 
offer to be starred in a musical piece. 



VARIETY 



13 



ttmm 



CABARETS 



.•»»»•>..»>•-. • » 



>>>»■»<■>> ► 



"Tota" Marks opens with the cabaret 
at Rector's (downstairs) Monday. 

A revue produced by Lee Herrick 
opened Monday at the Hera'.d Square 
Hotel. 

The Plaza, Brooklyn, revue princi- 
pals opening that restaurant left it Sat- 
urday and will reopen with new chorus 
girls at the Pre-£atelan (Bustonaby's) 
on 39th street 

* 

The Lea Herrick revue at the St 
Charles Hotel, New Orleans, closes 
this Saturday. Raymond Wylie and 
Lucie Carter of the principals will re- 
turn to New York. 

San Diego is slowly swinging back 
into the cabaret column through some 
of the cabarets resuming. Some time 
ago a general license revocation spell 
shut down all of the local places of 
entertainment 

Healy'a is preparing the second edi- 
tion of its revue in the Golden Glades. 
Joseph C. Smith is staging it. There 
will be a score of special numbers writ- 
ten for the new edition by Joe Bur- 
rowes. 

Eddie Barclay, about as well known 
along Broadway as Times square, has 
taken N up the agency for Peiper-Heid- 
sick and will now give his whole at- 
tention to that excellent brand of 
champagne. 

The new Maxim's revue will be pro- 
duced by Percy Elkeles for that res- 
taurant Feb. IS. There will be six 
changes of costumes, 12 chorus girls 
and six principals: Barr Twins, Geor- 
~gette and Capitola, Ruth Hoyt, Martin 
Culhane. Maxim's will give New York 
its first Jugg Band Feb. 19. 

At the meeting Tuesday of the Res- 
taurateurs' Association, Thos. Healy, 
as a committee of one appointed to in- 
terview Commissioner of Licenses 
Bell regarding the operation of caba- 
ret shows, said that official had in- 
formed him he (Bell) intended to take 
no action against the cabarets unless 
the present New York laws were re- 
vised to permit him to do so. This 
was exactly the reverse of what Com- 
missioner Bell had informed a Variety 
representative a few days previously. 

M Iim Jam Jems" for February has 
its leading story dwelling in part upon 
Murray's on 42d street, and Woodman- 
sten Inn, a roadhouse up Pelham way. 
The story has interested the Broadway 
crowd, despite the lewd and brutal al- 
lusions the writer of the "J ems " maga- 
zine now so frequently indulges in. 
The story seems to have been given 
out by the woman in the case. Many 
Broad way ites profess to know both of 
the principal characters in the tale and 
there are many opinions expressed re- 
gaading each. 

Cabaret engagements by the Broad- 
way Booking Bureau this week included 
Alabasco (Jardin de Danse, Montreal) ; 
Olga Rossi (Hotel Rector, Montreal), 
Gash Sisters, Ruth Wells, Gossmann 
Twins (Rector's), Anna Green (Gar- 
den), Eva Perene (Marlborough), Dix- 
on and Dixon (Fleischman's, Buffalo), 
Romanoff and Dorothy Maltonia, Ar- 
thur Madden, Zella Clayton and the 
Joe Termini orchestra (Beaux Arts, 
Atlantic City), Gene White, Robina, 
Daiftty '• DiaVa, Bryan a"hd Carmen ana 
Versatile Sextet (Hotel Martinique, 
Atlantic City). 

A 50% discount allowed artists on 
meals in one restaurant was antedated 



by the restaurant man who sold a 
course meal for one dollar. Upon the 
artists receiving the half off ordering 
this meal, one-half the* courses on the 
menu were not delivered. As the treat- 
ment of artists usually tells of the prin- 
ciple under which a restaurant is oper- 
ated, those who follow the restaurant 
business would quickly predict this par- 
ticular cabaret will shortly either 
change hands or discontinue. The nar- 
row head that thought out this scheme 
was never reared for the restaurant 
business. 



Last night marked the advent of a 
new regime at Reisenweber's "Para- 
dise," the gathering place of the social 
elite that congregate at that establish- 
ment, which heretofore has been un- 
der the personal management of Mar- 
garet' Hawkesworth. Miss Hawkes- 
worth will remain in charge of the 
room, but under a guarantee from the 
proprietor of the building instead of 
paying a rent as previously. This guar- 
antee is said to be $850 weekly and in 
addition the restaurant people are to 
furnish the entertainment The latter 
will be under Gus Edwards' direction. 
The admission charge of a dollar is to 
be waived in the future and a couvert 
charge of the same amount will be 
made. 



' The United Booking Office* has or- 
dered reports made on restaurant per- 
formances, cabarets and revues. The 
work commenced last week, when a 
representative of the big time vaude- 
ville booking agency commenced fre- 
quenting the restaurants, jotting down 
his comment There are very few acts 
in cabarets not recruited from vaude- 
ville which would be of value in vaude- 
ville, excepting perhaps a girl or boy 
here and there who might be used as 
number leaders in "girl acts." Most 
of the restaurant people have been pay- 
ing quite some money for very poor 
material, probably because of their lack 
of confidence and being easily assured 
by plausible talkers that a show or re- 
vue can be put on cheaply. The U. B. 
O. only wishes to obtain a line on what 
the restaurants are using. The reports 
will probably be discontinued after the 
first batch are turned in. 



A meeting of representatives of the 
American Society of Composers, Au- 
thors and Publishers, the Hotel Men's 
Association and the Restauranteurs' 
Association was held Friday last week 
for the fixing of a scale of royalty pay- 
ments on copyright numbers controlled 
by the Composers' organization. It 
was made necessary through the recent 
decision handed down in the U. S. Su- 
preme Court The scale decided upon 
was. Orchestras of five pieces or less, 
$5 a month; up to 10 pieces, $10 month- 
ly, and above that number $15. All 
cabarets using the society's numbers 
will be taxed $15 monthly. The Com- 
posers' Society was represented by 
George Maxwell, Victor Herbert and 
Nathan Burkan (the latter the organ- 
ization's attorney). Manager Boomer 
of the McAlpin represented the Hotel 
Men, and John Cavanaugh the Res- 
tauranteurs. 



Reisenweber's now has two revues, 
one following the other at the final 
night performances. "Around the Cir- 
cle" (downstairs) ends about 12:50 and 
"The International Revue" in the 400 
clubroom upstairs starts at one. Gus 
Edwards produced both. "The Inter^ 
national Revue"- has eight girls (some 
from the show downstairs) and a 
couple of numbers leaders. One is Lil- 
lian Boardman. The choristers are the 
principal item upstairs. For the late 
hour entertainment they are given 



mostly "audience songs," which also 
serve as stalling numbers for time, one 
of the songs running about 15 minutes 
through each chorus girl allowed to 
sing a chorus. The 400 Club special- 
tics arc also there,- with Jonia, the Ha- 
waiian dancer, the principal act The 
other morning at 2:30 the 400 Club put 
on a youthful piano virtuoso, wearing an 
Eaton collar and trying to hold the 
crowd's attention at that hour with a 
solo. This must have been funny to 
some. In addition there is a Jaz Band. 
This "Jaz" thing, five pieces (the Reis- 
enweber's bunch being white) sounds 
like a trio of musicians trying to draw 
business to a side show. There is a pic- 
colo screech and a drum for prominence. 
It's what would be called stewed mu- 
sic," for you have to be feeling that 
way to like it. The players are in boob 
costumes. The 400 Club is placing a 
cover charge against all chairs* not or- 
dering food. 

San Francisco cabarets are at pres- 
ent under a severe vice crusade and ad- 
hering closely to existing regulations, 
although it is rumored many of the lo- 
cal places known the country over will 
in time feel the lid now coming down 
upon them through the Chief of Police 
and the Mayor issuing statement do- 
ing away with certain privileges for- 
merly allowed, and giving out new 
regulations. Many of the downtown 
establishments of all classes are being 
watched closely, with the crusaders 
personally investigating many evils ex- 
isting and framing for stunts to be 
done in their presence. It is expected 
everything will be well under the guid- 
ance of the crusaders within another 
week. All Frisco cabarets are feeling 
the effect Establishments are pretty 
well emptied long before closing hour. 
The chorus girls attend strictly to 
their work and depart immediately 
upon the closing number. Rev. Paul 
Smith, head of the reform movement, 
held a meeting and upon clearing the 
hall a picture was taken of the so- 




called "entertainers," to be exhibited 
with the lecture upon the subject All 
the dailies are behind the crusade. 
Many of the establishments may close 
during this crusade, for it is said it is 

without doubt the strongest' move of 

its kind ever started on the Coast 
Cabarets and restaurants are the real 
life of Frisco, and were allowed to run 
wide open at one time. The one de- 
sire is to rid the places of "box stalls," 
where drinks are served to those de- 
siring a secluded spot. Another new 
regulation concerns dancing privileges, 
giving the cafes licenses to dance in 
the evening only, barring unescorted 
women from entering at night, and the 
doing away of female entertainers and 
employes mingling with guests; also 
females under age. Flirtation is pro- 
hibited amongst guests, with no intro- 
duction to be made of men and women 
patrons by employes. 

Reisenweber's at Columbus circle has 
made itself the center of an agency tem- 
pest through ignoring Charles Bom- 
haupt in the renewal of the restaurant's 
engagement of Jonia and Sister, the 
Hawaiian dancers. Reisenweber's, un- 
consciously or otherwise, appears to 
have fallen into the engagement line 
that in 4 the past has discredited several 
theatrical managers through similar 
tactics. Cabarets at present demand 
novelties* for its floors. . Theatrical 
agents are best trained to secure these 
and expect to be protected by the res- 
taurant proprietors even if the agent 
does not protect himself. The res- 
taurants that handle the agent in the 
accepted ethical manner of that calling 
will be the ones to get first call on new 
material. Those that do not will have 
to take what is left, for it is the agent 
who procures the act for the cabaret 
The restaurant man doesn't know 
enough about show husiness to. make 
up his own mind about any attraction, 
without assurance from the act's repre- 
sentative. The Reisenweber action is 
peculiarly reprehensible since Born* 
haupt gave it the very attraction it 
needed in Jonia, after Bornhaupt had 
brought the girl and her family East, 
besides spending quite some money to 
exploit her. She is under age. This 
may be the defense if Bornhaupt*s 
threatened suit for $50,000 damages , 
• comes to trial, but BornhauptY con- 
tract with Jonia has the endorsement 
of the girl's father and mother, her nat- 
ural guardians. The parents also par- 
ticipate in her earnings, the father (with 
two sons) playing in the fou^-piece 
Hawaiian orchestra accompanying the 
girl, and the mother (Mrs. Shaw) is 
manager of the. act. Bornhaupt's con- 
tract .with Jonia and Sister was for 
one year. He placed her for four weeks 
at Reisenweber's, ending last Saturday. 
Last week Reisenweber's informed 
Bornhaupt by letter Jonia would not be 
wanted on the optional clause held by 
the restaurant after the first four weeks 
expired. Bornhaupt thereupon placed 
the Jonia Hawaiian group to travel 
with the Anna Held show, at $400 week- 
ly, with no transportation. Friday he 
learned Jonia had agreed to remain 
over at Reisenweber's without Born- 
haupt's knowledge or consent, and that 
she had renounced the Bornhaupt con- 
tract. 



bTLLT JEWELL" and' ELSA MOST 

"Principally among the cast of Menlo Moore's 

iOY RIDERS are BILLY NEWELL and ELSA 
lOST; the latter's charming contralto, peppery 
personality, ability to dance, and the former's 
acceptable manner of getting numbers across, 
mean the success of the act."— Columbus (Ohio) 
"Dispatch." 



SHIFTING PRINCIPALS. 

Buffalo, Feb. 7. 

The principals of the burlesque stock 
at the Garden headed by Leo Stevens, 
who came here from the Union Square, 
New York, will be shifted from this city 
to the Haymarket, Chicago, at the com- 
pletion of their four weeks' engage- 
ment. The Haymarket people will 
come to the Garden. Four-week shifts 
will be followed for the remainder of 
the season. The managers of the 
Jvrm.sos decivlcrt tha-l it w.vdlil/'/e -tan ex- 
pensive to shift both companies, but the 
changing of principals would be suffi- 
cient. 



If you don't advertise In VARIETY, 
don't advertise. 



a " ~"~*~* — — — — - ~« 



"V^ArR^E^TY 



ae 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (FEBRUARY 12) 



In Vi 

(All k*«Mi aaaa for the week wltk Meadsy aba! - 
Tkeetree Hated as "Ot»k— » withont Any rartaar 
Otrabftnai Clranit. TWtrae with m B-CT ..aM"4?1*«T Jails. 
tke lalhvaa-Coaaintae ftJauatoa Beokiag C— pssy Ores 

Aa^ies boohiag tka hMM art noted »7 stagfe ■*••«■' «■**•]•. «Mh M "OraV Ornaeasi 

V« A.-_WwunrVA^ 1 vOU Ifeaagors' a ^^ 

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(nenaUy "lAipriAQ act — 



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sMagtArAngA W. V. M. A.>— "MA," »WA Ctrcait— "M V." VkAAA-VWllACI 

SPECIAL NOTICSi The sunner in wkick tkAAA bills axe Aviate] 4AAAMt 



tivA lAiAArtAACA ef Arte aer their pvograas pOAitient, The ksste la wkick 
prevents say Attention being given these matters. 



laaleate the reU- 

tkA MllA ATA gAtkATW 



New Y«rk 

PALACE (orph) 

Mclntyre ft Heath 

Q race La Rue 

Jack Norwortk 

World Dancers 

Clark ft Verdi 

"Sport* tn Alps" 

"Patria" (film) 

(One to All) ._ v 

COLONIAL tubo) 

Eta Tanguay 

Bert Baker Co 

Harry Carroll 

Rockwell ft Wood 
Antrim 8ulllvAn Co 
Steindel Bros 
Raymond Wilbert 

ALHAMBRA (ubo) 
Evelyn Nesbttt Co 

Howard ft Clark 
Hugh Herbert Co 
/ChAA Abeam Co 
Oeo Roesner 
foe Towle 
Kerr A Weston 
Nolan ft Nolan 

ROYAL (ubo) 
Valerie Bergere Co 
Dunbar's Darkles 
Moore ft Haagar 
M ft B Hart 
Rowley ft Young 
Inglls ft Reading 
Kenny ft Lusby 
Musical Johnsons 

RIVERSIDE (ubo) 
Bradley ft Ardlne 
Chas Oloott 
Moon ft MorrlA 
Nat C Goodwin 
Mme Doree Co 
Fay Templeton 
Wm Oaxton Co 
Belle Baker 

H O H (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Kelly ft Pollack 
Great Howard 
Happy J Gardner 
Oriental Follies 
Holden ft Herron 

1st hAlf (12-14) 
Dorothy ft Antoinette 
Brown ft TAylor 
Simpson ft Dean 
Loney Haskell 
Imp Bicycle S 
(Two to fill) 

2d helf (15-18) 
Bob Tip ft Co 
Maude Leon Co 
Does 
Van Haughton ft • 

Sb liner 
(Two to fill) 

5TH AVE (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
"Dog Watch" 
V Hamp'n ft Schriner 
Crelghton Belm't ft 
Jack George 
Vera Berlin 

12&TH ST (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Holiday Dream 
8 Vagrants 
Ed Farrell Co 
MillettA 

1st half (12-14) 
Juggling DeLlsle 
Tracey ft McBiide 
M Freeman Co 
Jobn Dunsmore 
Morris ft Allen 
Lady Alice's Pets 
(One to fill) 

2d balf (15-18) 
Maxlne Bros 
L Kelly Co 
Savannah A Ga 
4 Earls 
(Throe to fill) 

81 ST ST. (ubo) 
Walsh A Brother 
Kramer A Kent 
Jos E Remand Co 
Wm Morrlsey Co 
(One to All) 

2d hair 
"Fascination" 
Maybelle Best 
Morris A Allen 
"Wanted— A Wife" 
(One to fill) 

BOTH ST (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Al Lawrence 
10 Dark Nights 
Hennlngs 

Morley & McCarthy 
Sidney A Townley 

2HD ST (ubo) 
2d half (S-ll) 

T\mh (*]•! i ••n 

• \M|1d"£ rk'ftiltrd 

Scretty & Antuiiw Ite 
Von & Carry Avery 
NAT WIN OAR (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
2 Mermaids 



Tbeo ft DAndlAA 
Lnwton 
Lerner ft Ward 

AMERICAN (loew) 
Carbray Broa 
Gllson ft DeMott 
KlmiwA Tr 
Kathryn Mlley 
Doris Lester 8 
Hendrlx ft Padula 
"Maids df Japan" 
The Lelands 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
McAvoy ft Brooks 
Fraternity 4 
Billy Dale Co 
Cronln's Merry Men 
Laughlln ft West 
BVery Men 'a 81a 
C ft M Cleveland 
LAypo ft BenjAmln 
(One to fill) 

LINCOLN (loew) 
Alice Cole 
Ward ft Faye 
"Criminal" 
Gould ft Lewis 
Josephus Tr 
(One to fill) 

2d hAlf 
Brandt ft Aubrey 
Tl Ling Sing 
D ft M Foster 
"Maids of Japan" 
Chase ft LaTour 
O Lowlandler Go 

TTH AVE (loew) 
Swain's Animals 
Laughlln ft West 
B ft M Foster 
Harry Coleman 
Red Fox Trot 
Welch Mealy M 
2d half 
Alice Cole 
Ward ft Faye 
"Criminal** 
Mack ft Vincent 
(Two to fill) 

GREELEY (loew) 
2 Georges 
Howard ft Hurst 
Morris ft Miller 
Tl Ling Sing 
Storm ft Marsden 
Mack ft Vincent 
O Lowandler Co 

2d half 
Grey ft Klunker 
Sandy Shaw 
Salvation Sue • 

Polly Prim 
F1v!ng Mlllettes 
(Two to All) 

DELANCET (loew) 
Selden ft Bradford 
Fred's Pigs 
Elsie White 
McCloud ft Karp 
Joe Davltt Co 
Ovel Sisters 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
DeArmo ft Marguerite 
Sorority Girls 
Roberts Stuart ft R 
Tlemey 4 
Soldier's Wife 
Florence Rayfleld 
(Two to fill) 

NATIONAL (loew) 
Reno 

O'Neill Sisters 
Mullen ft Rogers 
Salvation Sue 
Bell Boy 3 
Tree's Hawaiian Duo 

2d balf 
The Lelands 
Oil son A DeMott 
Plelson A Rose 
Jessie Haywood Co 
Laurie Ordway 
Welch Mealy A M 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Rich A Clegg 
McAvoy A Brooks 
Laypo A Benjamin 
Billy Dale Co 
L Wolfe Gilbert 
Every Man's 81s 
Tolly Prim 
(One to till) 

2d balf 
HnrrlnRton A Lamster 
Crlndell ft Esther 
Kimlwa Japs 
Covrnv ft Woodrow 
Elflo White 
Ftorm ft Mnrsdon 
Thnhnt A Dixon 
pTvnln'" Aniiiiuis 
!'.'>V1.KVAH':> I io>W; 
Wiibur Sweatniaii 
Ben A Hazel Mann 
Fraternity 4 
Wllllamn A Spiral 
Faaci. *\tlng Flirts 



2d half 
Rich A Clegg 
Lee's Hawaiian Duo 
Clinton ft Rooney 
Leonard ft Anderson 
L Wolfe Gilbert 

AVE B (loew) 
Clinton ft Rooney 
Murray Bennett 
"Wedding Party" 
(Two to fill) 

2d balf 
B J Moore 
Hoey ft Lee 
Borslnl Tr 
(Two to fill) 

Brooklyn) 

ORPHEUM (buo) 
Rock ft White 
Jaa B Canon Co 
Creation 
Jaa Curson Co 
Grace De Mar 
Dyer ft FA/e 
Adams ft Murray 
Flavllla 
Lucy Valmont Co 

BUSHWICK (ubo) 
"Peacock Alley'^ 
Jack Wilson Co 
Gallager ft Lewis 
McCarty A Faye 
Grace De Mar 
Frank Mullane 
Boudlnl Bros 
Herbert's Dogs 
PROSPECT (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
Bell ft Eva 
Billy K Wells 
Great Howard 
Gladiators 
Jack Wilson 
Genaro ft Gould 

1st half (12-14) 
4 Earls 
Larry Kelly Co 
Savannab ft Georgia 
Roy ft Royce 
(Two to fill) 
GREENPOINT (ubo) 

1st half (12-14) 
Maud Ryan 
Great Howard 
Carrie DeMar Co 
H ft B Puck 
(Four to fill. 

HALSEY (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
Marlon Saunders 
Raymo ft Hoyt 
"All Wrong" 
Mme Herman 
Frivolity GlrlA 

BIJOU (loew) 
DeArmo ft Marguerite 
Lee Tong Foo 
Sorority GlrlA 
Grlndell ft Esther 
Leonsrd ft Anderson 
Tlerney 4 

2d hAlf 
Howard ft Hurst 
Ben ft Hasel Mann 
Doris Lester 8 
McCloud ft Karp 
Valdare Tr 
(One to fill) 

DE KALB (loew) 
Cooper ft Hartman 
Hall Ellsworth M 
Mabel Harper 
Roberts 8tewart R 
Nat Carr 
Flying Mlllettes 

2d half 
Reno 

O'Neill Sisters 
Mullen A Rogers 
Burke A Burke 
Bell Boy 3 
Fascinating Flirts 

PALACE (loew) 
E J Moore 
Walter Perclval Co 
Hoey A Lee 
"In Monkeylaad" 
(One to All) 

2d half 
"Wedding Party" 
Josephus Tr 
(Two to fill) 

FULTON (loew) 
Brandt A Aubrey 
Chase A LaTour 
Soldier's Wife 
Laurie Ordway 
Pealson A Rose 
2d half 
White Mullaly A W 
Morris A Miller 
Foster A Ferguson 
J..,- Davltt Cu 
■Sr t t f'.iri' 
Frv:!"* rips 

WARWICK (loew) 
Burke ft Burke 
Borslnl Tr 
(Two to fill) 



2d half 
General Orders 
"In Monkeyland" 
(One to fill) 

Aberdeen* 8. D. 

BIJOU (abc) 
(12-13) 



Anetln, Tax. 

MAJESTIC (Inter) 

(12-18) 
(SAme bill playing 
Waco 14-15 and 
Ft Worth 16-18) 
ThA Norvslls 
Bernard ft Scarth 
Glbsotf A Guiiittii 
, Kajlyama 
"CrAnberrlea" 
A ft F Stedman 
DeWltt Burns ft T 

Baltimore. Ma. 

MARYLAND (ubc) 
E Ann Wellman Co 
Brlce ft King 
Jas J Morton 
Leipzig 

Bonlta ft Hearn 
Edna Aug 
Bowman Bros 
Rath Bros 
Cath Powell Co 
HIP (loew) 



Kathleen Kla Wah Ya Corne u a a/ Adele 



Prevett Merrill Co 
Davis A Moore 

Albany. N. T. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
Noack 
Fin A Fin 
"Jasper" 
E Conlgan Co 
Donovan A Lee 
Toots Pake Co 
2d half 
The Peers 
Jack Marley 
Three Sullys 
Sam Mann Co 
3 Hlckey Bros 
Melody Six 

Allentown, Pa. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
2d half (15-17) 
Cooper A Ricardo 
Ethel M Hall Co 
"Fireside Reverie" 
(Two to fill) 

Altoonn, Pa. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Marlon HarrlA 
Fred Ardatb Co 
(Three to fill) 
2d balf 
Greta Von Bergen 
Lee ft Bennett 
Fox ft Ward 
Booth ft Leander 
(One to fill) 

Atlanta, Ga. 

FORSYTHE (ubo) 
3 Bobs 



Rice ft Francis 
Archer ft Belford 
Jimmy Lyons 
Mercedes Clark Co 
Percy Pollock Co 
Zlta Lyons 

Battle Creole Mick. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Sunday only, 11th) 
Arnold A Florence 
Darn Good A F 
Dae ft Neville 
Patricola ft Meyera 
"Song ft Dance Rev" 

2d half 
"Frat Boys ft Girls" 

Bar City. Mica. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Sundny opening) 
"Frat Boys ft Girls" 

2d hAlf 
Pictures 

Belolt, ^Vla. 

WILSON (wva) 
2d half (15-17) 

Dawn June 

Hayes A Neal 

Lew Hoffman 

"Check Baggage" 

Blnananaton. If. T. 

8T0NB S (ubo) 
Blsnche Sloan 
Welton ft Marshall 
Goelet Harris a M 

2d bslf 
Murphy ft Klein 
Princeton 5 
(One to fill) 



AMI 



THE CORNELL 



114-llf 




Schoen ft Mayne 
J C Nugent Co 
Walter Brower 
Evan B Fontaine 
Beeman ft Erson 
(One to fill) 

RIALTO (ubo) 
(Macon split) 
1st balf 
Hayes A Rives 
Dolce Sisters 
Fred Hagen Co 
Antonio 3 
(One to fill) 

H (loew) 
Maestro 

Howard ft Sadler 
Vlollnl 
Mimic World 

Amsterdam. N. T. 

LYCEUM (ubo) 
T ft S Moore 
Fields ft Bernle 
Flying Venus 

2d hslf 
Montrose ft Allen 
Eugenie Le Blano 
"Carnival Girl" 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
1st balf (12-14) 
Arnold A Florence 
Darn Good A F 
Dae A Neville 
Patricola A Meyers 
"Song A Dance Rev" 

Applet on, Wt«. 

BIJOU (wva) 
Teddy A May 
Oden A Holland 

2d half 
Hoey Scott A B 
(One to nil) 

Anhnrn, N. Y. 
JEFFERSON (ubo) 
Eugenie Le Blanc 
"Carnival Clrl" 
Montrose A Allen 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Noha A Philips 
Juno Palmo 
C, Mllllngton Co 
"Harvest Dnvs" 



Birmingham. Ala. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Nashville split) 
1st half 
Leonardl 

Kttne Hansley ft McK 
Will Ward A Girls 
Allen A Howard Co 
Fred Bowers Co 

Boston 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Adelaide A Hughes 
Wilfred Clarke Co 
8tuart Barnes 
Florrle Millershlp 
Hunting A Francis 
Will Oakland Co 
Harris A Manion 
Lobse A Sterling 

ORPHEUM (loew) 
Winchester ft Clare 
Harry First Co 
Beulah Pearl 
Will ft Mary Rogers 
Gliding O'Mearas 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Greno A Piatt 
3 Crelghton Girls 
Gray A Graham 
Brown A Barrows 
"Evil Hour" 
Clark A McCullough 
(One to Oil) 
ST JAMES (loew) 

3 Crelghton Girls 
Brown A Barrows 
Frank Whlttler Co 
Lillian Watson 
Llplnskl's Dogs 

2d half 
Reed A Wright 
Dr Joy's Sanitarium 
Lew Hawkins 
EqulIIo Bros 
(One to fill) 

nrldnreport. Conn. 

POLl'S (ubo) 
Skelly & Bauvain 

4 Frollrkers 
The Intruder 
Karl Ernvs Pets 

2d half 
Casettl A Rydell 
V * (' Avery 



TOM 



BTMaX 



KENNEDY and BURT 



Ed Blondell Co 
Foroe A Williams 
Cabaret Girl 

PLAZA (ubo) 
Fall ft Fall 
"Immigrant" 
El Coto 
Capt Kid Ashore 

2d half 
Lucoty ft Costello 
Hlbbert ft Nugent 
"Girl from Amst" 
(One to fill) 

Boffalo, H. T. 

SHEA'S (Ubo) 
Cal Boys Band 
Stone ft Kallas 
Arthur Deagon 
McSbane A Hathaway > 
Nelson Waring 
Alex Bros 
4 Melllos 
(One to fill) 

OLYMPIC (sun) 
Zara Carmen 8 
Wellington 4 
Mabel Page Co 
Seymour A WilliamA 
"Lover Lake" 

LYRIC (sun) 
Arnold ft PAgA 
Texioo 

Chss Husted Co 
Pspello 
(One to fill) 

Botrev Mont. 

PANTAGES (p) 
(16-21) 
Maboney ft Auburn 
Elizabeth Otto 
4 Casters 
The Langdons 
Klein Bros 
Reynolds A Donegsn 

ORPrTSuM 
Lew Dockstader 
Rita Mario Orch 
Geo Kelly Co 
Caltes Broa 
Natalie Alt . 
Moore Gardner ft R 
Everest's Monkeys 
PANTAGES (p) 
B "Swede" Hall Co 
Patricola 

"Batcbelor's Dinner" ' 
Tabor ft Greene 
Samoya 

Camden. If. J. 

TOWERS (ubo) 
2d hslf (8-11) 

Berry ft Berry 

Marie Donohue 

Willard ft Wilson . 

Lee Bennett 

"Bdg School Girls" 

Canton. O. 

LYCEUM (ubo) 
Alvln A Wms 
Chas Althof 
"Night Boat" 
Bryan Lee Co 
"Fortune Seekers** 

Cedar Rapids. la. 

MAJESTIC (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Princess Kalama 
Allan Dlnehart Co 
Marie Fltzaibbons 
R Royal's Horses 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Original Barretts 
Francis Kennedy 
Mme Dorla Co 
Mlddleton A Spellmeyer 
C Francis Relsner 
"Elopers" 

Campaign, 111. 
ORPHEUM (wva) 
"Suffragette Revue" 

, 2d balf 
Morris Golden 
Four Renees 
Barry Girls 
Lamont's Days 
McConnell A Simpson 

Charleston, S. C. 
ACADEMY (ubo) 
Mack A Unis 
Virginia Dale 
The Vernons 
I A B Smith 
Dinklns Barr A E 

2d half 
Leroy A Paul 
Moore O'Brien AMcC 
Oscar Lorraine 
Merle's Cockatoos 
(One to fill) 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
RTALTO (ubo) 
(Knoxvllle split) 
1st balf 
Stuart Darrow 
Ward A Van 
Tonse A Jean 
Al Herman 
The Terrys 

Chicago 

MAJESTIC (orphT 
Louis Mann Co 
White A Cnvanagh 
Kouns Sis (local) 
Harry drrard Co 
Demarpst A Collette 
O Moffat A Clare 

PALACE (orph) 
Flnr Moore A Bro 
MontKomory & Perry 
■\V-H*f.n-:». Si^frr-j- 
>iT^"«i '1?nK'ne<T':» 
Lovenb^rp Sis Co 
Chaf Howard Co 
4 Danubes 
The Berrens 
Ann Crelghtons 



Hf^-.vi- 




AMERICAN (wva) 
"Sunnyslde of Bway" 

2d half 
Curtis Cnninea 
Sept Morn 
Victoria 4 
Roaa Bros 
G ft L Garden 

AVE (wra) 
Bowen ft Bowen 
Rawson ft Clare 
Royal Tokio Tr 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Kay ft Belle 
Hays ft Loehr 
Julie Ring Co 
S Loyal's Pets 
(One to fill) 

COLLEGE (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Stan ft May Laurel 
Lorraine ft Eagle 
Sig Frans Tr 

KEDZIE (wra) 
Kay ft Belle 
Lane ft Harper 
Gonne ft Albert 
Mlddleton A Spellmeyer 
8 Loyal's Pets 

2d half 
Mystic Hanson 8 
Jsmee Cullen 
"School Playgrounds" 
Freeman Dunham Co 
Royal Toklo Tr 

LINCOLN (wva) 
Curtis Canines 
Denny ft Dunlgan 
"Palm Beach Beautlea" 
Spencer ft William* 
McGoods Tate Co 

2d balf 
Lydston ft Emerson 
Wm Armstrong Co 
Murray K H1U 
(Two to fill) 

WILSON (wva) 
Relff A Murray 
"Magazine Girls" 
Ray Snow 
D'Amore A Douglaa 
(One to fill) 

2d balf 
"Naughty Princess" 
WINDSOR (wva) 
Janls A West 
Mr A Mrs N Phillips 
James Cullen 
Sig Frans Tr 



Diamond ft D 
The Sbarrocks 
"Giace Ahead" 
Toney ft Norman 
Avon Comedy 4 
3 Johns 
(One to fill) 

Crookatoa, Mian. 

GRAND (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
(12-14) 
1st half 
Oallerlnl Sisters 
Flo Adler ft Boys 
Delton Mureeno ft D 

Dallaa, Tax. 

MAJESTIC (inter) 
Nederveld's BsboonA 
Duffy ft Lorena 
Oliver ft Olp 
Herbert Clifton 
Maryland Singers 
McKay ft Ardine 
8 Kltaro Japs 

Danville, 111. 

PALACE (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
Strassler's Animals 
Fields Keane ft W 
Wm Armstrong Co 
Bessie Armstrong Co 
Imperial Tr 

2d half 
Richwsrd Wally Co 
Howe A Howe 
Jane Connelly Co 
Cooper A Smith 
"Miss America" 

Daveanort 

COLUMBIA (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Paul Pedrinl Co 
Davis A Kitty 
Lonas Hawaliana 
Frances Kennedy 
"School Days" 
2d half 
"He's in Again" 



Dartosu O. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Conroy's Models 
Edna Aug 
Margaret Green Co 
MAW Cutty 
Brown H A B 
Sylvester ft Vance 
Will ft Kemp 



STAftlMft ACTS AOi STAftE OAHCMift 

Ad. Newb«rf er 



■■OA9WAY. 
TAk 



(One to fill) 

2d helf 
Bowen A Bowea 
Al Wohlman Co 
"Magazine Girls" 
(Two to fill) 

Cincinnati 

KEITH'S (ubo) 

(Sunday opening) 
Dunbar's Hussars 
Llda McMillan Co 
Leigh A Jones 
Julius Tanner 
Thomas A Hall 
Weston A Clare 
Leach Wallls B 
Marlon Weeks 
Frank Le Dent 

EMPRESS (abc) 
The Rackos 
Morgan A Stewart 
Julian Hall 
Electrical Venus 
Kilkenny 4 
LaVine A In man 
Cleveland. O. 
HIP (ubo) 
Nan HalDerin 
Adele Blood Co • 
Wood A Wyde 
Brlce A fJonni 
Klrby A Rome 
Wermer Amoros Tr 
The Larneds 

PRTSCILLA (sun) 
Lavonna 3 
Creo 

Claudia Coleman 
Adair A Wyant 
Spartan 3 

Colorado Spga., CoL 

ORPHEUM 

(12-13) 

(Same bill playing 

Lincoln 15-17) 
Eddie Leonard Co 
Mabel Russell Co 
Fink's Mules 
Morris A Campbell 
Mason Keller Co 
Ernie Potts Co 
Columhnn 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
(Mid Win Festival) 
Cordon A Blca 
Smith & Austin 
David Saperateln 



EMPRESS (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Will Morris 
Grace Hanson 
Frank Stafford Co 
Jimmy Lucas Co 
McConnell A Simpson 

2d half 
"Suffragette Revue" 

Denver 

ORPHEUM 
Nellie Nichols 
Al Bhayne 
Ronalr Ward ft F 
Mr ft Mrs J Barry 
Stan Sun ley 3 
Flying Henrys 
Young ft April 

PANTAGES (p) 
"Betting Bettys" 
Olive Briscoe 
Bell Ringers 
Smith A Kaufman 
Sigbee's Dogs 

Deo Vflolneo. 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Sarah Padden Co 
Girl Delhi 
Anna Chandler 
Liphtner A Alex 
"The Recital" 
Marmeln Sisters 
Mario A Duffy 

Detroit 

MILES (abc) 
Stanley A Farrell 
Robson A Beatty 
Marg Isles Co 
Three Regals 
Manning A Lee 
Robblns Elephants 

COLUMBIA (sun) 
The Halkings 
Bell Boy 3 
Chiyo A Cblyo 
Patsy Doyle 
Miss Electrlce 
Columbia Players 

Devils Lake, N. D. 

GRAND (abc) 
(12-13) 
Barton A Josephlno 
Kathleen Kla Wah Ya 
(One to fill) 



INTELLIGENCE 



MISS CRANE 

Tfce OeoAlt Pianist 



MAHATMA 

The White Yosl 



p — — ■ J. I.. ,■ . ■ 



VARIETY 



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15 



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-■-' J ' 



Daena.ne» la* 

MAJECT1C (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 

"He's in Again" 
2d half 

Monroe Bros 

Miller Sisters 

Relff, A Murray .. 

Herman Leib Co 

Ray SnoW 

(One to fill) 

Duluth 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
The Cansinos 
Lydla Barry 
"Fishing" 
"The Cure" 
John Qeiger 
F A A Atitalre 
Ethel Hopkins 

GRAND (wva) 
Adroit Bros 
Nimz Schuster 
Harris A Nolan 
Zeb Zarrow 

2d half 
The Blondys 
Nagel A Orey 
Coakley A Dunlevy 
Cloaks A Suits 

Enston, Pa. 

ABLE O H (ubo) 
"Camp In Rockies" 
Hyman Adler Co 
"Petticoat Minstrels" 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Sampson A Douglas 
Milton A De Longs 
(Three to fill) 

K. Liverpool, O. 

AMERICAN (sun) 
"Jr Follies" 

2d half 
Piccola Midgets 
Robbins A Lyons 
Raymond Keene Co 
Coscla A Verdi 
Carlos Caesaro 

E. St. Loola, Mo. 

ERBERS (wva) 
Walters A Walters 
Mary Melville Co 
Balzar Sisters 
Ryan A Ryan 

2d half 
Green McHenry & D 
Dickenson A Deagon 
Treat's Seals 
(One to fill) 

lOdmoiiiiin. Can. 

PANTAGES (p) 
Military Elephants 
Francis Renault 
John P Wade Co 
Wells Northworth & M 
"Smart Shop" 

Elmlra. N. Y. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
"Yankee" A ''Dixie" 
Francis A Ross 
"Tulip Time in Holl" 
Violet McMillan 
(On« to fill) 

2d half 
Blanche Sloan 
Stephens A Brunelle 
Spencer Charles Co 
Joe Cook 
(One to fill) 



COLONIAL (ubo) 
(All girl show) 
J Flynn's Minstrel 
8 Bennett 81s 
Horton ft Phelps 
D E Brurg 81s 
(One to flU) 

BrasunrUle, lad. 

GRAND (wva) 
(Terra Haate split) 

1st half 
Agoust ft Agoust 
LeRoy ft Harvey 
Bert Kenny 
6 Waterllllles 
(One to fill) 

Fall River, Maae. 
BIJOU (loew) 
GYeno ft Piatt 
Gray ft Graham 
"Evil Hour" 
Casson ft Earle 
Clark ft McCullough 

2d half 
Gordon Bros ft Golden 
Beulah Pearl 
Harry First Co 
Will ft Mary Rogers 
Gliding O'Mearas 

Pilot. Mica. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
(Saginaw split) 

1st half 
Polzin Bros 
Bur Lorain 
Six Serenaders 
Vine A Temple 
Tennessee Ten 

Ft. Dodaje 

PRINCESS (wva) 
(Sunday Opening) 

Harold Yates 

Three Chums 

Ward Bell ft W 
2d half 

"Maid to Order" 



Ft. Wayne. lad. 

PALACE (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 

Richard Wally Co 

Adolpbo 

"Blow Out" 

2d half 

Lock hart Bros 

Silver A Duval 

Fiddler A Shelton 

"Funny Sheet" 

Mack A Earl 

Slatkos Rollickers 

Ft. William.. Can. 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
(15-17) 
2d half 
Senate Duo 
"Happ Ruth" 
The Reynolds 
(One to fill) 

Galveston, Tex. 

MAJESTIC (inter) 

(11-12) 

(Same bill playing 

San Antonio 13-18) 
Florenze Duo 
Frlscoe 
C Vincent Co 
Josie Heather 
Vadie A Gygi 
Parish A Peru 
Lunette Sisters 

Grand Raplde, Mich. 

EMPRESS (ubo) 
Eddie Foy Co 
Melita & Bonconi 
Page Hack A M 
Ruby Cavell Co 
L & M Hunting 
(One to fill) 

Great Falls, Moat. 

PANTAGES (p) 

(13-14) 

(Same bill playing 

Anaconda 15) 
Leo A Mae Lefevre 
Oakland Sisters 
Dcrnardi 
Cadora 

Frieud ft Downing 
Rawls ft V Kaufman 

Hamilton, Can. 

'1EMPLE (ubo) 
Pietro 
"Memories" 
Kennedy ft Burt 
"Pinkie" 
Conlln Parke 3 
Terada Jape 
(One to fill) 

Harrlabnra;, Pa. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
Ethel M Hall Co 
Robert A Barrett 
"Bride of Nile" 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Claire ft Atwbod 
Marlon Harris 
Hyman Adler Co 
Mudge Morton 8 - 
(One to fill) 

Hartford* Conn. 

POLI'S (ubo) 
Reddlngton ft Grant 
Mary a Jack 
Hazel Wallace Co 
Cruet Kramer ft G 
Wm A Han Ion Co 

2d half 
Slnclaire ft Gasper 
"Just for Instance" 
Forster ft Lovett 
Magda Dahl Carlo 8 
(One to fill) 

PALACE (ubo) 
Holden ft Graham 
Greater City 4 
"Girl from Amst" 
Paine a Nesblt 
Evans ft Sister 

2d half 
Wartenburg Bros 
El Coto 
"Immigrant" 
Stone A Clear 
Capt Kid Ashore 

Haaleton, N. Y. 

FEELEY'S (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Black ft White 
Brooks ft Taylor 
Force A Williams 
Fox A Ingraham 
Georgia Comedy 4 

Haaletoa. Pa. 

PALACE (loew) 
Karlton A Kllfford 
Belle ft Mayo 
Harry Breen 
Owen McGlvney 

2d half 
M Samuels Co 
(Three to fill) 

Hobokea* N. J. 

Busse's Dogs 
Seymour ft Seymour 
General Orders 
Grey ft Klunker 
Kiltie's Band 

2d half 
Tyler A St Clair 
Belle A Mayo 
Owen McGlvney 
Gould A Lewis 
6 Cromwells 



Chicago's Theatrical Lawyer 

Benjamin H. Ehrlich 



Suite 7«-7t7 



Telephone Randolph 1786 



Its W. Monroe Street 



t 



Houston. Tex. 

MAJESTIC (inter) 
Rlche A Burt 
Burke * Harris 
Alexander Kids 
Callste Conant 
Hermlne Shon* Co 
Brf't Wood 
Selma Braatz 

Iadlanapolla 

KEITHS (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 

"America First" 

Bob Dailey Co 

Swor A Avery 

Georgia Earle Co 

Geo Lyons 

C A A Wilklns 

The Rosalres 

LYRIC (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 

McRae A Clegg 

Jura 

Carleton Guy Co 

Louis London 

"Win Gar Revue" 

Ithaca. N. Y. 

8TAR (ubo) 
a Millington Co 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Francis A Ross 
(One to nil) 

Jackson. Mich. 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 

C A A Glocker 

Fiddler A Shelton 

"On Veranda" 

Ralph Connors 

Four Bards 

2d half 

Arnold A Florence 

Darn Good A F 

Dae £ Neville 

Patrlcola A Meyers 

"Song A Dance Rev" 

Jacksonville 

ARCADE (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
(Savannah split) 
1st half 
Hawaiian Duo 
Bessie Lesten- 
"Tango Shoes" 
T P Dunne 
O'Donnell ft Blair 

JancBTllle, Win. 

APOLLO (abc) 
(15-17) 
2d half 
Four Lees 
Alfredo A Pasquale 
McGreevy A Doyle 
Tom Brantford 
Valentine Vox 

Jeraey City, N. J. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
Curtis ft Reading 
Conrad ft Conrad 
Dorothy Regal 
Peggy .Brooks 

1st half (12-14) 
J B Hymer Co 
"Dog Watch" 
Billy K Wells 
(Three to fill) 

2d half (15-18) 
Soretty ft Antoinette 
Great Howard 
King ft Harvey 
Irish Colleens 
'Two to fill) 

Joknatoa. Pa. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 

(Pittsburgh split) 

1st half 

Old Homestead 8 

Edwards Bros 

Dolly Morrlsey 

(Two to fill) 

Kalamaaoo, Mick. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 

(Lansing Split) 

(Sunday Opening) 

let half 

"Night Clerk" 

. Kaaaaa City, Mo* 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday Opening) 
Rae Samuels 
Savoy A Brennan 
Nell O'Connell 
Kenny A Hollls 
Edwin Arden Co 
' Garden of Law" 
"Motoring" 
"Patrla" (Film) 
PANTAGES (p) 
(Sunday opening) 
Leo A Mae Jackson 
Weber A Elliott 
Gllroy Hsynes A M 
Primrose Minstrels 
Reslsta 

Kenosha, Wla. 

VIRGINIAN (wva) 
(15-17) 
2d half 
N ft S Kellogg 
Miller A Mulford 
Lorraine A Eagle 

Knoxvllle. Teaa. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
(Chattanoog.-t split) 
1st half 
Ruth Curtis 
Wm Fb« 
B fr TV'-Rovfpw 
WV-bb & Duma 
Blcknell 

Kokomo, Tnd. 

SIPE (ubo) 
Arthur Turrelly 
Paul Bawens 



Keane ft Williams 
O'NIel ft Oallagher 
"Funny Sheet" 
2d half 
"Blow Out" 

Lafayette. lad. 

FAMILY (Ubo) 
Lotkhart Bros 
Howe ft Howe 
J C Lewis Co 
Freeman Dunham Co 
Slatkes Rollickers 

2d half 
LeR ft M Hart 
Kane ft Williams 
Emily Darrell Co 
Bessie Browning 
"School Playground" 

Lancaster, Pa. 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Loraien ft Crawford 
Horton ft Philips 
Mabel Johnson 
Mellllo Sisters 

Lanalan;, Mick. 

BIJOU (ubo) 
'(Kalamazoo split) 
(Sunday opening) 
1st half 
Carlita ft Howland 
Work ft Ower 
"Lawn Party" 
Bert Howard 
Robbie Gordone 



ORPHEUM (sun) 
Rogers ft Jonas 
5 Sweethearts 
8 Shelvey Bros 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
"Trip of Pleasure" 

Sespo Duo 
olden Tr 
(Two to fill) 

Llacoln. Nek. 

LYRIC (wva) 
Han ley Girls 
Chas Hendrlx Co 

2d half 
Shirley Sisters 
A Nicholson 8 

ORPHEUM (wva) 
(12-14) 
1st half 
Lew Fltzgibbons 
Isabelle Miller Co 
Sllber A North 
Howard's Bears 

B'WAY (ubo) 
Grace Wasson 
"Anderson Revue" 



Lewis ft White 
Havilans A Thornton 
Eddie Dowling 
H Germani 3 

Marlaette. Wla. 

BIJOU (ubo) 

(15-17) 

2d half 
Teddy A May 
Harvard A Cornell 
Kip A Klppy 

Marlon, Ind. 

LYRIC (ubo) 
"Miss America" 

2d half 
"Anderson Revue" 

Maraaalltown, la. 

CASINO (abc) 

(15-17) 

2d half 

Mr A Mrs Arthur Don 

Halligan A Coombs 

McNiel A Mayo 

Maaoa City. la. 

REGENT (wva) 

(Sunday opening) 
Howards A Fields 
Chas Glbbs 
Mile Doria Co 
2d half 
"Girl Worth While" 

CECIL (abc) 
McNiel A Mayo 
Hayes A England 

2d half 
The Karuzos 
Ada'nac 3 

MoKer sport. Pa. 
WHITES HIP (ubo) 
Arthur Havel Co 
"Wonder Art" 
Martinettl A Sylvester 
JAM Harklns 
Mueller A Meyers 

2d half 
B Gaylor A Lancton 
BAH Gorden 
Irish Am Girls 
Marguerite A Hanley 
Stuart ft Keeley 

Memphis, Tcnn. 
ORPHEUM 
Laura N Hall Co 
Kalmar A Brown 
Wms & Wolfus 
Cartmell A Harris 
Cecile Weston Co 
Plelot A Scofleld 

LYCEUM (loew) 
I A W Brooks 
Ed A Jack Smith 
"Man in Dark" 
Tom Kelly 
Gleasons A O'Houlihan 



rae 



Original 



CONTINENTAL HOTEL 

LOS ANGELES and SAN FRANCISCO 
and Fnrneee i'TOajr-Flftr' / 



2d half 
Eleanor Sherman 
"On Veranda" 

Little Rock. Ark. 

MAJESTIC (inter) 
LernivUl Bros 
Gilbert ft Clayton 
G Demarel Co 
Klass A Walman 
Petram's Circus 
2d half 
Frank Hartley 
Del isle A Vernon 
Dorothy Brenner 
Eckhart ft Parker 
Morin Sisters 

Loa Aaaelea 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday Opening) 
P N Terry Co 
Valleclta's Leopards 
Lambert ft Fredericks 
Mme Donald Ayer 
Ines Macauley Co 
Willing A Jordan 
Milt Collins 
Roney A R 

PANTAGES (p) 
Sterling A Marguerite 
Joe Roberts 
La Scala 6 
La Malre A Dawson 
Winston's Sea Lions 

Lonleville, Ky. 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
Girl 1.000 Eyes 
Avellng A Lloyd 
Kelly Wilder Co 
"Prosperity" 
Kelly A CTalvin 
Lew Hoets 
5 of Clubs 
Maximilian's Dogs 
Lowell, Maaa. 
KEITH'S (ubo) 
Vande Meer 
Hager A Woodwln 
Thornton A Thornton 
"The Miracle" 
Hufford A Chain 
Winifred Gllrance Co 
C Dean Players 
Macon, Ga. 
GRAND (libo) 
(AOwim*. sijiU) 
- • - :*l half 
The Pells 



Milwaukee, wis. 

MAJESTIC (orph) 
Bankoff A Girlie 
Bert Fitzglbbon 
Ruth Budd 
Raymond ft Caverly 
Julie Ring Co 
Voland Gamble 
Clown Seal 

Mlaneanolla 

ORPHEUM 
Emma Cams Co 
Chas Grapewln Co 
Linne's Girls 
Brent Hayes 
Newhoff ft Phelps 
Mr ft Mrs O Wilde 
"Patrla" (Film) 

PANTAGES (p) 
(Sunday opening) 
J ft B Dooley 
Zelaya 

Billy McDermott 
Ebtrellta ft Pagean 
"Uneeda Girl Co" 

GRAND (wva) 
Gallerlnl Bisters 
Flo Adler ft Boys 
Delton Mareeno ft D 
Holmes ft Wells 

PALACE (wva) 
Darto A Rialto 
Dixie Harris 4 
"Cheaters" 
Great Lester 
"Girl In Moon" 

UNIQUE (abc) 
Lyle A Harris 
Evans A Newton 
Janet Allan Co 
Hlatt A Oeer 
Hill's Circus 

2d half 
Trolley Car Duo 
Guy Baldwin 3 
Jessie Shirley Co 
Novelty Minstrels 
(One to nil) 

Montreal 

ORPHEUM (ubo) 
Rowley A Tlnton 
W H Lytell Co 
Stone A Hsyes 
Isahl Japs 
rw-rnle k ..BsVer 
"Girlies' Gambol'* 
(One to fill) 



E. HEMMENDINGER«„ t & H y?„y 

Tel. s7l Joan Jsvsters ft* the rvefeari 



RUT 



FRANCAIS (ubo) 
(Ottawa split) 
1st half 
J ft Flo Bogard 
Les Valgos 

McCormlek ft Wallace 
Fernan Thetion 
(Two to 9U)< 

Mooae Jaw, Sank. 
ALLAN (wva) 
(12-13) 
Rome A Wager 
Freemont Benton Co 
Ernest Dupille 
Hayashl Japs 

Mt. Vernon. N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
1st half (12-14) 
D Granville Co 
Wm Morris Co 
Ben Deelly Co 
Von Hamp A Shriner 
Doss 
(One to fill) 

2d half (15-18) 
Roder A Ingram 
Harry Fern Co 
Loney Haskell 
Jim Bicycle 2 
(Two to nil) 

Muakesron, Mick. 

REGENT (ubo) 
(Sunday opening) 
Nelson Sisters 
Eleanor Sherman 
Mack A Earl 
Devine A Williams 
"Sept Morn" 

2d half 
Pictures 

Nashville 

PRINCESS (wva) 
(Birmingham split) 
1st half 
Kanozawa Japs 
Nieller A Rainey 
Fern A Davis 
Orr ft De Costa 
Jean Adair Co 
4 Husbands 
(For Birmingham only. 
The last half) 

Newark. N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
De Voe A Staia 
Beaumont ft Arnold 
John Dunsmore 
William Morris Co 
Hurst A Creighton 

MAJESTIC (loew) 
Harrington A Lamster 
Chabot A Dixon 
Foster ft Ferguson 
Helen Page Co 
Jack Goldle 
4 Dordeens 

2d half 
Hall Ellsworth k M 
Williams ft Segal 
Tom Davles Co 
Harry Breen 
Cummins A Seeham 
(One to nil) 

New Haven. Conn. 

POLI'S (ubo) 
Casettl ft Rydell 
HUbert ft Nugent 
Green Miller ft G 
Ed Morton 
"Cabaret Girl" 
2d half 
Fall ft Fall 
Richter ft Videttl 
4 Frollckers 
Master Gabriel Co 
Joseph L Browning 
Evans ft Sister 

BIJOU (ubo) 
Irma A Connor 
V A C Avery 
Hippodrome 4 
Mack Family 

2d half 
Mary ft Jack 
4 Southern Girls 
Gruet Kramer & O 
Wm A Hanlon Co 

New London, Conn. 

LYCEUM (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Noddles Fsgan 
Young Americans 
Florence Reed 

New Orlcana 
ORPHEUM 
'Bride Shop" 
Diamond A Brennan 
Mullen A Coogan 
Raymond Bond Co 
Sherman A Uttry 
Alice L Doll Co 

New Roehelle, N. T. 

LOEW 
8 Norrle Sisters 
Sandy Shaw 
Homer Llnd Co 

2d half 
Edah Delrldge 8 
Harry Coleman 
Mabel Harper 

Norfolk. Ya. 

ACADEMY (ubo) 

(Richmond split) 

1st half 

Fisher A Rockaway 

Dolce Bisters 

Herr Jannen Co 

Fivi-nk -Terry 

Belt's Seals 

Oaklssaal 

ORPHEUII 
(Sunday opening) 
ImhofT Conn A O 
Pilcer A Douglas 



HOWATSON and SWAYBELL 



"A Case of FWkles' 



LAUOM BROKERS 



Foster Ball Co 
Hans Hanke 
Harry L Mason . 
Mijarea 

Chilsson Ohrman 
ODiva 

PANTAGES (p) 
Portia Sis 4 
Cook Girls 
' Suffrage; te Court" 
Chisholui A Breen 
i unlets ft Conrad 

Ogden, Utah 
PANT aGES (p) 
(16-17) 
Aflki Japs 
Wood Melville A P 
Howard A Ross 
John T Doyle Co 
Joe Whitehead 
Hardeen 

Omaha 

ORPilttuM 
(Sunday opening) 
Cecil Cunningham 
Nonette 
"Lots ft Lots" 
Hlrschel Hendler 
7 Honey Boys ' 
Cautler's Toyshop 
Palfrey Hall ft B 

Oakkoak. Wla. 

MAjfe&iiC (wva) 
Howataon ft Swabelle 
Kuwana Bros 

2u half 
Oden ft Holland 
(One to fill) 

Ottawa, Can. 

DOMINION (uoo) 
(Montreal split) 
1st half 
Roeder ft Dean 
Gordon ft Klnley 
Roy Brant ft Qo 
Van Bergen ft Goslar 
"Board School Girls" 



Paaaale, H. J. 

PLAYHOUSE (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
Hodge ft Lowell 
Jean Moore 
Ash A Shaw 
K Dlehl Co 

Pawtucket, It. I. 

SCENIC (ubo) 
Albert Rougere Co 
Cox ft Joyoe 
' Fred Rogers 
Countess Dlleonarclda 

2d half 
The Azcinas 
Smith A Farmer 
Billy Rogers 
Roger Gray Co 

Philadelphia 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Marx Bros Co 
Elsa Ryan Co 
B Seeley Co 
Laurie ft Bronson 
Eddie Carr Co 
Yvette 

Roland Travers Co 
(Two to nil) 

GRAND (ubo) 
The Schmettans • 
Stpne A McAvoy 
Sylvester Family 
Jessie Standlsh 
Carson ft Wlllard 
Hong Kong Mys 

WM PENN (ubo) 
(This week 5) 
Creighton Belm't ft 
L Kingsbury Co 
Jack Rose 
Larry Rellly Co 
Walton ft Dalberg 
Finders Keepers 
Lander Bros 
Bobble Heath Co 
(Week of 12) 
Burns ft Poran 
"Hap to Ruth" 
.J ft M Burke 
Dark Knights 
2d half 
Levins ft Chopin 
"Breath Old Va" 
Gordon ft Marks 
Heckman 8 ft C 

KEYSTONE (ubo) 
(This week 5) 
5 Kantons 
Paul Burns 
Town ft Bride 
Alice Nelson Co 
Lillian Steele Co 
Linton ft Jungle Girls 

BROADWAY (ubo) 
(This week 0) 
Hoosler Girl 
Regal A Bender 
Cole A Denahy 
Halley A Noble 
Joe Bernard Co 
"Maids of Philly" 

ALLEGHENY (ubo) 

(This week 8) 
"Breath of Virginia" 
Mr Detective 
Brown's Minstrel 
. PiarnLA.Gu?klo 
J uify Francis ft w 

Plttabunrk 

DAVIS (uboj 
"Rubevllle" 
"Honor Children" 



Marie Nordstrom 
Louis Hardt 

^^P* a an* ■ , i ■ 

Van ft Bell 
Bensell A Baird 
(One to nil) 
SHEK1DA.. 8Q (ubo) 
(Johnstown split) 
1st half 
Scarpioff ft Varvaaa 
Claremont Sis 
Wms ft Held 
Van Cella 
(One to nil) 

Plttafleld. Mass. 

MAJESTIC (Ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Kaiser's Dogs 
Warron ft Frost 
Barrett ft Opt 

Portland. Me, 

KEITHS (ubo) 
Juggling Nelson 
David * Walker 
Those 6 Girls 
Elinore ft Carleton 
"Love -in Suburbs" l 
Primrose 4 
Bounding Gordons 

Portland* Ore. 

UKPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Morgan Dancers 
Ryan ft Lee 
Benny ft Woods 
Henry Keane Co 
Maurice Burkhart 
Samaron* A Son la 
Zeda ft Hoot 

PANTAGES (p) 
Klnkald Kilties 
Travltt's Dogs 
Jones ft Johnson 
Great Leon 
Eckhoff A Gordon 
Margaret Ford 

Provlaence. R. I. 

KEITH'S (Ubo) 
Ellis A Bordonl 
Motor Boating" 
Andy Rice 
Welch's Minstrels 
.Marie Stoddard 
Raymond ft O'Connor 
won a Stewart 
Aki Japs 
(One to fill) 

EMERY (loew) 
Gordon Bros ft Golden 
"Ward 22" 
Lew Hawkins ' 
Equlllo Bros 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Lilian Watson 
Frank Wblttier Co 
Casson ft Earle 
Llplnskl'e Dogs 
(One to nil) 

Reading. Pa. 

HIP (ubo) 
1st half (12-14) 
Claire ft Atwood 
Mudge Morton 8 
"Hearts Are Trumps" 
Sampson ft Douglas 
"Dream of Orient" 



BIJOU (ubo) 

(Norfolk split) 

1st half 

Lillian Boggs 

Nip ft Tuck 

"Bway Review" 

4 Paedrens 

(One to nil) 

Roanoke, Va. 

ROANOKE (ubo) 
Dufty ft Daisy 
Nsvins ft Brwood 
Leo Beers 
The Seebscks 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Novelty Clintons 
Brennon ft Powell 
"Joy Riders" 
Skipper K ft R 
Valentine ft Bell 

Rochester, Minn. 

METRO (wva) 
Lew Hoffman 
Troy Comedy 8 
Alfretta Sisters 
2d half 
Von Horn A Ammer 
Flsk A Hill 
Martini ft Maximllllan 

Rocaeater. If. Y. 

TEMPLE (ubo) 
Sophie Tucker Co 
Dooley A Roogel 

Vaccum Cleaners" 
Dave Roth 
Violet Dale 
Francis ft Kennedy 
3 Alex 
Apdale's Animals 

FAMILY (sun) 
Sylvester 
NobJ*,# .Brnhka.... 

Dobutaotles - 

A Morse r oft Co 
2d half 
Visions La Flame 
Smith Keefe ft 8 
A Morecroft Co 



(Continued on page 31.) 



16 



N E W ACT S ~ T H TS W ETE"K" 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK f^^ 



faitiftl Presentation, First Appearance 

or Reappearance in or Around 

New York 

Dunbar's Darkies, Royal. 
Rowley and Young, Royal. 
Kennedy and Lusby, Royal. 
"Sport in the Alps," Palace. 



Mile. Dazie and Co. (4). 

"The Garden of Punchinello" (Ballet). 

22 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Sets). 

Palace. 

Mile. Dazie has a most pretentious 

pantomimic dance offering presented 

by Herbert Brenon. The program 

matter looks like a layout for a regu- 
lar three-hour production. There are 
five scenes in four sets (opening and 
closing scenes in the same set). The 
story is told with a comedy tduch by 
Punchinello in the interludes between 
the scenes. It is a dream with Dazie 
as the dreamer. She is playing with 
her dolls in her nursery. Her collec- 
tion of toys include figures of Punch- 
inello, Harlequin, Columbine, Pierrot 
and Pierette. She lies down to sleep 
and dreams of a tale of life enacted by 
the company in the guise of the dolls, 
with Mile. Dazie is Columbine. The 
second scene is "The* Land of the 
Dolls," where Punchinello as Fate ar- 
ranges a meeting of the four other 
characters and a flirtation between 
Columbine and Pierrot. The next 
scene is a ballroom with the quintet 
again present, Columbine and Pierrot 
leaving the scene to spend a few min- 
utes in the garden, where the drama 
occurs. Harlequin discovers his love 
in the arms of Pierrot A blow is 
passed, a challenge issued, Columbine 
replacing Pierrot in the encounter and 
being mortally wounded by Harlequin. 
The awakening arrives in the nursery 
again, and Columbine discovering it was 
a dream expresses her joyousness with 
a neat bit of solo stepping to the melody 
of a very catchy rag. The latter was 
the real applause winning bit of the 
act. Tremendously artistic is the of- 
fering throughout, the settings re- 
markably well done, the costumes most 
colorful and the manner of present- 
ment excellent, but there is a certain 
something lacking in the early portion 
of which makes the applause seem a 
little strained. The musical score is 
very tuneful and quite befitting the* 
ensemble, capably rendered by the 
Palace orchestra under the direction of 
Daniel Dore. The company of danc- 
ers supporting Mile. Dazie are all ar- 
tistic to the last word in terpsichorean 
art Monday night the offering re- 
ceived a tremendous wave of applause 
at the finale. Fred. 



Smith and Farmer. 

Talk and Songs. 

12 Mins.; One. 

23rd St 

Man and woman, the former in semi- 
nut comedy, with his partner handling 
the vocal department. She sings well 
and scored with a ballad that might 
be titled "What I Owe You." It 
sounds like the work of a lyric special- 
ist, but does not bear the marks of 
market plugging. If it's a popular 
song the publisher is losing time for it 
seems like a sure winner. Some of the 
talk needs strengthening. For this 
grade time Smith and Farmer qualify. 

Wynn. 



Four Earls. 

Aerial. 

12 Mins.; Full Stage. 

23rd St. 

The Four Earls (two men and two 
women) have an aerial turn in which 
the \r.rih ..,*\ra "lilize'l. in preference to 
the brawn. A circular apparatus gives 
a novel touch and provides room for 
some semi-sensational work. As an 
opener or closer this combination fit 
nicely. Wynn. 



Impersonations. 

18 Mins.; Full Stage (Closing in 

-One"). 
Alhambra. 

Frances Rice is "Frankie" Rice 
translated from burlesque, with a slight 
change of name, but small revision of 
offering. She still does the impersona- 
tions she showed the Wheel audiences. 
Her. conception of Lillian Shaw is per- 
haps Miss Rice's best, but at this late 
day a serious imitation of David War- 
field in his big scene from "The Mu- 
sic Master" scarcely seems fair treat- 
ment of a regular vaudeville audience, 
tremely pretty clothes and looks well, 
tremely pretty clothes and loks well. 
Her finale of Bertha Kalich's idea of 
singing a popular song hit the fancy of 
the Alhambra audience and took her 
away to what amounted to a success 
in the important position after inter- 
mission. 



"The Paris Fashion Shop" (4). 
18 Mins.; Five (Interior). 
American Roof. 

A dress draping act, quite similar to 
the one Hugo Jansen presents. It is 
a draper winding cloths around a 
woman until she is dressed. Two girls 
are used in this, with talking and sing- 
ing to fill in the time during the drap- 
ing process. Is made interesting for 
small time audiences, wholly from the 
draping. Simc. 



"Married by Wireless" (6). 

Scenic Musical Comedy. 

Full Stage (Special Set). 

Fifth Avenue. 

"Married by Wireless" appears to de- 
pend the most upon a scenic finish, in 
which a miniature ship is sunk upon a 
sea, the waves of which are in strips 
moving up and down. The story, if 
one was ever written, commences no- 
where and ends in the same place, with 
but two of the six people doing any- 
thing of account. These are the come- 
dian and comedienne, who play to- 
gether so well they might compose a 
two-act in vaudeville for better results 
in all ways than they are now obtain- 
ing. The girl funmaker has comedy 
feet. She sings a rag ballad without 
stopping in her gingery movements 
over the stage and is always lively, 
running far ahead of the company she's 
in. The "Wireless" sketch may have 
been built for the small time. If for 
the big a very inexperienced hand must 
have directed it. Anyway the turn 
should be on small time. There isn't 
enough to it to be anywhere else. 

Bime. 



\ 



Nolan and Nolan. 

Juggling. 

12 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Colonial. 

Nolan and Nolan are offering a snap- 
py juggling routine with the man the 
central figure. Depending mainly 
upon hats, dishes, etc., Nolan makes 
capital use of them, displaying enough 
originality in his handling to dispel 
any idea of stereotypedness in his 
work. In addition to his straight jug- 
gling he goes in for the burlesque at 
times, also using cards for comedy pur- 
poses. Opening the show at the Col- 
onial Nolan and Nolan were well re- 
ceived, finishing handily with the man's 
cup and saucer trick. 



"Ferris Wheel Girls" (10). 

Musical and Acrobatic. 

7 Mins.; One (2); Full Stage (5). 

City. 

Good flash closing turn for small 
time. Ten girls in the act, five on the 
brasses in "one" for two minutes, after 
which the act goes to full stage and an- 
other five girls, all smaller and slimmer 
than the first, go through an acrobatic 
ror.tinc on- the trapezce, which zre at- 
tached, one to each point of a five- 
pointed star. None of the feats is out 
of the ordinary, but the apparatus is 
constantly revolving and the girls work 
well together. Fred. 



•Maud Ryan. 

Talk ana songs. 6 6 6 6 6 
16 Mint.; One. 
23rd 8*. 

Generally, and. justly accredited with, 
being vaudeville's best off-stage com- 
edienne, Maud Ryan is now 'selling" 
her first-class patter over the foot- 
lights, and getting away with it won- 
derfully well. In her "single," Miss 
Ryan makes a quartet of changes for 
as many songs, interrupting them with 
some of her genuinely good "fast stuff" 
and while it took the 23rd Street audi- 
ence a few minutes to analyze Maud's 
humor, she finally had them and closed 
one of the evening's big hits. Miss 
Ryan opens with an Irish number, 
dressed in a green drape, following that 
with the "Satisfied" song introduced 
here by Carrie De Mar. Then to kil- 
ties for "Gootmon Is a Hootmon Now" 
and closing with "Maggie Dooley." 
The repertoire earns her a speech with 
a half dozen bows, but the "inside 
chatter" would carry Maud Ryan 
through with half the numbers. She 
is a somewhat different comedienne, 
humorous to the core, away from the 
conventional "single" woman turn and 
"fast" enough to pass with any audi- 

Wynn. 



ence. 



Milloy, Keough and Co. (1). 
"A Midnight Appeal** (Comedy). 
19 Mins.; Five (Parlor). 
American Roof. 

A political sketch, with boss, secre- 
tary and a young wife who appeals to 
the political leader to call off a bill in 
the Board of Aldermen that threatens 
to impoverish her husband. The boss 
consents through a delusion, and forces 
the adjournment of the Board by or- 
dering the light company to turn off 
the fluid at the city hall. Nothing novel 
in the story, but the slangy dialog has 
been well written, and is even better 
played, particularly by the boss. The 
third member is a girl, the wife, who 
lends no especial strength. Sime. 

Fiske and Fallon. 
Singing, Crossfire, Piano. 
12 Mins.; One. 
Jefferson. 

Man and woman. Latter opens with 
operatic selections with the man as 
"page boy." Puts out blank cards on 
easel, travestying the announcing of 
her numbers. Small time crossfire, 
such as "knot holes, not holes," etc. 
She plays piano. Good voice and han- 
dles the ivories acceptably. She plays 
while he apparently uses home-made 
violin, it developing she is simulating 
the stringed instrument with her mouth. 
She sings again while he strums uke- 
lele.: Neat looking pair, sure to do nice- 
ly on any popular priced program. 

Jolo. 



Happy Jack Gardner and Co. (4) 
Comedy Sketch. 

20 Mins.; Fall Stage (Special Set) 
23rd St. 

"Happy" Jack Gardner's new skit is 
built on a military basis, providing a 
good comedy foundation for Gardner's 
black-face humor, but running a bit 
strong to low comedy for a big time 
vehicle. Gardner is supported by a 
cast of three, two men and a woman, 
the latter essaying the role of nurse. 
The theme is light, but allows for a line 
of good laugh dialog, Gardner holding 
the affair up individually with a military 
song and a brass horn solo. The "can- 
non balls" are sure-fire, always have 
been and probably always will. The 
finale is quite as sure. For a comedy 
turn in its own groove, Gardner's act 
measures well. Wynn. 



Margaret Youngblood. 

Songs. 

19 Mins.; One. 

City. 

Miss Youngblood was the popular 
applause hit of the City bill the -first 
half with five popular songs she sang in 
a rather nasal tone. It is the girl's 
method of putting over a song rather 
than her voice that will carry her over 
the small time. Fred. 



NEW SHOWS NEXT WEEK 

tor 



Lefituiata Productions) 

Mttropotttan Promlsfo* 



"the Morris Dance," Little, FeD.il 
"Magic" and "The Little Man,- Elliott, 
Feb. 12. ., 

Emma Stephens. 

Songs. 

14 Mins.; One. 

An attractive brunet with a pleasing 
voice and a pleasant smile, Emma Ste- 
phens should not experience the usual 
impediments of the aspiring "woman 
single" to get over in vauderflle. She 
is of the buxom sort apd looks whole- 
some, other points in her favor. There 
is a piano on the stage with Miss Ste- 
phens, and she plays it for one accom- 
paniment. Before and after that, she 
sings with the orchestra popular songs, 
having "Sunshine of Your Smile" and 
"Poor Butterfly" the evening seen. 
There was quite a little wait for a 
change in costume for the latter num- 
ber. That "T«rit, Twit" song and a 
red fire medley (own — not home-com- 
position) were also included. Miss Ste- 
phens might create a permanent place 
for herself with specially written songs 
as a pianologiste. The girl appears 
able to handle numbers at the piano. 

Sinclair and Dixon. 

Talk and Songs. 

18 Mins.; One. 

American Roof. 

Sinclair and Dixon are two boys, one 
with "nut" inclinations. They are 
billed as "The Two Joy Salesman" and 
the present turn will restrict their sales 
to the small time. There is too much 
"bidding" for laughs and applause 
through each "working" the audience. 
One way is by betting whether the 
other can make the audience laugh. 
This is carried to tiresome lengths and 
is something a house management 
should stop. The act's best bit is the 
finish, where a special song calls for 
one of the boys to turn over his clothes 
to the other, the team then "splitting." 
A couple of popular numbers are sung. 
It makes a very good two-man act for 
small time. Sime. 



Shorty DeWitt 

Songs and Dances. 

8 Mins.; One. ~ 

Fifth Avenue. 

Shorty DeWitt is trying a single. 
He was at the Fifth Avenue the first 
half this week. The "Shorty" of his 
name comes from his dwarf size and 
this is made use of by the little fellow 
for comedy also, in falls and dances. 
Three songs were sung, the first "A 
Little Bit," then "Mary Ann McCue," 
with a song and dance finish, followed 
by another dance for an encore with 
DeWitt singing a medley to it without 
musical accompaniment He hopped 
onto the top of the orchestral piano 
to sing the "McCue" number and used 
three verses for "A J-ittle Bit." "No. 
2 got him enough to judge he will get 
over on the small time. Sime. 



Grover and Richard/. 

Piano and songs. 

15 Mins., One. 

23rd St. 

It needed two songs and a piano for 
Grover and Richards to get started and 
then their stage time was practically 
consumed. Mildred Grover is the 
singer, carrying a repertoire sounding 
a bit English. The first number is "A 
Little Bit of Blue Ribbon," with the 
next of topical classification, "The 
Tales My Daddy Told." It's another 
style of the old and present days, but 
lacks the punch. The closer was "In- 
nocent •■ 'Mrs. RafTles," accorr.pairved by 
some bright talk that eked out a string 
of laughs. The piano solo was away 
off. The turn is slow and lacks what 
big time vaudeville requires. 



SHOW ITEVTE VTS 



BON TONS. 

"The Bon Tons" 'came Into the Columbia 
this week without Bert Baker. Baker la In 
vaudeville. - 

Although the performance given by "The 
Bon Tons' Is tip top, the absence of Baker is 
felt. Babe La Tour, who for years worked 
with him, is now the feature and easily con- 
firms any statement she is one of the best 
leading women in burlesque. A large portion 
rests upon Miss La Tour, and she never al- 
lows a lagging minute to take up the time 
while on the stage. 

This season's version of "The Bon Tons*' is 
the same as last year's, In book, with Leo 
Uoyt playing the former Baker role and Les- 
ter Allen as his partner. Allen Is easily the 
hardest worked in the aggregation. He Is 
given a free rein and takes the comedy honors. 
Hoyt, playing Dutch, gets fair returns. George 
F. Reynolds is the straight and a likeable 
one. He Is lost for long lapses, but when Been 
always appears to advantage. Other minor 
roles in the male division are handled by John 
Walker and Ed Simmons. 

Among the women Miss La Tour Is first 
choice, although the show has one of the 
strongest female divisions of any on the cir- 
cuit. June Le Veay is a nice appearing num- 
ber leader. Martha Horton has several oppor- 
tunities which she copes with satisfactorily. 
Qladys Parker figures conspicuously in a 
specialty between scenes in the first act, offer- 
ing three popular numbers. 

The production end is about the same as 
in former years. The first act Is in three 
sections, with the opening a store scene, with 
the others a tough Joint and a flash interior 
used for the finale. The second act is in one 
exterior that is attractive. 

The chorus selected by the Theatrical Oper- 
ating Co. for this show is about up to the 
usual standard in numbers and class. The 
majority of the girls have had burlesque ex- 
perience in former years, with but one or two 
new faces. The dressing is below several 
other Columbia shows, many of the costumes 
appearing old, although the lateness of the 
season may bo accountable. 

John O. Jermon Is credited with staging 
the show, with dances by Dan Dody, music by 
Ruby Cowan, and lyrics, Jack Strauss. 



PALACE. 

A peculiar quality about the Palace bill 
this week that does not lend itself readily to 
definition. It was one of those programs 
while a good show still has something lack- 
ing, one of those cases where the big punch 
fails to appear. Yet there were a number of 
corking acts on the- bill and the hits were 
about equally distributed between the first 
and second half of the show. The house was 
not capacity, due undoubtedly to the weather. 

After the matinee Monday the show was 
switched about considerably from the pro- 
gramed running order. Bert and Betty 
Wheeler were out of the bill and Marshall 
Montgomery replaced them, following the 
Asahi Troupe, which opened the »how. The 
third turn was that of Emily Ann Wellman 
and her company in Edward Eisner's flash 
drama, "The Young Mrs. Stanford," itb sec- v 
ond week. This was the first solid hit of the 
bill, although the act was marred by people 
constantly walking in on it. 

Willie Weston immediately afterward did 
a single that was a laugh from start to finish, 
the show being stopped with applause before 
Mile. Dazie in "The Garden of Punchinello" 
(New Acts) was permitted to go on. 

The second half comprise but two acts and 
the fourth episode of "Patrla." Jack Nor- 
worth started things off with his "My Boy" 
number, winning healthy applause. His 
Irish number brought the same return and 
two of his "book" numbers that followed 
were strong favorites. The patriotic verses 
in one especially won favor. The comedy bit, 
with the aid of an audience plant, used for 
an encore bit, was one of the funniest touches 
. of the evening. 

Bert Clark, assisted by another Miss Ham- 
ilton, closed the bill, switched from closing 
the first part, evidently because of the con- 
flict with the Dazle act, because this Miss 
Hamilton does a bit of toe dancing. The 
early comedy in the turn was enjoyed and 
the closing with "Poor Butterfly" was sure 
fire. 

The "Patria" picture closing, found many 
walk-outs during it. Fred. 

ALHAMBRA. . 

The bill has a wealth of class with the 
fine-strung wit of Wilbur Mack and Nella 
Walker and the amazingly fast 1'0-minute 
farce of Wilfred Clark In the first half of 
the running, and the clever entertaining of 
Melville Ellis and Irene Bordonl supplying a 
flno flash of looks for the feature position be- 
sides drawing the Harlem vaudeville fans. 
When Monday night's capacity audience was 
gathered, they found plenty of skillful en- 
tertainers there to keep them amused. 

Herbert's Dors made a pretty opening 
number. The Throe Stelndel Rrothern did 
mighty well with their enjoyable program of 
classical and popular numbers. They had 
the first chance at the audience In a bill that 
was perhaps overweighted with music, but the 
placing In the enrly portion made their se- 
lections (which run a little to heaviness for 
ordlnnry vaudeville usage) "rentable 

Th^n c-M'»; tlw Wilfred Clark miniature 
farce «vli.<1< V-*'"' ov ' r a *^ ,d l»*?tf every 
two seconds. H is not going too far to say 
that for quick shooting of dialog this sketch 
has a little on anything the vaudeville cir- 
cuits have to offer in the line of polite play- 
ing. Mr. Clark makes every point the author 



has provided count for Its full value In as- 
tonishing succession. 

Leon Kimberly and Rena Arnold Mfco 
former being the one-time member of 
Kimberly and Moore and Miss Arnold 
being the ex-partner of James Dono- 
. van) took up the speed where Mr. Clark's or- 
ganization left it and carried the show along 
at the height of the going. It was a high test 
for a two- person combination, but, thanks to 
their swift exchange of wit, tome of It of 
the paprika variety, they handled the situ- 
ation In first rate shape. 

At this point the show, at least as to its 
comedy values, was going more than a mile 
a minute and it would have taken nobody 
less than the pair who had been selected for 
the spot (closing the first half) to sustain Its 
rapidity. A first rate booker must have 
picked Mack and Walker for the Job and 
they Justified the choice. 

The sketch, "A Pair of Tickets," puts over 
the exchange of dialog, as a baseball writer 
would say, "waist high and right across the 
middle" at the rate of ten a minute. 

Intermission came In at this point and pro- 
vided the audience breathing time. Frankle 
Rice (New Acts) did well following the In- 
terval, while Mr Ellis and his little partner, 
who is unusually well dressed even for her, 
kept the proceedings going on for the next half 
hour or so. 

Jack Inglls and Mary Reading had "nut" 
comedy, but nobody walked out on them, and 
If they were 6omewhat below the general level 
of the bill for "clasa,' r (hey held up the spot. 



COLONIAL 

Business was off at the Colonial Monday 

night mainly due to the cold weather and a 

show that did not look* especially strong on 

paper, but worked out to a fair degree of 
satisfaction. 

Nolan and Nolan (New Acts) opened after 
the news weekly to good returns, when Kerr 
and Weston scored with dancing. This couple 
should eliminate the singing as much as pos- 
sible. The boy has little In the way of a 
voice, with his partner doing better with the 
vocalizing. The whirlwind finish with the 
neck-swing appeared much to the liking of 
the audience. 

Lydell and Hlgglns were moved from the 
second half to the No. 3 spot, replacing Mar- 
shall and Montgomery, who was placed In 
the second position. The Lydell-Hlgglns 
offering brought forth some laughs. Hamil- 
ton and Barnes, with more talk, took down a 
fair hit, although placed at a disadvantage, 
following another talking act Their returns 
were satisfactory notwithstanding this diffi- 
culty. 

Valerie Bergere and Co. In "Little Cherry 
Blossom" closed the first half. 

Mme. Doree's Celebrities, operatic, opened 
after Intermission. There are some capable 
singers and the act took down the applause 
hit of the evening. Montgomery, assisted by 
Edna Courtney, next, scored easily. Mont- 
gomery was suffering from a cold Monday. 
Miss Courtney Is becoming an accomplished 
handler of the dummy and rounds out the 
ventriloquist offering In the best of style. 
Montgomery closed In "one" with a few 
stories and a poem. This was necessary owing 
to the time required for the change to the Joe 
Howard- Ethelyn Clark turn, which Allowed. 
Howard and Clark put over an easy hit w4th 
songs and dancing, with Miss Clark's gowns 
In her favor. "Patrla" closed to a well 
seated house. 



AMERICAN ROOF. 

There was not much class or merit to the 
American Roof bill the first half. It seemed 
to have beton placed together with the knowl- 
edge that the Chaplin release, closing the 
show, would hold It up. On this theory, there 
could be left no complaint, for this Chaplin 
happens to be a good one, and would atone 
for much to an audience looking for laughs. 

The program ran along In uneven style, 
with almost everything small time wants on 
it. The bill opened with Eller's Novelty Cir- 
cus that had some trained goats to recommend 
it, with monkeys riding the goats. It looked 
odd and should become a regular small-time 
turn. There Is a special set, with some other 
animals and birds about. It's a clean-looking 
act that Is not unattractive at all, except- 
ing the trainer would greatly Improve It by 
discarding his present uniform for seme bet- 
ter-looking manner of dressing himself. 

In the "No. 2" spot were Sinclair and 
Dixon (New Acts), a rather noisy talking and 
singing turn that finally pleased, and the 
third act was Lee's Hawaiian Duo, man and 
woman, who sing and play Hawaiian music, 
with the woman letting the act down badly 
at the finish with a poor attempt at a Hula 
dance. If the couple stopped singing al- 
together and Just played their musical in- 
struments (one a uke), they would do better, 
but how much better is problematical. The 
Hawaiian thing has gone so far it would 
have to be two exceptional "Hawallans" now- 
adays who could keep In line with It by them- 
selves. 

Next was E. J. Moore, a talking magician, 
who has framed an act that recalls a Key- 
stone comedy, for its mussy matter. That 
is the spilling* of water all over the com- 
edian-assistant, and that same boy after 
breaking an egg In his hip pocket, delicately 
draws out the remnants of it with his hand 
and drops It in the footlights. In pictures It 
wonidp t Jo©"*" mo Imnlv. but any day the Kt»/ j 
stutie comedies may have riveted many a cast- 
Iron stomach that can enjoy this sort of stuff 
in small-time houses. Otherwise Moore does 
rather well, using the "lemon trick" by sub- 
stituting oranges for it. and getting some 



laughs with hit ohatter. He calls himself 
"The Gabby Trickster." 

The first half was closed by "The Paris 
Fashion Shop" (New Acta), and the second 
part was opened by Down** an<< Gomes, with 
songs, their operatic airs toward the finish 
winning out for them* After t**t the show 
commenced with Mtlloy, Keough and Co. (Mew 
Acts), in a sketch, followed by Welch, Mealy 
and Montrose, ond the Valdare Troupe ending 
the vaudeville. 8ime. 



JEFFERSON. 

Musical conductors are proverbially wise, 
which suggests the old aaw about "a word to 
the wise." It waa mentioned In last week's 
Variety that the orchestra at the Jefferson 
was not in time to the various acts upon the 
rostrum. Tuesday evening of the current week 
they worked In unison and played their or- 
chestrations very acceptably. 

After a patrlotlo overture, which suggested 
the English variety houaes at the opening of 
the present Buropean conflict, the vaudeville 
program commenced with LaBelle Carmen 
Trio, wire walkers snd boomerang throwers. 
They do some excellent work of that kind and 
work neatly, making an enjoyable opening 
turn for any high class small time show. It 
Isn't so long ago when an act of Chat calibre 
was employed to dose a big time bill. Harry 
Coleman, ventriloquist, with his special drop 
In "one," offered some weak comedy with the 
"dummy," the only novelty being the rigging 
up of his "dummy" to "walk" at .the con- 
clusion of the turn. 

Burke, Tuohey and Co., five people, offered 
their familiar Irish comedy sketch, In whloh 
Tuobey and the remainder of the troupe feed 
Charles Burke's "Tad" characterisation. The 
act Is built along old-fashioned lines, with 
"asides," and recalls the former "Silver Moon" 
sketch. Tuohey's bagpipe playing to Burkes 
singing of "Kilkenny" le- still as effective as 
ever. Burke and Tuohey should easily be able 
to secue a two-act for themselves and thereby 
avoid the carrying of the other three, who are 
unnecessary. They are good enough artists 
to try once more for the big time. The Charlie 
Chaplin current release broke Into the cen- 
tre of the bill and earned a large number of 
boisterous laughs. 

The Chinese Entertainers, three men, went 
through m fast routine of instrumental work, 
opening with two playing' banjos, the other a 
large slther, three playing saxophones, one a 
violin solo, with fiddle held between knees and 
finishing strongly with xylophones. Flske and 
Fallon (New Acts). 

New York Comedy Four, usual small time 
quartet of males, the "cissy," straight, "wop" 
and unahaved legit with long hair. Usual 
barber shops and finished very strongly with 
some yodllng, earning a healthily demanded 
encore. A very much appreciated three-a-day 
turn. Such acts always are sure fire In that 
grsde of houses. 

Stelner Trio on the horlsontal bars closed 
the vaudeville portion with a neat routine, 
augmented by what Is now obsolete comedy. 
They could probably secure better results^ by 
working straight. 

The first, of the McClure "Seven Deadly 
Sins" picture serial concluded the entertain- 
ment. 

Conventional bill, with .no single women — 
In fact the female contingent of entertainers 
was In the minority. /of* 



CITY. 

The principal attraction at the City the first 
half was the new Chaplin. One act waa drop- 
ped from the usual show. Seven turns, the 
Chaplin and a five-reel Pathe made up the 
bill. The show got under way at 8.10 and 
finished at 11.17. The house waa capacity 
when the first act went on. 

Lohse and Sterling opened, doing 10 minutes 
of a rattling fast routine on the rings and 
bar, finishing with their fsst whirl to gene- 
rous applause. Belle and Mayo, boy and girl, 
singing, held down the second spot nicely with 
a little good comedy In the act. 

John R. Cordon and Co. In "Day and 
Knight," comedy, running a little short, got 
laughs through the In and out of doors farci- 
cal situations, the poker game finish getting 
over strongly. The Three Roaellas, mixed 
musical trio, scored on the work of the come- 
dian. 

The Chaplin comedy split the bill, running 
a little over 20 minutes. The hit of the show 
followed. It was the flashing of slides of 
Washington, Lincoln and Wilson, the orches- 
tra playing a medley of patriotic airs and fin- 
ishing with "The Star Spangled Banner" with 
the audience standing. 

"The New Producer" started the seoond 
half. The turn has been cut down to 10 
people, Including the musical director and the 
ballet dancer, where It formerly totaled 15 
persons. The cut was In the chorus, but as 
the act Is evidently going over the smaller 
time now, this Is sbout right. Musically the 
act Is the same as In the past and but little 
of the vocal volume seems to be lacking. It 
wan a solid hit. 

Margaret Youngblood (New Acts) was the 
applause bit of the bill with five popular num- 
bers. 

The Ferris Wheel Olrls (New Acts), a com- 
bination musical and acrobatic turn, was the 
closer. Fred. 



17 



weak Hearst-Pathe weekly to open.^oesldea 
Mabel Burke's HI. song. 

The new Chaplin Is a regular comedy with 
plenty of slam bang, but no messy slapstick. 
The house had several real good laughs out of 
it, whloh wore enough, -alasy tttreet" is the 
tough alley of a city and Chaplin Is Im- 
pressed Into police duty to patrol it. He 
subdues the bully of the street and trans- 
forms It Into a peaoe loving neighborhood. 

The leading vaudeville number was Ray 
and Gordon Doolsy, next to closing. These 
Doolsys, and there are many of them In 
vaudeville, all seem to be performers. Ray 
and Gordon loo": familiar from a mixed en- 
semble act of some time ago, In which Ray 
did the bed bounding bit she Is now dosing 
the turn with. Ray gradually works Into 
the most prominence, although her brother Is 
prominent enough, also quite funny at times, 
at other times too mechanical In his falls. 
He has the Philadelphia Doolsy fall. The 
couplo are young and this helps them along. 
Besides they are likable and with their 
work In addition got the applause hit of a 
lightly approved show, for a Fifth Avenue 
audience. 

Another two-act was ahead of the Dooleys. 
They were Crawford and Broderick, boy and 
girl, with the girl getting the most out of 
the cross lire points, some of which may have 
been their own and many of which were not 
The smoke, swear and gamble; home In a 
taxi and klsa her and the Geo. Cohan-Jewish 
theatre gags were among their borrowed ones. 
Two songs were sung, "Married Life" as a 
double and the boy singing that father wanted 
him to study law. The boy appears to have 
lingering about him yet reminders of his Im- 
personation days If he ever did that, and he 
acts as though he did, while the girl first 
appears before the landscape drop In evening 
dress, afterward changing her clothes with- 
out changing the drop. That's two-act stuff, 
though, and one act has nothing on the other 
for doing those things, any more than they 
have for taking what they think are the 
surest fire gags they have heard or heard 
about. The girl aeema very capable. She 
has a neat manner of delivery, looks well 
and the couple were much liked. With an act 
altogether their own they might qualify for 
big time. 

Closing the show were Rose and Bills, with 
the man a barrel Jumper and hla partner In 
clown make-up, a girl who did quite well 
at it, although the disclosure comes, rather 
late In the turn, as her speaking voice must 
bsve aroused the susplolon long before. The 
Jumper does some extraordinarily good work 
In their own set, with a 'neat looking turn 
all around. To those liking barrel Jumping 
only, this act will do to open on big tune. 

Van Clsve and "Pete 1 ' opened, the act 
catching laughs, and Shorty^ DeWItt, doing 
a single turn (New Acts) was second. "Har- 
ried by Wireless" (New Aots), that held lit- 
tle, came next and It might do during the 
war excitement After Mies Burke and the 

3 rat two-act were the Three Vagrants, 
banged It aeema in personnel from when 
last seen, with the accordion player appear- 
ing to be new, although the act Is no longer 
In the big time class but will do for the other 
divisions. 



FIFTH AVENUE. 

rivt'.KTh wtr* -the fvaturea ©f tbe Fifth 
Avenue program 'the 'first baT'f. Ciifcf lie 'Chap- 
lin In "Easy Street" and the third ep of 
"Patrla" were the closing Items of a bill that 
carried no great weight and was running one 
act short because of the film, and had a very 



COLUMBIA. 

Last Sunday's concert, carrying nine acta, 
developed into one of the best vaudeville en- 
tertainments shown there this season, with 
practically every specialty corralling /a safe 
hit the only one to even falter being 8am 
Llebert and Co. Llebert held a central spot 
following some good vaudeville material, and 
while hla sketch registered nicely In sections, 
the house seemed inclined to look lightly on 
his dramatic efforts. When Llebert began to 
leap Into pathos, the gallery mistook his tone 
for comedy and promptly booted the climax. 
But at that, for small time, Llebert la pass- 
able. At present the sketch holds things up. 

Simmons and Bradley opened with a roller 
skating turn, the girl carrying the combina- 
tion over with her dance. Nothing partlou-* 
larly sensational Is attempted but the routine 
Is well arranged* and the picture commands 
applause. 

Loewy and the Laoey Sisters held third •pot 
with the conventional trio offering, the girls 
showing a rather surprising personality. One 
of the Laoeys brought home a duet hit with 
the man when she doubled as a boy. It was 
the best section of an otherwise good turn 
snd at their final exit they had chalked up a 
reasonably safe hit. 

The surprise came with Nolan and Nolan, 
man and woman, with the former doing the 
bulk of the work. Nolan Is in eccentric 
make-up and went through a hat and 
ball routine that In Itself guaranteed his 
safety. He works fast, has a good sense of 
comedy and does no stalling. It's a big time 
turn. 

Howard and Ssdler followed the Nolans and 
their success was never In doubt. These two 
girls remind one of the Courtney Sisters In 
appearance, but do not attempt any Impres- 
sion of the other couple. They harmonise 
nicely, have a good selection of numbers and 
look as well as one oould expect. 

After Llebert and Co. came the Three Rosel- 
lon with their comedy musical act. The turn 
In well divided between comedy and music 
with the lstter predominating Just a trifle, as 
It should. The harp and violin duet was good 
enough In Itself to bring them through to a 
safe hit. 

McWaters and Tynon followed with their 
tivn'.Ma*- sl^Klnr. *VAt, flndlog Jt ,ossy 4/» mtk* - 
ttw lrtt . - fonrimlonh, -anti then "'Laa-rfc and 
Hronnon with their splendid little double rou- 
tine came along to sew up the show and bag 
the hit of the day. The Appollo Trio, posing 
In bronze, closed the program. Wynn. 



lg 



MOVING P I CX U K E S 



LEADING FILM PRODUCERS 

PLAN GREAT COMBINATION 



Zukor, Selznick, Green and Goldfish Arranging Gigantic 

Merger of Paramount, Selznick, Artcraf t and Goldwyn 

Production Companies. Big Distributors to Line 

Up. Exhibitors' Combine Also Under Way. 



There is every chance that within the 
next month or so the motion picture in- 
dustry will receive the announcement 
that a new combination has been formed 
that will embrace all of the biggest 
companies that are now in the feature 
field exclusively. The announcement 
will be one of the big surprises of the 
game and it will have almost a revolu- 
tionary effect on the entire picture held. 

On top of that there will be a second 
combination almost as big as the first 
and which, in its way, will be as great 
on one side of the field as the first one 
is in the producing game. The latter 
will be a combine of exhibitors and at 
present there are three groups of pro- 
moters working on the scheme to effect 
a consolidation of the exhibition inter- 
ests. 

During the last two weeks the 
Messrs. Zukor, Selznick, Green and 
Goldfish have been, getting together 
and there is every likelihood that a 
combination of the Paramount, Art- 
crafc, Selznick and Goldwyn companies 
will be brought about. This will be 
but the preliminary step in the great 
amalgamation which, once consum- 
mated, is to reach out and corral all 
of the big distributers, overtures al- 
ready having been made to Stanley 
Mastbaum of Philadelphia, Sol Lesser 
of San Francisco and the Gordon 
Brothers in New England. The latter 
trio seem to be willing to sit in with 
the big producers and play their game* 

Another angle that is contemplated 
will be the sewing up of all the big 
companies that handle state right fea- 
tures and a special subsidiary corpora- 
tion will be formed in which all the 
members of the parent corporation will 
have holdings and an arrangement 
made for each of the producing com- 
panies to turn out a stipulated number 
of features each year for the state right 
field, in addition to their regular pro- 
gram features. 

Adolf Zukor left for the Coast this 
week to visit Los Angeles and make an 
offer to Charles Chaplin. He carried 
with him a number of certified checks 
with which to close with the comedian. 

The general idea of the combination 
is to effect a corner of those producers 
in the field who have the real box office 
stars of the game. Mr. Zukor is the 
prime mover in the deal and he believes 
that with Pickford, Chaplin, Fairbanks 
and Clara Kimball Young under one 
banner there will be a quartet of names 
that will hold practically the entire box 
office attraction strength of the indus- 
try. 

The successful culmination of the 
deal will mean that the exhibitors will 
have to pay bigger prices for pictures 
and that the public will also receive a. 
heavier tax on film amusement. In the 
past the producer has to a great extent 
been forced to bear the brunt of the 
increase in salaries as demanded by the 
stars, while the exhibitor has been 
taxed a slight amount greater than 
what the prices were when salaries 
were lower. The result was that the 
exhibitor was willing to get his profits 
out of a bigger capacity rather than out 
of an increased admission scale. The 
new era will undoubtedly mean that 
the admission scale will have to be 
"noosle/t. . ... . .'":.'" 

In the exhibiting field there are three 
distinct groups of promoters all work- 
ing with the same goal in view. The 



first group is said to have the veteran 
of the film game, Percy Waters, at its 
helm. Another group has Max Spie- 
gel of the Strand Theatre Company di- 
recting its movements, and the third is 
believed to have the backing of the 
most powerful vaudeville interests in 
the country behind it. 

The general idea of all three factions 
is to establish the larger film theatres 
of the country into a circuit of some 
sort with a general booking office in 
New York City from which the affairs 
of the houses are to be directed. The 
shows are to be arranged by expert film 
bookers, much after the fashion as the 
vaudeville shows ' are now handled, 
with the booking office dealing with 
the producers and then in turn selling 
to the exhibitors, with the profits of 
the central office to be split after the 
fashion that it is done in vaudeville at 
present. Each of the houses in the 
circuit is to represent a certain number 
of shares of stock in the combination 
and the profits are to be declared on 
the stock valuation. 

If the latter scheme goes through it 
will mean that the producers will have 
an absolutely united film exhibitors' 
association to contend with and the lat- 
ter will then be in a position to make 
certain demands on the producers 
which will have to be heard because of 
the strength of the central booking 
office. 



fXirbanks-artcraft films. 

The Artcraft will distribute the 
Douglas Fairbanks feature films here- 
after. They are to be made by Fair- 
banks, personally, without corporate 
title so far, and turned over to Art- 
craft for the trade, under some sort of 
a guarantee arrangement. 

Fairbanks has started on the first film. 
It will be publicly exhibited during 
March. 

Up to date no action has been taken 
by Triangle against Fairbanks, Fair- 
banks having served notice on the Tri- 
angle Jan. 2 of his intention to sever 
business relations with that corpora- 
tion. 



BERT WILLIAMS SCENARIOS. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Bert Williams, here with the "Fol- 
lies," is writing scenarios for one*-reel 
comedies, in which he may be featured 
during the coming summer. The pic- 
tures are to be made by Selig. 

It is said Williams would think up 
funny ideas while dining after the show 
and then forget them in the morning. 
This Williams denies. He says that 
his own reelers really cloak a clever 
advertising stunt. 



ILL. LEAGUE ELECTION. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

Indications point to some lively times 
on the floor of the Illinois Exhibitors' 
League meeting Friday night when the 
annual election of officers occurs. 

While George Henry, the present 
chief executive, is announced as a can- 
didate for re-election, it is understood 
another ticket headed by Joe Hoop for 
j.r^-jtv'cnt. and James Heaney (of the 
Virginia theatre). 

Sydney Smith will be re-elected sec- 
retary and William Sweeney treasurer. 



"INTOLERANCE" DRAWING. 

D. W. Griffith's "Intolerance" still 
continues to be Chicago's favorite 
amusement and from all indications its 
remarkable run at the. Colonial theater, 
which has averaged in the past ten 
weeks over $12,000 per week, will not 
end before hot weather. 

The Philadelphia engagement at the 
Chestnut Street Opera House is now 
seven week's old and its very profitable 
earnings show no signs of diminution. 

Reports from the various organiza- 
tions now covering the country signify 
that Mr. Griffith's latest spectacle is 
quite as potent a gatherer of notable 
gross receipts as his first one. In Mil- 
waukee, in two weeks, "Intolerance" 
drew $21,410.50 to the Davidson theater. 
In Richmond the Southern company in 
a three-day engagement played to 
$4,950. 



COPYRIGHTED BARCLAY. 

Don B. Barclay, the former burlesque 
comic and now with the "Follies," will 
be starred in one, two and three reel 
comedies, the pictures to be known 
as the "Billiken" films, to be made dur- 
ing the coming summer. The title is 
copyrighted and is really Barclay's 
middle name, he having adopted it for 
good luck when he went on the stage 
several years ago. Barclay's zig-zag 
hair part has also been copyrighted. 

A special company has been formed 
for the making of the comedies, with 
local capital interested. Ike Billon: 
and Edw. Cavanagh being named. 
Barclay is to receive 40 per cent, of 
the stock in addition to a guaranteed 
salary. 

FIVE-DOLLAR FILM PROMISED. 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 

A "five-dollar" picture fee is what 
J. L. Kempner, head of the Signet 
Films, New York, declared he would 
establish in New York before many 
months. Kempner was here for sev- 
eral days last week en route from San 
Francisco, where he had gone to close 
several deals for his "Masque of Life" 
picture. 

Kempner plans to show a picture in 
a Broadway house and charge $5.00 
top. He claims to have a big film 
spectacle "under cover," which he will 
show to New Yorkers at five dollars a 
throw. 



LUCY WESTON WITH FOX. 

Lucy Weston is confined to her home 
in New York with illness. Upon re- 
covery she will be added to the William 
Fox screen stars. 

Miss Weston has been in retirement 
since last February, at which time she 
was operated upon for mastoiditis, 
which requires about 18 months for 
complete recovery. 



NEW THEATRE CORP. FORMED. 

Albany, N. Y., Feb. 7. 

Articles of incorporation were filed 
at the Secretary of State's office to-day 
by the Mayfair Cinema Theatre Cor- 
poration, with a capital stock of $750,- 
000. The company has been formed 
for the purposes of buying land, build- 
ing and managing theatres and con- 
ducting various other forms of amuse- 
ment enterprises. 

The incorporators are F. Morris, 
Frank E. Force and Elmer Lind. The 
directors include the foregoing and 
Willard Holcomb and Edward F. Gil- 
lece, with offices at 175 Fifth avenue. 
Former State Senator William M. Ben- 
nett appears as counsel for the new 
company. 



COLORED PEOPLE IN FILM. 

Henry W. Savage, while resting at 
his home in Florida, is making another 
scree" .production in which he will em- 
ploy, a horde, of .. coWed natives He 
rertrrrvs to New York in a fortnight. 

Mr. Savage made his screen produc- 
tion of "Robinson Crusoe" under simi- 
lar circumstances. 



MORMONS OPPOSE FILM. 

Something of the class opposition 
"The Birth of a Nation" encountered 
from the Negroes* who thought the 
Griffith .film degraded them is slid to 
be lining up for "A Mormon Maid," the 
new five reel photo drama that the 
Friedman Enterprises Corporation are 
to show to the trade next Friday morn- 
ing at the Strand theatre. The new 
photo play's scenes are taken largely 
m the territory and among the people 
it aims to depict, and while polygamy 
is not made the base of the action that 
phase of Mormonism, k is asserted, has 
not been ignored. It is because of this 
direction of the story, which is by Paul 
West, that the opposition is said to be 
excited. 



KLAW TALKS. 

' New Orleans, Feb. 7. 

Marc Klaw is here this week and 
from a local interview, he or his firm, 
Klaw & Erlanger, must be quite angry 
at moving pictures. Klaw gave all the 
credit for picture stars to legitimate 
producers, saying pictures had made 
but two stars of its own, Mary Pick- 
ford and Charlie Chaplin, neglecting 
to mention each draws $10,000 in week- 
ly salary. Ten thousand * dollars is 
looked upon as a big weekly gross 
amount for an entire legitimate produc- 
tion to play tr at $2 top without the 
added amount from ticket speculators. 

Mr. Klaw observed restaurants will 
yet show moving pictures between 
courses that will affect pictures. He 
seemed unaware this had been tried 
and was a failure. 



JAMES YOUNG RUNS AMUCK. 

A sequel to the Clara Kimball 
Young-James Young estrangement of 
a year and a half ago was enacted in 
full view of passing theatre goers at 
45th street and Broadway last Saturday 
night. 

Miss Young, in the company of 
Harry Carson, a motion picture man 
from Defrr-'*, were on their way to see 
a show, when Mr. Young in a jealous 
fit at seeing his former wife, drew a 
gold pocket knift and slashed Carson 
across the hands and nek. 

Young was arrested and held. Car- 
son was treated at the Polyclinic Hos- 
pital. 

Young was in New York on a vaca- 
tion previous to directing for Essanay, 
where he was to do "On Trial." 



MOSS GETS SEVEN SINS. 

The Moss Circuit has arranged for 
the exclusive booking of the McClure 
series of "Seven Deadly Sins" at all 
their theatres. McClure has worked a 
dandy publicity stunt in connection 
with these releases. A coupon was 
printed in all the McClure publications 
offering a free photo of any of the stars 
in the McClure productions, providing 
the name of the theatre patronized was 
mentioned in the reuuest. McClure is 
in receipt of over one million of these 
requests, which will be tabulated and 
given to the sales department, to be 
shown to exhibitors from whose terri- 
tory the requests come. 



J. FRANK BROCKLISS HERE. 

J. Frank Brockliss, representing Ruf- 
fells, Inc., of London, is in New York, 
looking over the open market with a 
view to securing the English rights to 
film suitable for foreign exhibition. 
Asked how he felt the other morning, 
Mr. Brockliss answered that he was 
) "quite pink." 

HEAVY PENALTIES. 

The Special Session Justices sitting 
in New York County have been un- 
usually severe in imposng penalties 
upon offenders of the law prohibiting 
minors, from entering theatres • urvtess- 
aceompanied by ' parent or guardian, 
two motion picture exhibitors receiv- 
ing a 30-day jail sentence and another 
fined $150. 



- 






MOVI 

WALTER E. GREEN 







ICTURES 



19 



Statistic* arc not always .... r.Ycitmg 
reading, and many people find them 
dull. But there are times when they 
art alight with interest, and in the case 
of the Artcraft Pictures Corporation, 
whose president is Walter £. Greene, 
their knowledge is almost a revelation. 

Mr. Greene (on the front cover this 
week), who has obtained a position of 
prominence and is at present in the 
Piifrlic Eye continually tor his striking 
methods and unusual success, is one of 
the most enterprising men of the day. 
He is a man not spoiled by adulation, 
but proceeds on his way with the ut- 
most unconcern as far as criticism and 
praise of his methods are concerned. 
The one thing vital to him is the ulti- 
mate goal toward which he is travel- 
ing with his Artcraft Pictures. 

Mr. Greene admits quite frankly the 
Artcraft Pictures Corporation was born 
in an effort to solve a matter of motion 
picture importance. It was a problem 
to furnish the largest theaters with su- 
perior productions and to keep them 
superior. A picture worthy of the very 
best as to distribution and exhibiting 
was continually put on a par with an 
insignificant inartistic effort, a relic, 
perhaps, of the old days, or a produc- 
tion of a very inferior motion picture 
concern. All pictures appeared on one 
bf!l and with the exception of the fact 
that perhaps the feature picture was 
better advertised, it nevertheless was 
•laced wrong, and suffered greatly in 
consequence. 

In these days of progress, no man 
Who is vitally interested in giving the 
public the highest and best, who is 

filling to spend the money to make 
is picture perfect, and who is certain 
hen the picture is released that some- 
thing of the best has gone into its gen- 
Sral makeup, likes to see his effort 
illed with trashy pictures. It is the' 
Id, old story of the survival of the fit- 
test, and U is true in the motion pic- 
Sre world most particularly because 
ere seems to be such rapid develop- 
ent there constantly that the public 
Lj beginning to refuse to pay for any- 
fting but the very best. 
"In regard to the birth of the Artcraft 
Pictures Corporation, formerly when a 
Superior picture was shown, in order 
f& receive the necessary revenue to 
pay for its expenses, an extra price was 
attached to the general admission price. 
This did not seem the correct way to 
soTVe the problem, and Mr. Greene's 
w idea, which fixes the market value 
his pictures definitely seems a much 
e idea! way of managing matters. 
In distributing Artcraft Pictures, Mr. 
tifeene takes into consideration the 
Met he is offering an exceptional pic- 
ture for distribution. He has given the 
mr.ld a story of the best caliber, writ- 
tin by about the best star the country 
has, and conveying the impression of 
General appeal, a combination which is 
4fp night irresistible. Therefore there 
if I fixed price that the exhibitor pays 
ikjlpe wishes to show anArtcraft Picture. 
Not that each exhibitor pays the same 
for .the- use of the picture, this would 
not be fair. But he does pay a price 
which is in strict proportion to what 
he can pay and (he exact sum is deter- 
mined by the population of the town 
hi' which the picture is to be shown. 
It' naturally would be ridiculous to ask 
"Exhibitor who shows a picture in a 
of 50,000 to pay no more than an 
fibitor in a town of 500. This fact 
readily be seen, but so far matters 
worked out so smoothly and with 
great success that Mr. Greene feels 
he had brought light upon a very 
rult subject. 

tars for the Artcraft Pictures are 
ried in proportion to their popu- 
with the greatest number of peo- 
Mr. Greene's twelve years' experi- 
ence with motion picture development 
hat given rise to a great desire tn his 



heart to moot the law of supp!y and 
demand, and he is eternally grasping 
at something new, something that may 
at first be entirely intangible but which 
with proper debate and solid serious 
consideration finally yields a fresh as- 
pect upon the motion picture problem 
at large. 

The story for an Artcraft Picture 
must be one to appeal through its merit 
alone. It must be solid material that will 
not need too much padding in order 
to make it last the full time, that is, 
aside from an artistic consideration, 
psychological captions and hundreds; of 
feet of deliberation on the part of ,th« 
star in order to take up film, will not 
be unreasonably lengthened/ The ap- 
peal of the picture must be a natural 
one. The greatest majority is always 
taken into consideration, and at no time 
does the Artcraft picture seek to appeal 
to certain sects, or certain societies, or 
certain specialized groups. t Thus it will 
be seen that its general aim Is broad, 
far reaching and extremely practical. 

Much of Mr. Greene's intensive study 
will be direted toward his work, and 
a man who can fulfill the ideals oi 
friendship and the ideals of business 
appliances at the same time is a man 
of great value to the world. 






STUD POKER FOR HIGH STAKES. 

Picture people who can afford it are 
holding poker sessions often of late, 
with the stakes running quite high. 

The poker game selected is stud," 
without a limit, and nothing less than 
$1,000 stack of checks can be bought 

Among the players are a picture man 
who recently collected $1,000,000 in 
cash for his picture interests and imme- 
diately started another concern; one of 
his partners in the latter concern; the 
head of a service corporation who 
claims to have created the present style 
of feature distribution (this same man 
having formerly thought nothing of 
playing pinochle for $5,000 a side a 
game); another vaudeville-picture man 
latterly married and a young bnt fa- 
mous composer of music 

Up to date the youthful writer of* 
music is reported the leading winner, 
with about $40,000 banked as the re- 
sult of his refusals to be bluffed. 



CHARACTER WOMAN "IN PERSON." 

For the first time in pictures a player 
of a minor role in a feature picture will . 
be starred through a personal appear- 
ance in the Rouses where the film is 
being shown. 

The Loew Circuit is advertising Ger- 
trude Berkeley, the character woman of 
the Brenon films, and who played the 
mother in "War Brides" in its houses 
for week Feb. 12. Some of the etfea- 
tres will take the feature for a return 
date on the strength of Miss Berkeley's 
personal presence. In the houses 
where the film is not re-run, a strio of 
Miss Berkeley's strongest scene will be 
exhibited when she appears. 
. Miss Berkeley's individual hit in the 
mother rote of "War Brides" suggested 
the newest picture scheme to ttie Loew 
People. 

In the Loew theatres this week, 
about 20 of them. Norma Talmadsre, 
star of "Panthea." will also personally 
aooear while that picture is being 
shown. 



VITA SURE TO OO WEST. 

Vitagraph is in earnest about moving 
its studios to the West Mr. Smith 
president of the company, has left for 
the western studios, and with his ar- 
rival three i.ew studios will immediate- 
ly be erected 

Vitagraph was prompted to this move 
by the bad weather in January, causing 
a general lay-off of several companies 
with its accompanying financial loss. 



SARDOU HEIRS SUE FOX. 

Pierre, Jean, Andre Sardou and Mrs. 
Genevieve De Flers, heirs of the late 
Victorien Sardou, author of "La Tos- 
'ca;*"have aliened' suit through" their at- 
torney, Nathan Burkan, against Will- 
iam Fox and the Fox Film Corp., 
claiming an infringement of "La 
Tosca" in the Fox feature picture "The 
Song of Hate." The suit is for $100,- 
000 damages. The Fox picture was re- 
leased in Dec 1915. 



PHILIPP BOUGHT WAR FILMS. 

Adolph Philipp, the German actor-man- 
ager-producer, purchased on Thursday 
of last week the latest authentic war 
pictures of the German army, in which 
Count Von Bernstorff, the German am- 
bassador, holds a financial interest. 

Now that the break has come between 
the United States and Germany, they 
are practically worthless. 



OBITUARY. 

Clint Wilson, well known in former 
days along New York's Rialto, died 
Feb. 4 at Newark, N. J. He was man- 
aging the Empire, Rahway, N. J., in his 
last position. Burial will probably 
take place in the deceased's home town, 
Kansas City. Clint Wilson was about 
57 years of age. At one time he was 
associated with Jo Paige Smith in a 
vaudeville booking agency. 



Harry "Quaker Oats" Lees, a stage 
hand at the Punch and Judy, who re- 
cently took a leading part in the stage 
crew s presentation of "Treasure Isl- 
and" at that house, died Jan. 31 of acute 
pneumonia. A widow survives. 

Of My Dear Father 

JESSE JEWELL | 

(Off Maafkla Fame) 

Wlio pa ss ed away 
February ltth. INS. 

Always lovlnf ly reaaamberad by bis 

LILLIE JEWELL FAULKNER 

(Tka Mlniatura Raw*) 



Richard Kohlbrand, age 50, former 
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra player 
and founder of the Cincinnati musi- 
cians' union, died in Cincinnati this 
week. 



The mother of Frances and Ida Mc- 
Nulty died a few days ago at her home, 
3113 Fadette street, Pittsburgh. She 
was 65 years old. 



Mrs. Lillian Maude Tones, wife of 
Frank Jones (Josles and Walton), died 
in Baden, Pa., Jan. 29 after a long ill- 
ness. She was 43 years old. 

Frederick Spencer, for many years 
under the management of Charles Froh- 
man, died in New York Jan. 27, 51 years 
old. 



The mother of Ruby, Babe, Addie, 
Charles and Edward LaBelle, died in 
New York Jan. 10. 



The mother of Mike S. Whalen died 
in Rome, N. Y., recently in her 87th 
year. 

Joseph F. Moreland, identified with 
one of the earlier talking pictures, died 
last month in Philadelphia. 



William F. Daley, general manager 
pf the New York Billposting Co., died 
at his home in Brooklyn late last week, 



SELIG MUTUAL DECISION. 

Justice Pendleton, in the Supreme 
Court, has handed down a decision in 
the Selig. JPoly scope Co. sui* »jrainet 
Mutual Film Corp., re the title "The 
House of a Thousand Scandals,* 9 as fol- 
lows: 

This Is an action brought to enjoin de- 
fendants from using as the name or title of a 
photoplay "The House of a Thousand Scan- 
dals." Plaintiff, under permission from the 
author or his aealgnee of a novel entitled "The 
House of a Thousand Candles," produced or 
made s> film for a picture play following the 
story and Incidents set forth In the novel, and 
about August, 1015, commenoed exhibiting 
such moving picture play under the name of 
"The House of a Thousand Candles." De- 
fendants or their predecessors la interest made 
a film for a picture play with the title or name 
of "The House of a Thoussnd 8candals." the 
story or plot of which Is not taken from or 
based on the story of the novel, and proposes 
to exhibit the ssme under the above name. 
Both parties have expended considerable sums 
of money and extensively advertised their 
productions under the respective names afore- 
said. The action is tn equity to restrain and 
prevent unfair competition. Although there Is 
evidence as to copyrights secured, the causa of 
action does not arise thereunder, snd such 
facte are only material as showing the history 
of the case. The gist of the action Is that the 
public Is liable to ho misled or deceived (Ball 
v. Broadway Basaar. 194 N. T., 485 -Know v. 
General Film Co., 154 N. T. 8., 088). The 
plays themsslves are entirely dissimilar. The 
words and language of the respective titles 
are to some extent descriptive of the two plays 
and the differences In the plots. Plaintiff ad- 
vertises Its plsy as taken from the novel. 
There Is nothing, either In word of similarity 
of design In defendants' advertisements of Its 
plsy, outside of snd apart from the alleged 
similarity In the nsms or title, tending to 
show or suggest that defendants' play was 
taken from the novel or Is In any way similar 
to plaintiff's play, and there Is no evidence 
that sny one hss been misled or any eon- 
fusion occasioned between the two productions. 
Tn fact there Is some evidence that there has 
been no such confusion snd that the two plays 
hsvs been exhibited In the same theatres at 
different times, a circumstsnos going to show 
thst they hsvs been regarded and treated as 
distinct snd different exhibitions. Even If It 
be assumed thst the title. "The House of a 
Thoussnd Candles," Is not desertptlvs, bnt aa 
arbitrary or fanciful title, the uss of which 
ss a trade nsms will he protected, where the 
unfstr competition to based on alleged simil- 
arity, the reeemblsnce must be such ss to de- 
ceive s person making natural snd ordinary 
uss of bis senees ( Monro v. Tousey. 129 N. T., 
88). While there Is some similarity here as 
idem eonans, ths words "Candles" snd "Scan- 
dals" have respectively well defined meanings 
and represent entirely different conceptions. 
As defendants* title 1e not In terms mislead- 
ing, and there Is no evidence thst acvone has 
been misled or that ant confusion hss been 
crested. It csnnot be as id thst It Is calculated 
to deceive or thst deception or confusion Is 
probsble, snd ss defendsnts hsvs not been 
shown to bsve done sny other sets tending or 
liable to deceive or misled, s esse for sn In- 
junction bss not been mods out. Judgment for 
defendants. 



.,►> 



SHULBERG GENERAL MANAGER. 

B. P. Shulberg has been appointed 
general manager for Paramount, -re* 
placing Kenneth Hodkinson. resigned. 

Shulberg has been connected with 
Famous Players since its inception, or- 
iginally occupying the position of press 
representative and being one of a com- 
mittee of three to pass on scenarios. 

PERFECT PUT COMING. 

New York is to have an opportunity 
to pass on the merits of what hat been 
pronounced "the perfect play" at the) 
Elliott, when "Magic," by Gilbert K. 
Chesterton, is presented tor the first 
time in this country. 

Mr. Chesterton is the English essay* 
ist. This is the only play he hat 
written. 

George Moore, the English author, 
pronounced "Magic" the perfect play. 

Donald Gallagher and Cathleen Nes- 
bit are in the cast 

In conjunction there will also be 
presented "The Little Man,** a humor* 
ous playlet by John Galsworthy, the 
only humor writing he has attempted. 
Laurence Anhalt has the company un- 
fl>r Kts 'tnanagerisf .wing. —" 

The initial performance will be given 
in Stamford tonight 

m \l you isn't eJvertlee C VJUMETT"*^ 1 

f *Wt M^rtiss. ^^ f f 



20 



MOVING PICT URES 



Buyers -Take Notice! 





IS COMPLETED 






Eight Reels of Real Thrills 



WRITE OR WIRE 



PARAGON FILMS 

924 Longacre Building NEW YORK CITY 
WATCH for Further Announcements 



NEWS OF THE FILM WORLD 



A banquet wfll be teadcred Roseoo Arbuekle 
•t Lee Aagelee Feb. 16, the day before ho 
leaves Out elty for tho east, wtaoro bo to to 
make oomle two- feelers for tho Jot. M. 
Seneoek company, tbeee comedy 01ms to bo ro- 
loootd without restriction to tbo general trade 
through Paramount. "Patty** will depart from 
Loa Aagelee la a prlTSte ear and have aa 
compear Adolpb Eukor. They will atop off 
ft each eJty where there le a Paramouat ox- 
chance, wbeo plotareo will be made of tho 
croup for local exhibitions. Tho New York 
snivel la dated for about March 10. 



In order to avoid confusion, tbo iTaa 
Film CorpoartloB baa chanced the title 
of Its new production from "The Prom- 
tee" to "Two Ilea and a Woman.** This story, 
written by Wlllard Mack, was produced by 
the Ivan Film Co. under the direction of Will- 
lam Humphrey. When It was learned that the 
Metro Pictures Corporation bad ready for re- 
leaas a picture under the same title, and upon 
request of tho officials of the Metro, tho Ivan 
Co. readily agreed to change Its title. 

Bernard MoConvllle, of the Triangle-Fine 
Arts assnarlo staff, baa written a comedy 
drama for Bessie Love's spring starring ve- 
hicle, the temporary title of which will bo 
"Her Family Name." At present Bessie Is 
completing tbo final scenes of "A Daughter 
of the Poor,*' on which aha hae been working 
for the past four weeks. Edward Dillon will 
direct the now McConvlllo story. 

Constance Talmadgo aad Dorothy Dalton 
are the stars of the Triangle feature releases 
for March 4. MleS Tatmadge will appear In 
a fine Arte comedy-drama entitled ''Betsy's 
Burglar," written by Frank B. Wooda and 
directed by Paul Powell; In "Back of tho 
Maa,** a atronc screen story written by Monte 
M. Katterjobn and directed by Reginald Bar- 
ker, under the supervision of Thomas H. Inee. 



The Baeager Interests of 8bi 
have taken over the Lafayette far thi 
months aad win offer Triangle pictures at 
the bouse. It Is planned to operate the La- 
fayette only until tho new Strand, being 
built for the Baengers. Is completed. ■. V. 
Richards wilt manage the Lafayette, with 
D. L. Cornelius aa his assistant 

Three features pletuiised from groat novels, 
two plays b ased on- famous noeme and one 
powerful play written and directed by one 
of the world's foremost motion picture direc- 
tors, are among tho many big offerings on 
the releases for February. Marsh, April and 
May, just announced by the Metro Pictures 



The Pennsylvania Board of Censors ordered 
from tho feature "Ood of Little Chlldrea" the 
elimination of the '"vision of a woman holding 
a. baby In her anna.** The vision was a repro- 
duction of "The Madonna aad the Child" aad 
waa need to visualise the thought passlag In 
the mind of a woman about to become a 
mother. 

Dorothy Otoh, Trtsagle-Ftae Arts star, aeon 
will arrive In Now York lor a brief frelto 
In the metropolis. Mies Sjteh says the pur- 
pose of her trip le to purchase eotne new 
gowns and see eome of the s e as o n 's theatrical 
suoressee on Broadway. She will Join ber 
mother and ber sister, Ltlllsa Olsh. who have 
la the Bast slnee before Chiisti 



"The Whip," the big metodrsms Director 
Msurlce Toumeur bss scanted to the Aim 
sfler eight months of strenuous snpllcation, 
will be e rnnsrkable production. The Incen- 
tive Is said to lie quite eo much In the fsct 
the big melodrama Is the first states right 
effort of Its director. 



"Skinner's Press Suit" will have Its pre- 
miere In Oreeter New York st the Rfslto, 
wh#re it will be shown for a w#ek, beelnnlng 
Feb. IS. This Tfissensv production, fee to ring 
Bryant Wsshburu. Is released through Klelne- 
Edisen-Bellg-Essenay Service. 

The Conao1ldet*d Film Corporation le try- 
ing to Induce Dolly Hsckett, who Is st pres- 
ent one of the festores st the Coooennt 
Orove, to take e flyer Into the Alms. Mlee 
Heekett bss not yet ooosented to tackle the 
picture proposition. 

The film version of Rex Beejrb's "The Bsr- 
rler." prodorHI by Ben. Hemnton snd Beseh, 
will follow "Twentv Thousand Leagues Under 
ths See" Into the Brosdwsy for a run, open- 
ing Feb. 17. The picture Is owned by the 
General. 

B. H. Bmmtek. district msnsger of the Peer- 
less Service. Ssn Francisco, while In Los 
Angeles recently arranged to hsndle the Art 
Drams releases under the name of the Do Luxe 
Film Lasky Corp. 

The Newell. White Plains, baa been token 
over by K. T. Marvin. The boose Is the leed- 
Ing thestre of the town snd Is playing 
straight pictures. A. cho.nfje.or fxjtfcrr .tnarhe 
mode under the new management. 

Leonoe Perret, director for Robert War- 
n/log, leaves for Miami. Fla.. with the entire 



Warwick company this 
scenes for tho next rail 
fit Slmoa." 

Benjamla Friedman, president of 
Enterprises. Inc., of Mlanoapolla, dealers ta 
feature film, to la New York exploiting 
large p'ctore, deUlla of which will bo a 
nounced later. 



The Adirondack Film Service baa purchased 
for Northern Now York the "Defense or 
Tribute" film, the deal being Blade throng* 
tho Hlller A Wllk agency. 

Tom Wise will go lata pictures, his starrtng 
venture In "The Merry Wives of Wlndaof" 
having eome to aa abrupt termination at the 
Park a fortalght ago. 

A list of literary masterpieces haa been eo* 
cured aa screen vehicles for Nance O'Neil and 
Marjorlo Rambeaa In the o e —o of pictures 
they are making at the Powell-Mutual studios. 

Nathaa Hlrsch of the Pioneer Film Co. 
haa purchased the New York and New Jersey 
stete right for "Maoists" from tho Hanover 
Film Co. 

W. B. Browning has been engaged to play 
the leading part opposite Flora Finch wRa 
the Flora Finch Comedy Co* tnh'nc a Tsar- 
leaque on "War Brides.** 

Pamella makes her debut aa Isabella Al- 
varea In the Apollo production, "Pride and 
the Devil." It to claimed aha la a new and 
unuaual type of "vampire.** 



B. 8, Mesa has secured from Little, Brown 
A Co., book publishers, • the film rights to 
Cosmo Hamilton's **Slae of the Children" and ' 
will make of It a seven reel feature. 

wOl play opposite Vlr- 
aew photoplay on wbloV 
tease work In a few 



Irving t 
gin la Peareoa la a 
the Fox star wlU 

daya. 



Brio Von Btrohelm, technical director for 
Pathe, received aa offer from Ooldwyn, 1* 
writing, when tho Pathe people promptly meti 
the bid. J 

Frank Leaning, long-time of tho stage aad 
veteraa of thousands of feet of film, to tho 
newest photopleyer under wheee name will 
appear ''Direction of William Fox." 



Mitchell Lewie haa left the 
Mms. Nastmovo in "Ceptloa Shoale" to 
with Bdgar Lewis, director of "The Barrlw, 
In n new picture whkh he ta now — «**->g ,, 



.4 




Frank Crompton hae been engaged by Da' 
Horsley as technical dlrootor for the Hora^ 
studio la Loo Aagelee. /I 

The Bailiff to la poeeeeeloa of the M 
Ottawa. Caaada, for rent, amounting to 
Poor baalaeaa. 



1 



Aann Lather ta ao 
Film Corporation. Dorto 
that argnalaatlon. 



The Herbert Brenoa Film Co 
to Ooldwyn Plcturea a flee ooU 
Oarden photographs. 



longer with tho *M 
la Pawn ana roJotggW 

3orn. has son 
ectlon of Maf| 



!jl> 



Wefsey Oray Otlmour bss been employed gd 
buslnsss msnsger of the Signal Film Coffin 
ration In Loo Aacelee. ~ 

The General Film Co. has concluded 
cease sdvertlMng release dstea. Ths 
Idea was abandoned the first of the 



J. Herbert Frank bss been engaged for 
World's production of "Derkeet Russia,* 
which Alice Brady Is to be atsrrad. 



eluded M, 
• ProgrdfJ 1 
year, ffr 1 

i 

t >. ■ * 



Universal has sold the righto for Ohio aid 
Mlchlcan for "20.000 Leagues Under tho djft 
for 170,000. 



Billy West signed s contract with the 
Comedy Corporation for a period of five yi 



91 






Emmett Campbell Hsll has Joined tho 
wya staff la aa executive capacity. 

Oeorge Walsh has hsd s hair cut 

BLANCHE SWEET SIGNED. 

The Charles Prohman feat*] 
shortly to be put in making nj| 
Blanche Sweet as the star, are tejjti 
released through the Mutual proi 

Telegrams from the coast state 
the former Lasky star has been pi 
under contract at a flat *»!*ry by 
Ritchie, president of the Greeni 
Lithograph Co. of New York, w] 
makes all the Mutual paper, and 
bur Dunham of the Sunbeam P*c( 
.Corporation*- -The - name cf the- :., 
producing firm has not been dtcisjfd 
upon but Miss Sweet is to begin wi 
March L 






M O V TN G~T> I C TURES 



21 



THE SOWERGUT FILM CO. 

t ^ . By J. A. Murphy. 

I didn t never expect to have a New 
York movable picture concern named 
after me, and it kind of conW about by 
axcident at it was. You tee when me 
and, Shep Wrenchey and old man 
Shiveley held a meetin' to organise 
ourselves into a film factory, we tried 
to pick letters out of our names to 
make up a title for the company, but at 
most of the names we made up wasn't 
fit to print, we gave it up and voted to 
have a banquet, wich seems to be the 
first thing they do with a picture Co. 
any how. We had the banquet Friday 
night, wich was lucky for me 'cause 
my wife was away visitin' and there 
wasn't no dinner at home that day. 
When old man Shiveley perposed to 
make a close corperation, Shep 
Wrenchley said they had better make 
me president as I was the closest one 
in the party and as long as was presi- 
dent we might as well call the con- 
cern the Sowerguy Feature Filro Cor- 
poration. 

I made a speech by savin* I thought 
I was the best man for the job on 
acount of my bein' indemnifyed as a 
theater man and as long at it didn't 
stick me to pay for the victuals used 
at the banquet I was in faver of ax- 
ception unanimus. Shep Wrenchey 
said the bills for the banquet would be 
tent to the Co. and paid at toon at we 
told tome stock. This bein' satisfae- 
terry we elected old man Shiveley vice- 
president and Wrenchey seccaterry 
and general manager. There was'nt 
much else done at the meetin' axcept 
to set a date for another banquet wich 
waa done by teconding the motion. 

I went out next day and hired an 
offise in the Succotash Buildin', and 
while Shep Wrenchey was lookin* up 
tome tecond hand furniture I thot I 
might at well paint our sign on the 
offit door, and render the bill to the 
Co., to I got a caa of yaller paint and 
started in on -the glass panel. I am 
uset to pain tin' names kind of wide on 
acotorit of bein' in the theater businet, 
asxl there was'nt much room on the 
glass so I painted the officers names 
on the wood part of the door. The 
superintendent of the buildin' seen it 
and sassed me right fluent about it, 
aayin' I'd have to pay for a new door 
wich HI be durned if I will. 

Old man Shiveley got a whole slew 
of stock certificates printed, wich was 
price marked at a dollar a piece. I 
had'nt hardly got the bundle open when 
a feller come in and asked if they was 
any stock fer sale and how much could 
he get fer ten dollars. I said fer ten 
dollars cash I would let him have a 
dozen shares pervidtn' he did'nt tell 
nobodv and durned if he did'nt buy 
'em. I thot I might as well charge ten 
dollars fer plgn paintin' the door so I 
will turn in a reseated bill and keep the 
ten dollars. We might never sell no 
more stock any how, but in case we do 
I will paint our signs on the front 
windows and charge it up. 

There is a lot of film corporations in 
the Succotash Buildin'. Most every 
door has the name of some picture 
concern on it. I thot I would visit 
around amongst the neighbors and see 
if I could overhear any thing private. 
These film fellers are a right ohligin' 
lot. Most all of them was willin' to 
sell me somethin' or other very cheap 
on acount of my bein' connected with 
their new art. I met the president of 
the Hyena Co. and he asked how stock 
was sellin*. I said I had sold a dozen 
shares this mornin'. He looked like 
he thot I was !yin\ so I showed him 
the ten dollars. Then he got real ex- 
cited and offered to swap fifty shares 
of his stock fer one of mine. I thought 
there might be somethin' loose about 
his concern, so I didn't swap. 



TRAVSBS QUITTING ESSANAY? 

Chicago, Feb. 7. 
Richard Travers, for the past five 
years with Essanay, is reported to have 
quit, owing to an argument 



MYSTERY ABOUT SERIAL 

Considerable mystery surrounds the 
release by Pathe of the serial, which it 
reported to be entitled "The Mystery 
of the Double Cross." 

At least two months ago, Pathe 
called all their eastern exchange man- 
agers to New York and showed them 
the first eight episodes of this serial. 

At this time it looked as if the nego- 
tiations between Pathe and Interna- 
tional would fall down, and Pathe 
showed practically all the episodes of 
this serial to representatives of certain 
big circuits, the idea seeming to be that 
Pathe would release it at the tame time 
that International wat planning to re- 
lease "Patria." 

Those who were present at these 
showings pronounced the "Mystery of 
the Double Cross" to be probably one 
of the best, and the various big circuits 
have since been making strenuous ef- 
forts to secure it 

Despite the pressure brought to bear, 
Pathe refuses to announce a release 
date, and just what they intend to do 
seems to be causing considerable 
anxiety on the part of those who with 
to book a serial, and on the part of 
other companies which are contemplat- 
ing releasing serials. A rumor went 
around a few days ago that another 
serial which it practically completed 
would be released March 18. Also at 
the time of going to press, Philip Bar- 
tholomae and George Seitz, the chiefs 
of Pathe's scenario staff, were reported 
to be busy on a big naval serial for im- 
mediate release, but In view of the fact 
that Pathe has two patriotic military 
serials now on the market it hi doubt- 
ful if a third one would be desirable. 

At the Pathe office no statement was 
forthcoming except that the release 
date of the next serial would be some- 
time in March, and that three serials, 
all of which are now practically fin- 
ished, are all eoually good, to that it 
didn't matter which one waa released 
first 



TO LICEN8E OPERATORS. 

A new bill sponsored by Operators' 
Local No. 306, 1. A. T. S. E., and short- 
ly to be introduced into the New York 
Legislature provides for licensed ap- 
prentices, who. after a six months' ap- 
prenticeship, shall be eligible to obtain 
an operator's license. 

The purpose of the bill, according to 
one of the Union officials, is to do awav 
with the numerous operators* schools 
which have sprung up recently. 

A similar law was held unconstitu- 
tional two years ago, no provision hav- 
ing been made for full fledged opera- 
tors who came from outside the Juris- 
diction, and who were obliged to serve 
the six months' apprenticeship. This 
feature has been eliminated. 



POLLYANNA FOR PICKPORD. 

Artcraft is scouring the market for 
suitable vehicles for Mary Pickford, 
their latest acquisition being reported 
as "Pollyanna, The Glad Girl," a atory 
which ran in the Globe and waa pro- 
duced on the stage. Pickford left for 
the West last week to make her next 
picture, "Rebecca of Sunnybrook 
Farm." 



"BATTLE CRY" RENAMED. 

Vitagraph will shortly release the 
picture "Womanhood, or The Glory of 
a Nation," which had the working title 
of "The Battle Cry of War." After a 
consultation in which practically all the 
Vitagraph heads participated, it was de- 
cided to make the change, as exhibitors 
had complained the similarity of the 
title to "The Battle Cry of Peace" 
would hurt it. 



BUYS CHINESE FEATURE. 

San Francisco, Feb. 7. 
The Suprierhe-Feat^re' Ktftti Co. has 
taken over the entire state rights of the 
12-reeler, "A Trip Through China," 
brought over here by Benjamin Brod- 
■ ky» agent for the Chinese Cinema Co. 



COMMISSIONER BELL TALKS. 

License Commissioner Bell and 
Deputy Commissioner Kaufman were 
the principal speakers at a mass meet- 
ing of exhibitors held last Tuesday in 
the headquarters of the New York Ex- 
hibitors' League. 

Commissioner Bell came out square- 
ly against legalized censorship and 
argued the entire matter rested solely 
with the exhibitor. If the exhibitor 
would cease showing sex pictures the 
demand for censorship would cease. He 
pointed out as an instance that "The 
Sejc Lure" posters did more damage 
than any one thing released, that it 
brought attention to a vivid misrepre- 
sentation, and that after his office was 
fairly deluged with complaints from 
people who had never seen a motion 
picture in their lives, he was forced to 
hold up the release unless the title was 
changed and the posters destroyed. 

The commissioner stated that in his 
entire regime every picture he censored 
was sustained by the courts but one, 
"The Ordeal." He pointed out that 
this was censorship without any special 
censorship laws and that it worked 
well, manufacturers making elimina- 
tions and cuts at his request 



His argument was the exhibitors had 
the power to insist upon a higher grade 
of pictures and in that way cause the 
industry to advance morally. 

WARREN'S OWN COMPANY. 

Edward Warren, one of the pioneers 
in the multiple reel state rights pro- 
ductions, has organized his own com- 
pany, which is to be known as the Ed- 
ward Warren Productions. The com- 
pany claims to have extensive backing 
of middle west capital, and will start 
work the latter part of this month. 

The first production will be "The 
Transgressor," written by Lawrence 
Marsden, and in which Charlotte Ives, 
Sheldon Lewis and Walter Hampden 
are to be featured. The Herbert 
Brenon Studios have been leased for the 
filming of this production. George 
Fitch will be technical director, and 
Henry Cronyager will be the camera 
expert. The Warren Productions will 
all be seven and eight reel features 
made especially for state rights. 

H. Z. Levine has severed his connec- 
tion with the Triangle to become busi- 
ness manager for the Warren company. 
He was with Fox prior to going with 
Triangle. 



MEMBERS OF THE PROFESSION WELCOME 



Invitation 

Trade Showing 

STRAND THEATRE 

B'way and 47th Street, New York 
Wednesday Morning, February 14, at 19:30 

FRIEDMAN ENTERPRISES, INCORPORATED 

Offer the First Presentation of * 
Their Newest Cinema 



"A MORMON MAID 



tf 



By PAUL WEST 
With 



MAE, MURRAY 

in the title role 
Supported by Hobart Bos worth 

ADMIT TWO 



1 






The Mormon country with its infinite possibilities for stirring 
drama is virtually an unknown field to the screen. 

Nothing in the silent or speaking drama possesses quite the same 
•thrills contained in the innumerable vivid romances and tragedies 
that make Mormonism one of the scarlet pages of American history. 

In "A Mormon Maid" something of this stirring realism is 
shown. While the polygamous phase of Mormonism is not made 
the base of the play, this peculiarity of the sect has not been 
ignored. 

The photodrama is in five reels, with its scenes taken largely 
in the territory and among the people it aims to depict. 

FRIEDMAN ENTERPRISES, INCORPORATED 

Represented by HILLER A WILK 

Suite 923, 924, 925. Longecre Building 
Forty-second Street and Broadway, - - New York 



^2 



" _r 



FILM PLAYERS' DIRECTORY 

Names of Picture Playeri and Picture Directors, with names of companies added when 
krio*ft. Wktw coii.Lutvy js-uflfceowa, ns abbri'Viaticr^ follows name unless person it 
director, when "Dct'* follows. 

"Dct" stands for Director whenever listed. Other abbreviations are to identify that 
playing company. 

This Directory will be published weekly In VARIETY. Errora or omissions will be 
corrected upon receipt of proper information, and companies added or changed to names 
when notified. 

The abbreviations in the list below are as follows: 



Am- AMERICAN 

Ap-APOLLO 

Ar-ARROW 

Art-ARTCRAFT 

At- AMERICAN TALKING 

^g ASTRA 

And-ANDERSON PRODUCING CO. 

Boa-BALBOA 

Bio-BIOGRAPH 

Bla-BLUEBIRD 

Cit-GATE CITY PROD. CO. 

Cen-CENTURY 

Con-CONTIN ENTAL 

Cha-CHARACTER PICTURE CO. 

Chr— CHRISTIE 

Cky-CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Col-COLUMBIA 

Dix-DIXIE 

Eq-EQUITABLE 

EAR-E. ft R. JUNGLE CORP. 

Eag-EAGLE 

Ed-EDISON 

Em-EMERALD 

Edu-EDUCATIONAL 

Erb— ERBOGRAPH 

Es-ESSANAY 

F-WILLIAM FOX 

FP-FAMOUS PLAYERS 

Fro-FROHMAN AMUSE. CO. 

FA-FINE ARTS 

Got-GOTHAM 

Gao-GAUMONT 

Gol-GOLDWYN 

Hor-HORSLEY 

HB-HERBERT BRENON 

I-INCE 

In-INTERNATIONAL 

Iv-IVAN 

tuv-JUVENILE FILMS 
lin— KINEMACOLOR 
KB-KAY BEE 
Kl-GEORGE KLEINE 
K-KALEM 
Key-KEYSTONE 



A 

Abbey May 

Aobott Marguerlta — 

Field 
Abbott Gypsy— Vog 
Abbott Jack L 
Abernethery Lollle 
Abingdon Wm L — Ca- 

M 
Abramaon I Dot Iv * 
Abrlll Dorothy— L 
Ackerman Conatantlna 

M— Dct PP 
Aoker Eugene 
A cord Art 
Adama Wm P 
Adams Kath— Th 
Adama Stella— €h 
Adolfl John — Dct Fox 
Alnsworth Charlea 8 

— Es 
Altken Spott— Fa 
Albert Elsie— U 
Albertl Viola 
Albertaon Arthur— K 
Alien Mary 
Alexander Ed — P 
Alexander Claire — Hor 
Alexander F D — F 
Alexander Sara 
Allen Bertha— Mllo 
Allen Phyl— F 
Alley A W— Dct Am 
Alllaon May M 
Alter Lottie 
Amea Gerald 
Anderson Rob— FA 
Anderson Mlgnon — Tb 
Anderaon Mrs N 
Andrews P — FP 
Anker W 
Aokl Tsurl — L 
Apfel Oscar C — Dct F 
Arbuokle Andrew— YM 
Arbuckle Maclyn 
Arden Edwin — AP 
Arey Wayne — Th 
Arbuckle Roscoe 
Arllng Ch— F 
Armstrong Billy— Key 
Arnold Cecil — Key 
Arnold Ed — Es 
Arnold Helen — Fro 
A rone Bernard P — Dct 

U 
Ashley Arthur— Wld 
Ashley Chas E — Dct 

Es 
ABher Max 
Astor Cam I He — S 
Attle Jos M— PP 
Atwell Grace — FP 
Aubrey J — P 
August Ed— Pet Kin 
Austin Al— LS 
Avery Cbns— Dct Key 
Averlll Nnncy — EM 

B • 

Maoon F 

Bacon Lloyd F — LS 
Badger Clar G — Dct 
Key 

Bienot King 

Bailey Bill— Dct U 



Bailey Grace H— U 
Balrd Leah— U 
Balrd Stewart 
Baker Ed— U 
Baker Elsie — Wta 
Baker Geo D— Dot M 
Baker Richard P — 

Dct Ea 
Baker Craig 
Baldwin Ruth A— Dct 

U 

Balfour Aug 
Balfour Elsie — P 
Banks Perry — Am 
Bare Theda — F 
Baraehl NUde— Eag 
Barbee Rich 
Baring Mathllde 
Baring Nancy 
Barker Reg — I-T 
Barnett Chester— W 
Barrett C C— Mllo 
Barrett Mlnnette 
Barrlngton Herbt— U 
Barrlacale Bessie — I-T 
Barrows, Henry A 
Barrows Norman — Dot 

Chicago "Herald" 

Travelog 
Barrymore Ethel 
Barry Eddie— Ch 
Barrymore John 
Barry Eleanor 
Barrymore Lionel 
Barry Pauline 
Barry Viola 
Bartlett Chas E— Dct 

ft ' 

Bary Leon— As-P 
Baakette Lena— U 
Bassett Rub — F P 
Bateman Victory 
Batty Stephen— Hor 
Bauer Arthur— Th 
Bayne Beverly — M 
Beach Correa — Reg 
Beamish F— Wld 
Beaudlne W— Dct U 
Beaumont Harry — Ea 
Beban Qeo 
Beck John 
Beldermann David — 

Mllo 
Belasco Jan— U 
Belasco Walter — IT 
Belmont Job — Key 
Belmore Lionel — Dct 
Benedict Klngsley— U 
Bennett Enid— K-B 
Benner Yale D 
Bennett F F— FA 
Bennett Rlrh— A 
Benson Clyde — U 
Benson Mnv E — W 
Bentley Alice— Bio 
Benton Curtis— r 
B/n.ton ,ygrj f h_ . . 
Be ran^rr G.«o A— U 
Bergen Thurlow— P 
Borgcr Roa— Oct Am 
Bernard Dorothy — Fox 
Berthelet Arthur— Dct 

Es 
Bertram Wm — Dct 



LP-LOCAL PHOTOPLAYS 

Lon-LONDQN FILM CO. 

LS-LONE STAR 

LKO-LKO 

L-LASKY 

Lib-UBERTY 

Mor-MOROSCO 

M.n- EMERSON 

McC-McCLURE 

MN-MABEL NORMAND 

Mosa-B. & MOSS 

Mu-MUTUAL 

Nat-NATIONAL DRAMA 

Ni-NIAGARA 

Ncg-NAT C. GOODWIN 

Nev-NEVADA 

Nt-NORMA TALMADGE 

Pal-PALLAS 

Par-PARAGON 

Pow-POWELL PRODUCING 

Pic— MARY PICKFORD 

Pri-PRIVATE FILM FEATURES 

Pol-POLLARD 

PP-PALACE PLAYERS 

Per-PEERLESS 

Pop-POPULAR PLAYS A PLAYERS 

P-PATHE 

U-UNIVERSAL 

Use—UNTTY SALES 

USA-U. S. AMUSE. CO. 

Re-REGENT 

Ro-ROLIN 

Rol-ROLFE 

S-SEUG 

Sel-SELZNICK 

St-STERN 

Sun-SUNBEAM 

So-SOLAX 

Th-THANHOUSER 

T-TRIANGLE 

Vi-VTrAGRAPH 

Vtm-VIM 

Vog-VOGUE 

Wld— WORLD 



Bertsch Marg— Dct Vl 
Berwin 

Besserer Eugenie— 8 
Best Mabel— Vim 
Bevaa Billy— LKO 
BUUngton Francella— 
U 

Billings Blllle— VI 
Binder Ray J — PA 
Birch Caroline 
Blache Alice— Dct US 

A 

Black W W — Fox 
Blackwell Carlyle — 

Wld ' 

Blair Ruth 
Blair Sidney 
Blake Loretta 
Blake Lucy — Moas 
Blake Al D— Ho r 
Blanchard Eleanor 
Blevlns Malcolm — TJ 
Bllnn Genevieve 
Bllnn Holbrook— Wld 
Blood Adele 
Blystone J B — Dct L 

KO 
Boardman True — K 
Boland Eddie— U 
Bonavlta Capt Jack— 

Dct Hor 
Bondhlll Gertrude 
Bonner Marg H 
Booker Harry— 'Key 
Boone Dell 
Borzage F 
Boss F F 
Bosworth Hobart — Dct 

L 
Botter Harry — Dct 

Monmouth 
Bottomley Roland — 

boa 
Bowers Jno E — M 
Bowes Lawrence— Mu 
Bowman W J — Dct 
Brabln Chas — Dct 
Bracken Bertram — Dct 

F 
Bracy Sidney — Ar 
Bradbury J — 8 
Bradbury Ronald — K 
Bradley Harry 
Bradshaw Lionel — L 

KO 
Brady Alice— Wld 
Brady Edwin J— U 
Breese Edmund — Pop 
Brennan Etiw — M 
Brenon Herbert — Det 

HB 
Brent Evelyn— M 
Brlce RoBetta 
Broa dwell Robt B— 

Dct Hor 
Brockwell Gladys — F 

Brooke Vun Dyke— 1 " 

Dct VI 
Brooks Sammy — Ro 
Brown Clarence L — 

Dct Par 
Brown J Edwin — U 
Brown W H— FA 



Brown Lena V 
Brown Bertha 
Brown Maxlne V 

Srownell Louise— I 
rewnlng Tod — Dot 

PA 
Bruce Belle 
Brace Clifford 
Brace Robt 0~-Dot 

Edu 
Brule F— VI 
Brunton Wm — 81g 
Brundage Mathllde 
Brunette Prltsl 
Brunton Robt A— Dct 

Bryan Vincent P— Dct 

L8 
Bryant Chas 
Bockland Wilfred — 

DctL 
Buel Keneen— Dot P 
Buhler Rich 
Bunny Geo 
Burdtck Faye 
Burkhart Theo— Wld 
Burke Joe — Rol 
Burkhardt Harry 
Burke J Prk— K-B 
Burmester Augusts 
Burnett Jesale— Hor 
Burns Fred— PA 
Burns Nell— Chr 
Burns Robt P— Vim 
Burrees Wm — P 
Burrough Tom — P 
Barton Charlotte— Am 
Burton Clarence F 
Burton Ethel— Vim 
Burton Ned— HB 
Bunch Mae— Key 
Bushman Francis X — 

M 
Butler Fred J 

Sutler Wm J— Dct 
yrne Jack— Dct 
Byron Nina— I 

c 

Cabanne W — Dct M 
Cahlll Marie— Mu 
Calvert E H— Dct Es 
Cam pea u Fk— 8 
Campbell Colin — Dct 
Campbell Emma — Mu 
Campbell Eric— M 
Campbell Webster— VI 
Campbell Wm 8— Dct 

Key 
Capellanl Al— Dct Bel 
Capellanl Paul 
.Caprice June — F 
Carew Ora — Key 
Carewe Edwin — uct M 
Carey Harry — F 
Carle Nalda— U 
Carleton Lloyd B — 

- -Doty -- 

'XuTilftle' Kay 
Carlyle Sidney D 
Carpenter Gerald D 
Carpenter, Horace B 

— L 
Carr Dixie — TJ 
Carroll Wm A— Am 



Carter Harry— U 
Carter Nam— P 
Ceaslrielll Dolores — 

Castle Mrs Vernon— . 

In 
Cavendsr Glen — Dct 

Key 
Cecil Ed— F 
Cecil Ora — Hor 
Chadwlck Helene— P 
Cheney Loo— U 
Chanler Elba — Mu 
Chaplin Chaa— Mu 
Chapman, Chaa D — 

Dot LS 
Charles John 
Charleeon Mary — Be 
Chatterton Tom — Am 
Chaudet Emlle— DctP 
Chaudet Louis W— 

U 
Cheater Ruth 
ChUders Naomi— VI 
Chram Violet— U 
Christie Al B— Dct 

Chr 
Christy Iva W 
Christy Jas A 
Christy Nan— H 
Church Fred— U 
Clair Roy— M 
Claire Gertrude— I 
Clancy Geo— F 
Clark PI— 8 . 
Clark Harvey— Am 
Cltrk J Kins 
Clark Margt— FP 
Clark Rodfleld 
Clarke Geo— P 
Clary Chaa— L 
Claypoole Milton S— 

Mllo 
Clayton Ethel — Wld 
Clayton Marguerite— 

— Ba 
Clements Hal— Dot 
Cliffs Henry C 
Clifford Ruth — U 
Clifford Wm 
Clifton Elmer— FA 
Cllne Ed P— Dot PA 
Close Ivy 
Cloy May— Am 
Clugston Robt — P 
Coakfey John— Dct 
Cobb Edmund P— Bo 
Cochrane Geo— Dct U 
Cody Lewis J— MM 
Coghlan Rose— IV 
Cohan Geo M— Art 
Collier Constance 
Collier Eddie 
Collier Bmile 
Cilller Wm 

Collins Jno H— Dct M 
Collins Jose 
Collins' Wm 
Colwell Goldie 
Commerford Thos — Bs 
Compton Chas 
Concord Chester Co— 

Key 
Conklln Wm — L 
Connelly Bobby — VI 
Cbnnell Grayce V — 

Key 
Connolly B J— M 
Conway Jack— Dct U 
Cook Lllllan-^CKY 
Cooke Bthlye— Th 

Cooley Prk— Dct 
Cooley Hal— U 
Cooper Claude H— Th 
Cooper Gee— VI 
Cooper Miriam 
Corbet! Wm D 
Corcoran Ethel M 
Cornellna Bess 
Cortes Armand p 
Costello Maurice O W 

— Brb 
Coodray PsgeT— U 
Courtlelgh Wm Jr 
Ceurtot Marguerite — 

PP 
Cowan Joe— Vim 
Coyle WalUr V— Dct 
Cosine Arthur— VI 
Craig Chas— F 
Craig Nell— Bo 
Crampton Howard— U 
Crane Harry P— u 
Crawford Florence 
Crawley Constance 
Crehan Joe— P 
Crlmmlns Dan— Kl 
Crittenden Trockwoott 

D— U 
Crompton Prank — Dct 

Hor 

Crosthwalthe Ivy — 

Key 
Crowe Eleanor— F 
C rowel 1 Josephine B 

— FA 
Cruse James 
Cummlngs Geo F — U 
Cummlngs Jrvlng 
Cummlngs Robt 
Cunard Grace — V 
Cunard Mine— IT 
Cuneo Lester— York-M 
Curan Thos A— Th 
Currier Frk— M 
Curtis Allen— Dct U 

D 

D' A 1 brook 8ldney 
Dale Helene 
Daly Arnold 
Dalton Dorothy— T 
-F**!y CJaiA- I^-AT 
&a\f James L — Am 
Daly Wm R— Dct 
Dana Viola— M 
Daniels Bebe— Ro 
Daniel Frk— VI 
Darlen Frk 
Darkfeathor Mona 



Dark Cloud— P 
Darling Grace— in 
Darling Ida— FP 
Darmond Grace— As-P 
Davenport Alios— Key 
Davenport Blanche 
Davenport Chao B— 
Dot 

Davenport Dorothy — U 
Davey Horace — Dot 

Chr 
Davidson Jno— Wld 
Davidson Max— PA 
Davidson Wm B— M 
Davleo Howard 
Davlo Bdwardo 
Davio Mottle— U 

8avls Ulysses Dct 
avis Wm 8 — Dct P 
Daw Marjorle— L 
Dawley J Bearle— Dot 

PP 
Dawn Hasel — PP 
Day Bingham — Dot 
Day Joel 
Days June 
Dayton Prk— Bo 
Dean Paxon M 
Dean Jack— L 
Dean Julia 
Dean Prlscllla— U 
Dean Ralph— Dct Pro 
Dean Rosemary 
Dean Ted — Pro 
Dearholt Aahton — Am 
DeCarlton Grace — Th 
DeCarlton Geo— P 
DeCamp Prk — P 
Decker Katnryn B 
DeCordoba Pedro 
DeCordova Rudolph— 

Key 
DeOarde Adele— VI 
DeOraaoe Joe— Dct U 
DeGraooe Baml A— FA 
Do Haven Carter — U 
Delaney Bert' 
Ddaney Leo 
Delaro Hattle 
DeLjnoky Victor 
DeMllle Cecil— Dot L 
DeMllle Wm C— Dct L 
Demore Harry C^-U 
Dentler Marlon 
Denver Vera 
DeRue Carmen — PA 
Desmond Wm — I-T 
Dlckeraon Jennie 
Dlckerson Lydla— P 
Dletl Prank H— boa 
DlUlon, Jno Webb— P 
Dili Max— Mu 
Dillon Edward— Dct 
Dlllod Jack— Dct Key 
Dillon Jack— FP 
Dion Hector 
Dltt Josephine 
Dolberg Cam Hie 
Don David L 
Donaldson Arthur 
Donnelly Jas A— Key 
Donovan Prk P— Dct 

Mllo 

Sore Gladys — Th 
orlsn Chas W— TJ 
Doro Marie— L 
Douglas Jas 8 — Dct 
Douglas Watkyns 
Doumler Jack 
Dowllng Jos — I 
Dowlan Wm C — Dct 



Dressier Marie— Mu 
Drew Cora 

grew Lillian— Ba 
row Mro Sydney— M 
Drew Sidney — M 
Drew 8 Rankin— Dct 

Dubrey Clare— U 
Du Cello Counteoo — U 
Dudley Chaa— boa 
Duffy Jack— St 
Dunaeuw Nlcholao 
Dunbor Helen — M 
Dunbar Robt M 
Duncan Albt E— K 
Duncan Wm — VI 
Duncanson Harry L— 

Bs 
Duns John J — P 
Dunn Wm R— VI 
Dupont Joyce K 
Durfee Mints— Key 
Durham Lewie— I 
Duquett Yolande— Sun 
Dwan Allan— Dct Gol 

E 
Eagle Oscar — Dct Got 
Eagles Jennae' — Th 
Earle Edward 
Barle Josephine 
Esrle W P 8— Dct VI 
Basoa Reeves — Dct 
Bsaton Henry C — Dct 

Sddy Violet Y— U 
deson Robert 
Edwards Beverly 
Bdmondson Al — K 
Edwards Henry — Dct 

Turner 
Edwards J Gordon — 

Dct F 
Edwards Ted— Key 
Edwards Vivian— Key 
Edwards Walter— Dct 

I 
Edwin Walter— Dct 
Eldridge Chas 
Elliott Robt— M 
Ellis John 
WIU«. Jhcbt . V— J)ct . 
Ellison Marjorle— U 
Elllston Grace 
Elsworth Warren— Dct 

Am 
Elmer Clarence J 
HJlvldge June— Wld 
Blwoll Goo B— Nymp 



Emerson Jno— Dot Plo 
Emery Maude — U 
Emory May — Key 
alrio Prod— Tb 
Brlaager Prk A — boa 
Esmond* Pva 
Bstabiook Howard 
Evano Owen— Vog 
Evans Badge— Wld 
Eyre Agneo 
Byton Bessie— 8 

F 
Fahrney Milton— Dot 

Hor 
Fairbanks Douglas 
Falrbaake Madeline— 

Th 
Falrbanko Marlon— Th 
Fallon Thoo F — FP 
Farley Dorothea— Cen 
Parley Jas L — U 
Farnum Fklyn — II. 
Farnham Henry A — 

Dct 
Farnum Duotln 
Pornum Marshal — Dct 
Farnum Wm 
Farrlngton Adele— U 
Farrar Geraldlne 
Fauot Martin J 
Fawcett Geo 
Fay Billy— Ro 
Fay Hugh — Key 
Fasenda Louise— Key 
Feely Maude 
Fellows Rockllffe — 

Wld 
Penwlck Irene— FP 
Ferris Wm 
Feuhrer Bobby — FA 
Field Geo— Dct 
Fielding Romalne — 

?lelda Lew— Dot Wld 
Igman Max— Dct M 
FUson Al W— 8 
Fischer Margarita— M 
Fisher Geo — 1 
Flschback Fred— Dct 

Key 
Fisher Harry Jr— FA 
Fltsgerald Jas A— Dct 

Prl 
Fltsmaurice Geo— Dct 

P 
Fltxpatrlck Jaa A— 

Dct 
Fitsroy Louis 
Flanagan D J— CKY 
Flugrath Edna — Lon 
Flugrath Leona — Ed 
Fona Gloria— U 
Foote Courtney 
Forbes Harris L— Dct 
Forde Eugenie— Am 
"'I'rte Francis — Dct U 
Ford Harrison— Blu 
Forman Tom — L 
Formes Carl Jr 
Forrest Alloa — Am 
Forrester Mel 8 — Dct 

U 
Footer Henry D 
Foster J Morris 
Fox Harry 
France Chao H— Dct 
Francla Burt 
Francis Thelma — D 
Franck John L 
Franck Katherlne— M 
Francis Alec Bud — 

Wld 
Franey Wm — U 
Frank J Herbert 
Franklin C M— Dct F 
Franklin S A— Dct F 
Frans Jos J — Dct E A 

R 
Frsunhols Fraunle — 

M 
Frasee Edwin A— Dct 

P 
Frederick Pauline — FP 
French Chas K— I 
French Qeo B — Chr 
Frelbus Theo— As 
Frost Lorraine— M 
Fuller Dale— Key 
Fuller Mary 
Fulton Helen 



Oaden Alex — Gau 
Gall Jane— U 
Gale Alice— P 
Gallagher Raymond 
Gamble Fred A— Nee 
Garden Mary— Gol 
Garwood Wm — Dct U 
Gaston Mae — Hor 
Gavette Marie— Hor 
Gay Chss — Hor 
Gaye Howard — Con 
Gebhardt Geo M 
George Burton — Dct U 
George Geo 
George Maude — U 
Gerald Pete— LKO 
Gerald Wm H 
Gerber Neva — U 
Gerard Carl 
Gerrard Douglas — Dct 

U 
Gettlnger Billy— Pal 
Olblin Chas— Dct 
Gibson Ed— U 
Gibson Grace 
Gibson Helen— K 
Gibson Jas Edwin — P 
Gibson Margaret 
Gilbert Jack C— I 
Gilbert Wm 
'r "ttotfccr D£:k- boa 
Gillette Wm— Gol 
Gillies Simon P 
Gillespie Albt T— Key 
01 1st rone Arvld E — 

Dct Key 
Gllmore Helen— K 
Ollmoro Paul 



Glrard Joe W— U 
Olrardot Btle-ne 
Glob Dorothy— PA 
Gioh Lillian— FA 
Glaum Lou ise PA' 
Glaasmayer Albertrr 

Dct Key 
Oleason Adda 
Glendon J Fk — Rol 
Glocker Chaa P 
Godfrey Ray — Vim 
Golden Olive P— U 
Gonsaleo Myrtle— U 
Goodrich Edna 
Goodrich Kath— 8 
Goodwin Fred — LS 
Goodwin Nat C— NCG 
Gordon Alice 
Gordon Harrio — And 
Gordon Julia 8— VI 
Gordon Leo — Ed 
Gordon Kitty— Wld 
Gordon Paul — M 
Gore Rosa — Kl 
Gorman Jack — Dct 
Gould 8 Chas 
Grattan Stephen — F 
Grandon Ethel — Erb 
Grant Clay 
Grant Sydney 
Grant Valentloe — FP 
Gray Betty— U 
Gray Donald— VI 
Gray Robt H— rL 
Gran Albert 
Gray Olga 
Grandon Francis J— 

Dct U 
Grant Corlnne 
Greeley Evelyn — Wld 
Greenwood Barnett — F 
Oreene Helen — Mu 
Green Al— Dct S 
Green Dorothy — In 
Green Jos P — U 
Greene Kempton N 
Grene Margaret— USC 
Greenwood* Wlnlf red- 
Am 
Greiner Geo G — Dct F 
Grey Doris— Th 
Grey R Henry--boa 
Grey Jane — In 
Grey Katherlne 
Gribbon Harry— Key 
Griffin Frank C— Dct 

Griffith Beverly— Dct 

U 
Griffith David W— Dct 

T 
Griffith Kath— LKO 
Griffith Linda A— Pow 
Griffith Ray— Key 
Grimmer Frk — Dct Th 
Grisel Louis R— Wld 
Grlswold Jas — L 
Gules Thos 8—1 

H 

Haddock Wm F— Dct 

Goth 
Hahan Phil— In 
Haines ROM T 
Hale Allen 

Hale Albt W— Dct Clt 
Hale Crelgbton— Pow 
Hall Ella— U 
Hall Howard 
Hall James — FP 
Hall Albert 
Hall J Robertson— FA 
Hall Louis L 
Hall Shirley 
Hallam Henry 
Halloway Carroll 
Halloway Jack — Dct 

Am 
Han Harry — Chr 
Hamilton Gilbert P— 

Dct Cen 
Hamilton Jack— Key 
Hamilton Lillian— Vog 
Hamilton Loyd V — K 
Hamilton Mablon— M 
Hamper Genevieve — F 
Hamilton Shorty— Mu 
Hamll Lucille B 
Hands Bert — Dct 
Handworth Octavla 
Hanlon Alma — Ap 
Hanna Glorine — EAR 
Hansen Juanlta — USC 
Hanson Frk 
Hannon Giadvs 
Hardest? Vlolette — 

Mllo 
Hare Francis — P 
Hardin Neil— boa 
Harding Guy — boa 
Hardy Oliver N— Vim 
Harlan Kenneth 
Harlan Macey 
Harlan Otis 
Harley Edwin— FA 
Harris Caroline 
Harris Leonore — P 
Harrison A, Jr — Dct 
Harrison Ee telle— Ro 
Hart Wm S— T 
Hartford/ David— Dct J 
Hartlsan P C— Dct IT. 
Hartman Ferris — Dct 

Key 
Ilarron Robt — FA 
Harvey Harry — Dct 

boa 
Harvey John — Dct 
Hastings Carrey— Th 
Hatton Rny— L 
H.nvena Mildred— Wld 
Hawle.y l?ri)lc? . 
■Haydew ffatii— Roi 
Havdon J Chas— Dct 

Eh 

Hayes Frk— Key 
Hayes Jno J — Dct 
Hayes Tommy 
Hayes Walter A 
Hayakawa Scssue — L 






VARIETY 



23 



Hayward Lillian— 8 
Hearn Edward— TJ 
He^zlet Eva— LKO 
Herbert Henry J— F 

Heerman Victor — Dct 

Key 
Heffrou T N— Dct ion 
Held Anna 

Hennbery Jos — FA 
Henderson Lucius — 

Dct 
Henley Hobart— U 
Henry Oale — U 
Hernandez Mrs Geo— - 

U 
Herring Aggie-— I 
Hersholt Jean R — U 
Hers Ralph— M 
Hesser Caut Edw B— 

Dct 
Heyes Herbert H— F 
Hickman Howard— T 
Higby Wilbur— Con 
Hlers Walter— M 
Hill Lee— U 
Hilliard Harry— F 
Hill Maud 

Hill Robert F— Dct U 
Hinckley Win L 
Hines John— Wld 
Hitchcock Walter 
Hite Violet— Th 
Hoffman Otto F 
Hoffman Ruby 
Holding Thomas — Pal 
Holland Cecil C— S 
Hollingsworth Al 
Hollls Hylda— Am 
Holllster Alice— K 
Hollywood E — Dct Pie 
Holmes Stuart — F 
Holmes Gerda — Wld 
Holt Ed— M 
Holmes Helen — Mu 
Holt Geo— VI 
Holton Betty 
Holubar Allen J — U 
Hood Robt E L— Milo 
Hoops Arthur — M 
Hopkins Clyde B — FA 
Hopper Edna W — Wld 
Hopper E Mason — 

Dct-Mor 
Hopper DeWolf— FA 
Horan Chas — Dct-M 
Home Jas W — Dct-K 
Hotley Mae 
Housman Arthur — Tb 
Howard Ernest — Th 
Howard Harold 
Howard Warda — Es 
Howe Betty— In 
Howell Alice— LKO 
Howell W A— Dct 
Howley Irene— M 
Hoyt Ed N— Eq 
Huff Louise — F P 
Huggins Robt T 
Hulette Gladys— Th 
Hullng Loralne 
Human Billy— U 
Humphrey Oral — Dct- 

Am 
Humphrey Wm J — Dct 
Hunt Irene — U 
Hunt Jay — Dct-Nymp 
Hunter Kenneth— Fox 
Hunting Harry L 
Hurley Julia 
Hurst J>aul C — Slg 
Hutchison Craig — Dct- 

LKO 
Hutchison Wm 
Hutton Lucille— LKO 
Hyland Peggy— VI 

I 

Illlan Isolde C— Th 
Illington Margaretr- 

FP 
Ince John — Dct 
I nee Ralph— Dct Qol 
Ince Thos H — Dct T 
Ingraham Harriett — 

Hor 
Ingraham Lloyd — U 
Ingram Carl 
Ingram Rex 
Inokuchi Makato— boa 
Irving Geo— Dct-Fro 
Irving Wm — LKO 
Ivans Elaine 
Ivey Luclbella 



K 

Kaelred Kath 
Kallch Bertha— F 
Kane Gail— Mu 
Karr Darwin — Bs 
Kaufman Reg — Dct Art 
Kaufman Jos — Dct FP 
Kefe Zenfc V 
Keenan Frk — I 
Keene MatUe 
Keller Gertrude 
Kellard Ralph— P 
Kaller Bklyn— F 
Kellermann Annette— 

F 
Kelly Dorothy— Vi 
Kelly Jas T— LS 
Kelly Paul 
Kemble Lillian 
Kennedy Aubrey M— 

Dct 
Kennedy Ed — Key 
Kennedy M — Key 
Kennedy Leo A— F 
Kent Chas— VI 
Kent Crawford 
Kenton Earl C — Key 
Kenyon Doris — Es 
Kernan Henry — Dct 

Vog 
Kerrigan Jack W — U 
Kerr R P— Dct Key 
Kilgour Jos— VI 
Kimball Ed G 
Kimball Pauline G— 

So 
King Anita— L 
King Burton— Dct M 
King Carlton 8— Dix 

M 
King Henry — Diet boa 
King Leslie 
King Mollle— Wld 
Klngsburg Gladys 
Kingston Winifred 
Kirk Anne — Es 
Klrkby Olle 
Klrkland David— Dot 

LKO 
Klrkwood James — Dct 

Mu 
Kirtley Virginia 
Kleine Robt 
Knoth Howard B— 

LKO 
Kolb Wm— Mo 
Kolker Henry— KI 
Kortman Robt — I 
Kroman Anne 
Kuszewskl Hedda 



Th 



Labadle Floreac 
La Bey Louis 
Laekaye Ruth — boa 
Laldlaw Roy — Nypm 
Lamber Luclen Q — 

Dct 
Lampe Ralph C — Dct 



Jaccard Jacques— Dct 

u 
Jackson Joe 
Jackson Orrln— jf 
Jamison Wm B — Ro 
James Gladden— As 
Janecke Joh — Chr 
Jefferson Thos — U 
Jefferson Wm W — L 
Jelley Herbert B 
Jennings De Witt C— 

Fox 
Jensen Eulalle — VI 
Jewett Ethel 
Jobson Ed — boa 
Johnson Ethel — U 
Johnson Emery — U 
Johnson Mabel— I 
Johnstown J W— M 
Johnson Tefft — Dct-F 
Jonaason Frk— K 
Jones Fred C 
Jones Fred R — Dct B 

NF 
Ton ot ..J -Pasha— »L^ • • 
Jonee Rich— Dct MN 
Jose Bdouard — Dct P 
Joseph Marie — Milo 
Joslyn Margart 
Joy Ernest — I 
Joy Ernest C — I 
Joyce Alice— VI 
Julian Rupert — Blu 
Junior John — Bs 



Lampton _ .. _ 
Lancaster John — 8 
Landls Margaret C 
Langdon Lillian — FA 
Langley Bd — Dct 
La Rayne Baryne— 

Milo 
La Reno Dick — U 
Larkin Dolly 
Larkln Geo A— K 
Law Burton — U 
Law Walter — F 
Lawrence Bd — Dct 
Lawrence Jeanette 
Lawrence Paul — M 
Lawrence W B — Cor 
Lederer Gretchen — U 
Lederer Otto— VI 
Lee Chas 
Lee Jennie 
Lea Joe 
Lea Jew— F 
Lee Virginia 
Le Guere Geo 
Lehman L Thos. 
Lehrmann Henry — Dct 
Letter FrlU— F 
Leigh Lisle— F 
Lelghton Lillian— L 
Lehnberg John H — Th 
Le Nard Madeline— F 
Leon Pedro 
Leonard Robt — Dct L 
Leone Henry 
Le Roy Elisabeth— M 
I/Betrange Julian — FP 
Le8alnt Ed J— Dct L 
Le Bolr Geo— Dct 
Lester Louise — Am 
L'Bstrange-G 8— Dct 
Leslie Dick— VI 
Leslie Marguerite 
Lessey Geo A— Dot 
Levering Jae 
Levering Joe — Dct 
Lewis Bdgar— Dot 
Lewis Ida 
Lewie Kath— VI 
Lewis Jessie— Wld 
Lewis Ralph— FA 
Lewis Sheldon— Pow 
Lewie Vera 
Lewis Will — Dct Vim 
Llgon O G — Key 
Lincoln B K— Wld 
Lincoln Elmo — FA 
Llndblon Sadie 
Linden Blnar 
Llnder Max — Bs 
Llnkey Harry 
Llpson Rutb — Rol 

Ltt-Ker Aiiuv - •• - ' 

Llttlefleld Luclen— L 
Livingston Jack— KB 
Lloyd Ethel 
Lloyd Frank— Dct F 
Lloyd Harold C— Ro 
Lockney J p 
Lockwood Harold— M 
Long Walter 
Lonsdale Harry O— S 



Lorens John 
Lorraine Lillian 
Lou-Tellegen — L 
Louie Willard — F 
Love Bessie — FA 
Love Montagu— Pal 
Lovely Louise — U 
Lowry Wm A — TJ 
Luby Edna — Iv 
Lucas Herman 
Lucas Wilfred — FA 
Lund O A C — Dct 
Luther Anna — F 
Luttlnger Al 
Lydon Clarry— -Key 
Lyons Eddie — U 
Lyman Laura . 
Lynne Ethel— Chr 

M 

Mace Fred— Key 
MacDermott Maro — VI 
MacDonald Donald— 

Dct U 
MacDonald J F— Dct 

Key 
MacDonald Sherwood 

Dct Key 
MacDonald Flora- 
Nat 
MacBower Lulu — boa 
Mackenzie D— Dct 
Mackin Wm— 8 
MacLaren Mary — B1U 
MacLean Douglas 
Mack Hayward — U 
Mackay Chas 
Mackey Edward 
MacQuarrie Albert — U 
Macquarrie Murdock 

Dct 
Maddern Joe— Dct LP 
Madison Cleo — U 
Malles Chas H— U 
Mason Billy- Mu 
Mason Edmond 
Mason John 
Melons Molly— U 
Malone Violet— U 
Maloney Leo D — Dct 
Manley Marie 
Mann F rankle 
Mann Hank— F 
Mann Harry — U 
Manning Mildred— VI 
Mantell Robert B 
Mantell Robt B Jr 
Marcus Jas A — F 
Marlowe Geo W — Tb 
Marlnoff Fania 
Markey Enid— I 
Marks Lou 8— Milo 
Marsh Mae— FA 
Marsh Gene — Ro 
Marsh Margaret — FA 
Marshall Geo B— Dct 

U 
Marshall Boyd -Th 
Marshall Tuhy— L 
Marston Theodore M 

—Dct VI 
Martin Mary— F 
Martin Vivian— Mor 
Mason Jackie 
Mason Louis 
Mason Sidney L 
Mason Billy — F 
Matthews Sis 
Matthews Arthur W 

— Nl 
Maupln Erneet — Es 
Maurloe Mary B— VI 
Maude Arthur— Dct 
Maxam Louella — Key 
Mayall Herschel— F 
Maye Jimsy — boa 
Mayo Christine — Got 
Mayo Edna — Bs 
Mayo Frank — boa 
Mayo Melvin — Dct 
McCabe Harry — Am 
McCarthy Myles— Dct 
McComas Ralph 
McConnell Molly — boa 
McCord Mrs Lewis — L 
McCormack Frank — 

Dct Mu 
McCoy Harry — Key 
McCoy Gertrude 
McCoy Kid 
McCullough Phllo— 

boa 
McDaniels Geo W 
McDowell Claire— U 
McDermott John W — 

Dct U 
McDonald Francis J 

—Dct U 
McGarry Garry 
McGlll Lawrence B— 

Dct Ar 
McGlynn Frank 
McGowan John P— 

Dct 
McGrail Walter— VI 
McGregor Gordon— 

Hor 
McQuIre Paddy — Vog 
Mcintosh Burr 
McKee Raymond — M 
McKey Wm— K 
McKim Ed— Dct 
McKIm Robt— FA 
McLaughlin Florence 

—Vim 
McMackln Archer— 

Dct 
McNamara Walter— 

Dct 
McBruce Bruce 
McRae. Heqry A— T>ct . 

Mead Lydla M— Th 
Meagher J L— F 
Melghan Thos L 
Melford Geo W — Dct L 
Meredith Lois 
Merrisn Pauline 
Merecb Mary — L 
Mersereau Violet— U 
MesUyer Harry— 8 



Metcalfe Earie— Dct 
Meyere Edwin— Dct 
Michaells Fred 
Mldgley Fanny — I 
Myles Pst W— Em 
Mlder A»hlay— Dct FP 
Miller Chas— Dct I* 
Miller Rent— Vog 
Miller Walter— Field 
Mills Ed A 
Mills Frk 

Mills Thomas— Dct VI 
Mlneau Charlotte— LS 
M inter Mary M — Am 
Mitchell Doris 
Mitchell Rhea— Am 
Mitchell Yvctte— U 
MU Tom— Dct 8 
Mohan Earl J — Ro 
Monohan Jos — Juv 
Mong Wm B— Dct U 
Montague Fred 
Montgomery Frk ■— 

Dct Con 
Moon Arthur — Mu 
Moon Arthur M — Vog 
Moore Eugene W — Th 
Moore Jos — LKO 
Moore Matt— U 
Moore Owen — FP 
Moore Marcla — U 
Moore Victor — L 
Moore Lucian — F 
Moran Pauline — Key 
Moreno Antonio— VI 
Moree Max 
Moran Lee — Dct U 
Mordant Ed — Dct 
Morhange Marcel H — 

Dct CKY 
Morey Harry T— Vi 
Morley Jay 
Morris Dave 
Morris Lee — F 
Morris Reggie — Key 
Morris Richard — U 
Morrison Jas W — Iv 
Mortimer Edmund — 

Dct CKY 
Mortimer Henry 
Mower Jack— WVl 
Mulhall Jack— U 
Mullen Gordon D 
Mullen H G 
Murdoch Henry — K 
Murname Allan — Wh 
Murpsy Chas B — U 
Murray Chas — Key 
Murray Mae — FP 
Murdock Ann 
Musgrsve Billy — U 
Myers Harry— Dct Vim 
Myll Louis— Dct Kl 

N 

Nansen Betty 
Natol Florenoe 
Naslmosa Alia 
Nellan Marshall— Dct 

L 
Nelll James— L 
Nell! Richard R— F 
Nellson Jack — U 
Nelson J A — Dct 
Nelson Frances — Wld 
Nelson Margaret 
Nesbltt Miriam A 
Neville Harry M 
Newton Chas L — Am 
Newton Marie 
NlchoIIs Fred 
Nichols Geo O— MN 
Nichols Marguerite— 

Ro 
Nigh Wm— Dct M 
NUlson Anna Q 
Noble John W— DctM 
Nolan Harry— U 
Norcross Frk M 
Norden Virginia 
Normand Claire 
Normand Mabel— MN 
North Wilfred— Dct VI 
Northrup Harry 8 — 

VI 
Nowell Wedgewood— 

Blu 
Nowland Eugene— Dct 
Nye Q R— U 

o 

Oaker Jane 
Oakman Wheleer — MN 
O'Brien Oeraldine 
O'Brien John B— Dct 

O'Brien Eugene— Bs 
O'Connor Loyola— FA 
O'Connor Edward 
O'Connor Harry M— F 
O'Connor James — F 
Oland Warner— In 
O'Laughlin John C— 

VI 
Olcott Sidney — Dct 
Oliver Guy — L 
O'Neil. Nance— M 
O'Nell Barry— Dct 
Onnon Jas H— Milo 
Opperman Frk 
Orth Geo— Dct 
Ortb Louise 
Osborne Jefferson— 

Hor 
O'Shea Jas— FA 
Osterman Katberlne 
Ostrich le Muriel— Wld 
O'Sulllvan T— Dct Key 
Oswald Zamah — Dct 
Otto Henry — Dct M 
OvertAn Evart— VI 
Owen. Seen,*— TrJ . 
Owcs.-Sesca -• 

P 
Pegs Barle — U 
Paget Alfred— FA 
Pslaegologus 8 C 
Palmer Pauline — U 
Panzer Paul— Mon- 
mouth 
Pardee Madeline 
Parelle M de La 



Parke Wm Jr— Th 
Parmer Debore 
Parrott Chas— Dct F. 
Parry Fayette 
Paton Stuart— Dct U 
Paul Val— Blu 
Pavls Marie 
Pawn Doris — F 
Payne Llla 
Pay son Blanche — Key 
Peyton Gloria — boa 
Peacock Lillian— U 
Pearce George C — U 
Pearce Peggy — Key 
Pearoe Vernon — M 
Pearson Virginia — F 
Pell Bd— F 
Pemberton Henry W— 

Gau 
Pemberton Kathleen B 

—Gau 
Penlngton Ann — FV 
Peres Manuel F— Jag 
Perlolat Geo E- 4sn 
Perley Chas G— U 
Perret Leonce — Dct 

Wld 
Peters B d b oa 
Peters House— Wld 
Peters Thos K— Dot 

Wld 
Petrova Olga— *M 
Peyton Lawrence R — 

Phlllpp Adolph— Wld 
Phillips Carmen — F 
Phillips Dorothy— U 
Phillips Sam— M 
Physloc Wary— Dot 
Plckford Mary— Pie 
Pickford Jack— F P 
Plerard Jean P 
Pierrot Roger 
Pietz Lucille— boa 
Pixley Gus 

Playter Wellington- 
Con 
Polito Sol 
Pollard Harry — Ro 
Pollock Gabriel 
Potel Victor— Key 
Powell Frank — Dct 

Pow 
Powell Madeline 
Powell Paul— Dct FA 
Powell Russ 
Power Tyrone 
Powers Lena 
Poynter Beulah 
Pratt TJiibert W— Ro 
Pratt John D — Dct 
Pretty Arllne— Vi 
Price Kate 
Prince Chas H — M 
Prior Herbert 
Proctor Geo D — Dct L 
Purvianee Enda O— L 
8 

Q 

Quirk Wm A— Dot M 

R 
Rader Wm B — FA 
Radford Masie 
Raerdon Jas — Lon F 
Ralph Jessie— P 
Rambeau Marjorle— M 
Rand John — LS 
Randall Bruce 
Randolf Anders— Vi 
Rankle Caroline 
Rattenberry Harry L 

—Chr 
Rawllnson Herbert — U 
Ray Al— Dct Cha 
Ray Chas — I 
Raxeto Stella 
Rea Isabel 
Redmond Alma B 
Reed Wm W — boa 
Reed Walter C — F 
Reed Florence 
Reed Vivian— S 
Reeves Blllle — S 
Reeves Myrtle— boa 
Reeves Mary— boa 
Reicher Frk— Dct L 
Reld Jas H— Dct 
Reid Wallace — L 
Renee Alexy 
Revler Harry Dot 
Reynolds Carrie 
Reynolds Edna M — 

Vim 
Reynolds Lynn F — 

Dct Blu 
Rhodes Blllle — Chr 
Rich Vivian 
Richardson Frk A— 

Mor 
Richardson Jack— Am 
Richman Chas— VI 
Ricketts Tboe— Dct 
Ridgley Cleo— L 
Rldgway John H 
Rldgwell Geo — Dct 

Sun 
Riley Mrs B O— Dct 
Ritchie Fklyn— Mu 
Ritchie Fklyn— Am 
Ritchie Ethel A— boa 
Roach Gladys L — LKO 
Roach Bert — LKO 
Robertson John — Dct 

VI 
Robblns Marc — U 
Robblns Bdwlna 
Robertson John — Dct 

VI 
Roberts Edith — U 
Roberts Schuyler 
Ru!»*rts Th**>^-*L ' ' 
Roberts fid t 
Robertson Lollta 
Robinson Gertrude M 
Robinson Walter O 
Robinson Alan — Dct 
Robson Msy 
Robson Phillip 
Rocoardl Albert VI 
Rock Chas 
Rodin Emll— FP 



Rodney Earle — Key 
Rogers Dorothy 
Rogers Ruth— LKO 
Roland Ruth— boa 
Roland Fred 
Rooney Gilbert G — F 
Ross Chas J 
Ross David G— Milo 
Ross Milton 
Ross Msry T — K 
Rossell Mayer J — Dct 

Nla 
Rosson Helene — Am 
Rottman Victor Jr 
Routh Geo W— K 
Rowan Ruth — LKO 
Ruge Billy— Vim 
Rugglee Weeley — Dct 

VI 
Russell Dan — LKO 
Ruseell Wm — Am 



Sack Nathaniel— PIc 
8ackett Jack— U 
8ackvllle Gordon — boa 
Sals Marin— K 
Salisbury Monroe — F 
Sampson Teddy — FA 
8argent Geo L— Dot 

Am 
Sarno Hector V — U 
8aunders Jackie — boa 
Santschl Thos — S 
Sawyer Doris — Par 
Sawyer Joan — F 
8axe Templar — VI 
Scbade Betty — Blu 
Schade Fritz-— Key 
Schaefer Anne 
8 card on Paul— Dot VI 
Scbenck Earle O 
Sobumm Harry W — 

LKO 
Scott Cyril 

Scott 8idney — Dct Mor 
Scott Wm— S 
Scaly Lewis— M 
Searle Veta — Pow 
Beaver Joseph — boa 
Sesrs Alfred D — FA 
8esy Chas M— Dct 
Sedgwick Eileen— U 
Sedgwick B — U 
Sedgwick Jos— U 
Selgmann Geo— Dct F 

A 
Setter Chas H 
Setter Wm A — Dct 
Selble Evelyn — U 
Selby Gertrude — U 
Selby Norman 
Selwynne Clarissa — U 
Semon Lawrence — Dct 

Vi 
Seiuuftt Mack— Dct 

Key 
Shattuck Truly 
Shaw Brlnsley— Vi 
Shay Paula 
Shay Wm E— H B 
Shea Wm— v: 
Sheehan John — Am 
Shelby Miriam— U 
Shepard Iva — Gau 
Sheridan Frk— Wld 
Sherrlll Jack— Fro 
Sherry J B— I 
Sherwood Wm — Per 
Shields Ernie— U 
Shipman Nell— L 
Shirley Arthur— I 
Short Antrim — U 
Short Gertrude— Ro 
Shotwell Marie— Th 
Shumway Leonard C 

— U 
Shumway Walter— Reg 
Slegel Bernard 
Sills Milton— In 
Sinclair Maud— P 
Singleton Jos E— M N 
Stsson Vera 
Skinner Otis 
8 loan Wm H 
Sloman Ed — Dct Am 
Smalley Phillips— Dct 

Blu 
Smiley Jos W— Dct 
Smith Bruce— boa 
Smith C Aubrey— Fro 
Smith David— Dct VI 
Smith Hamilton— Dct 
(SmHtn jNoel M— Dct 

LKO 
8mith Sidney C— 8 
Smith Vols— U 
Smyths Florence — L 
Snow Marguerite — M 
Sothern Jean— Art 
Southern Edw H— VI 
Southern Harry 
Summerville George J 

— Key 
Spauldlng Nellie P— 

Th 
Spencer George 8 
Spencer Marvell 
Spencer Walter— Hor 
Splngler Harry— Iv 
Spong Hilda 
Standing Herbert— 

Mor 
Standing Jack— F 
Stanhope Ida 
Stanley Edwin— Th 
Stanley Forrest— Mor 
Stanley Henry 
Stanley Geo — Dct 
Stanmore Frk— I,on 
*t*ift«l. "WiZ'.li .-'If .'-' ' 
Stanton Rich— Dct F 
Staunton Virginia 
Stedman Mvrtlc— Mor 
Stedman Marshall — U 
Steger Julius 
Steppllng John— Pol 
Sterling Edith— Nev 
Sterling Ford — Dct 

Sterling Joe 



Sterling Rich— Dct U 
Stern Milton— St 
Sterrett Lee— Dct U 
Stevens Emily — M 
Stevens Howard . 

Stevens Edwin — Dct 

Blu 
Stevenson Chas E — Ko 
Stewart Anita— VI 
8tewart Roy— U 
Stinger Bill— Dct 
St John Al— Key 
Stockdale Carl— FA 
Storm Jerome — I 
Stonehouse Ruth — Bin 
Stout George W 
Storey Edith— VI 
Stowell Wm H— Am 
Stuart Julian— CKY 
Stull Walter H— Dct 

Vim 
Sturgeon Rollins — Dct 

VI 
Stuart Dixie 
Stuart Jean — P 
Sullivan Dan— M 
Sullivan Joe 
Sullivan Fred — Dct Th 
Sully Janet M 
Suratt Valeska— F 
Sutherland Ed — Key 
Sutherland Victor 
Swain Mack — Key 
Swanson Gloria — Key 
Sweeney Peggy — Es 
Sweet Blanche — L 
Swlckard Jos R — Key 

T 
Taliaferro Edith 
Taliaferro Mabel— M 
Talmadge Constance — 

FA 
Talmadge — NT 
Tapley Rose E — VI 
Taylor B F 
Taylor Lark— Vi 
Taylor Wm D — Dct 

Mor 
Taylor Jean 
Tearle Conway — CKY 
Tea re Ethel— K 
Telchman Hans M — 

Dot 
Tellegen-Lou — FP 
Templeton Margaret — 

Vog 
Tempest Tom 
Tennant Barbara 
Terriss Tom 
Terry Ethel G 
Terwllliger Geo — Dct 
Thsrp Norman — As 
Thatcher Evelyn — LS 
Thayer Otis B — Dct 
Theby Rosemary — Vim 
Thomas Al F 
Thompson David H — 

Rol 
Thompson Harriet M 

— F 
Thompson Nicholas J 

— Erb 
Thompson Margaret — 

I 
Thompson Fred A — 

Dot VI 
Thome Frk A— Dct 

Am 
Thome Llzette — Am 
Thomas None — I 
Thurman Mary — Key 
Tldmarsh Ferd 
Titjen Lester C — Dct 
Tletse Court — Hor 
Tlghe Cspt G F 
Tllton Bd B — Dct Lib 
Tlmayo Mlneto— In 
Tlncher Fay — FA 
Titheradge Dion— Wld 
Titus Lydia — U 
Todd Harry— Ro 
Tomsk Jack— U 
Toncray Kate— FA 
Tooker Wm H— F 
Totten Jos B — Dct 
Touraeur Maurice— 

Dct Pick 
Travers Rich C— Bs 
Tracey Thos F 
Tracy Bert— Vim 
Trask Weyland— Key 
Traverse Madeline— 

Wld 
Trevor 01 — VI 
Tree Sir H B — FA 
Trimble Larry — Dct 
Truax Sarah 
Truex Ernest 
Trunnelle Mabel 
Truesdell Chas F— 

Wld 
Tucker Rich 
Tuey Bert 
Tulla Bella— Th 
Tully Ethel M 
Turner D H — Dot 
Turner Jeanette— FA 
Turner Florence 
Turner F A— F A 
Turner Otis— Dct F 
Turner Wm H 
Turpln 8ally— U 
Turpln Sue— U 
Turpln Ben— Mu 

u 

Ullam Ethel— I 
Underbill John O 
Ulrlch Leo no re — L 

V 

„Ys> Lon'tie 
-Vato 7<ravrri*^-r*t V/ld 
Valentine Grace— FP 
Valkyrlrn 
Valll Valll 

Van Burrn Arch H — F 
Van Buren Mabel— L 
Van Bunen Cortland — 

Dot VI 
Vane Denton— VI 
Van Epps Jack— Pe r 
Van Beatrice— Pol 



Van Polly 
Van Waiiy— VI 
Vanet Mabel 
Vaughn Robt — Th 
Vekroff Perry Dct VI 
Vernon Bobble — Key 
Vemon Agnes — Blu 
Vignola Robt G — Dct 
Vincent Jas— Dct F 
Vincent Florence — I 
Vivian Robt 
Voices Harry 
Von Meter Harry — Am 
Von Racen Dorothy — 

M 
Von Stroheim Erioh — 

FA 
Von Schiller Cart— F 
Voss Frk H— LKO 
Vosburgh Al 

w 

Wadsworth Wm 
Walcott Helen— F A , 
Walker Charlotte— 

McC 
Walker Lillian— VI ; 
Walker Marie L 
Walker Robt D— M 
Wall Dave 
Waller Emllle 
Waller Jane — Chr 
Walpole Stanley D— U 
Walsh Geo W— F 
Walsh R A— Dot F 
Walsh Tom — Dct U 
Walthall Henry B— Es 
Ward Fanny — L 
Ward Irene 
Ward Lillian 
Ward Luclle 
Ward Tom * 

Warde B r C— Dct Th 
Warde Fred B — Tb 
Ware Helen — 8 
Warne Howard B Jr— 

U 
Warner H B — I 
Warner Marlon 
Warrenton Lule— Dct 
Warwick Robert— Bel 
Washburn Bryant — Es 
Watson Harry Jr — Kl 
Watson Roy 
Watt Nate C— Dct 
Wayne Marie— As 
Wayne Willard— U 
Webb George— L 
Webb Hasel G— Dct 

Blu 
Webb Hszel G 
Weber Lois— Dct Blu j 
Weer Helen 
Wehlen Emmy — M 
Welgel Paul — L 
Welch Niles » 

Wellesley Chas— VI 
Wells Estelle 
Wells L M— U 
Wells May— Key 
Wells Raymond — Blu 
Welsh W J— U 
Wendell Bunny 
West Chas H— 8 
West De Jalma— VI 
West Langdon — Dct 
West Lillian M— boa 
West Marlon 
West Olive 
West Ray D — Dct I 
Wharton Leo— Dct In 
Wharton The©— Dct In 
Wheatcroft Stanhope 
Whipple Clara B— Wld 

White Glen— F , 

White -Leo — F s^ 
White Pearl— P 
Whitman Fred— boa ' 
Whltmore Mlna 
Whitney Clare— F ' 

Whltsler Margaret— U 

Whitney Clare— F 
Whltson Frk— TJ 

Whltson Bernell P— TJ 

Wilbur Crane — Hor 

Williams Chas J — Dct 
VI 

Wlllsms Clara— I 

Williams Grace 

Williams Earle— VI 

Williams Harry H— 
Dct Key 

Williams Kathlyn— 
Mor 

Williamson Robin B— 
Vim 

Wilson Ben — U 

Wilson Hal 

Wilson Lois — IT 

Wilson Marjorle— I 

Wilson Millard K— U 

Wilson Roberts — U 

Wilson Tom 

Wlnsnt Forrest 

Wlndom Laurence — 
Dct Es 

Winter Percy— Dct 

Wise Thos A 

Wlthey Chester— Dct 
FA 

Witting Arthur E— TJ 

Wolfe Jane — L 

Wood Lawrence 

Woodruff Eleanor 8 

Woodward Mrs E 

Woodward 0111 

Woodward H Guy — 
Key 

Wolbert Wm— Dct VI 

Wooldrldge Doris 

Wld . ... . 

-Wartfetagtort-Wnr-^RIa 
Wright Fred E— Dct 

Wright Helen— U 
Wright Walter— Dct 
Key 

Y 

Young Betty 
Young Clara K— CKY 
Young James — rw 
Younge Lucille— FA 



24 



VARIETY 



/f 




aUi 



^v 



WILLIAMSON BROTHERS 

Inventors, Originators and Exclusive 

Producers of Submarine 

Motion Pictures 

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT TO FOREIGN BUYERS 

THIS CORPORATION TAKES PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING 
THAT Hereafter It Will Manufacture and Market Its Own Pro- 
ductions Exclusively, and that from now on the original "WILLIAM- 
SON SUBMARINE EXPEDITION PICTURES" will be handled by 
it in all countries of the world, except the United States and pos- 
sessions. Arrangements have been perfected for the immediate sale 
of territorial rights and the exploitation of this remarkable produc- 
tion in all foreign countries. 

FOREIGN BUYERS ARE INVITED TO COMMUNICATE 
DIRECTLY WITH THE Special Representatives Whose Territories 
and Names Are Quoted Below. 

RUSSEL E. SHANAHAN 

Special Representative for Europe. 
Address Savoy Hotel. Loadoa, En*. 

STEPHAN T. KING STANLY H. TWIST 

Representative for South and Special Representative for Africa, India, 
tral America. Address Cecil Hotel. Australasia and the Orient. Address 
Aires. South 



OR WITH 

Submarine film corporation" 



•th Floor, 



Executive Offices 

Bid*., New York City, U. S. A. 

a ^^r 



J 



A CONTINUOUS TRIUMPH! 

D. W. GRIFFITH'S ~~ 
Colossal $2,000,000 Spectacle 



u 



INTOLERANCE 

LOVE'S STRUGGLE SKES 001, 



RECEIPTS WORTH NOTING 



n 



CHICAGO 



10 Weeks 
Colonial Theatre 



$123,967.75 






MILWAUKEE 



Two Weeks 
Davidson Theatre 



$21,410.50 



RICHMOND 



Three Days (Monday, |78S) 

Acadcmv of Music (Tuesday, $18S4) 

Academy ot Music (Wedbie.day, $2268) 



10 OTHER COMPANIES - ON TOUR 



Direction The Wark Producing Corporation 



General Offices: 



607 Longacre Building, 



New York 



-MUTUAL' 



"BIG STARS ONLr 

Announcing Forthcoming Attractions 
Exemplifying The New Mutual Policy 

Marjorie Rambeau Nance O'Neil 

"The Greater Woman" 



"Motherhood" 
"The Debt" 
"The Second Wife" 
"The Dolls Mouse" 

Produced by Frank Powell Pro- 
duema CorporaUon. 

Gail Cain— Mutual 
Photoplays 



"Mrs. Belfame" 
"Hedda Gabler" 
"Bleak House 1 ' 



M 



Mary Miles Minter 

"The Gentle Intruder" 

Preduoed by Amerioan Film Com- 
pany, In*. 

Margarita Fischer 

"A Knight at Tarquizzi" 
"Birds of Passage' 1 

Produced by Pollard Picture Plage 
Company. 

Edna Goodrich 

(To be announced soon) 



Charlie Chaplin — Mutual Specials 

"Easy Street" 



Whose Wire" 



William Russell 

"My Fighting Gentleman" 
"H«h PUy" 

Pr od m oe d by American FUm Com- 
pany, Ine. 

Ann Murdock 

(To be announced soon) 

by Empire AlUBtar Cor- 




me 








BRANCHES 
EVERYWHERE 

•e 



ROBERT 

WARWICK 

f©yA*»»nctriCTiT With kuevalRlAKCt) 

THEAR6YIKASf 

Sy Harvey JO HifeiM. Harriet Fori 
And Willieei. J. Burns 

• & • 

DteCCTCD BY Tut RCWWWKO 

raot w. met 



■ A PICTURE THAT HOL05 • 

■ ALL THE ELEMENTS • 
B OF SUCCESS . . • • 
a C--q>»J » 

MYSTERY- ADVENTURE 
ROMANCE ANO ACTION . 



FILM REVIEWS 



is 



MAX COMES ACROSS. 

A trade aeewlag or tae grot Issaaar-Max 
Linear wowditi was gleea oo the New York 
Boot Tssodaj morning. It Is entitled "Max 
OoaMa Atron" and a Tender nnnounoea It was 
wrltua aad directed ay tee Frenon picture etar. 
In nana* respects Under Kb ale' bid sett, albeit 
a trine older tnaa la tho former Peine days. 
Tee ploture opaaa showing him being mnnl- 

* la ale anertmeat u Peru, 
itssary of Beeanar 



Ho la waltod oa by an embaery of 
with a ooatraot oalllai for 2.000.000 franca, 
though tho portod of tho ooatraot le not men- 
Uoeed. Max agrees to some to America. At 
tho laat moment ho roado of tho sinking of 
iroao roseola aad ordora hla eervanta to 
a Ufa holt la oaoh trnnk. On hoard ho 
oomo fishes disporting themaelvee aad 
ralaw tho cry of eubmorlneo. Hla room-mate 
oa hoard ahlp gives ordora to ho awakoaod at 
five A. M. to oat tho ana rise, talllag tho 
atoward not to fall to dram him aad carry 
him oa dock, ander any elrcemstnnoss. Max 
haa tho appor horth aad fotla 111, whoroopoa 
hla companion ehaagoo plaoea, oo that tho 
atoward haa a roagh and tumhlo battle, car- 
rying Max oo dock In mleflt clothes. There la 
a lot of qnostlonahlo soaalcknsos staff, soma 
eery fanny haslnsss with tho saloon piano 
that slides hack aad forth while Max plsys at 
the eoneert, a collision. With all hands ordered 
to the lifeboats, and so oa. Apparently Under 
la aa fanny aad as expresslvs aa of yore, bat 
the scenario for his first American-mads re- 
loaoa gives him small opportanlty to exercise 
hla well-known talents. Future ■aaasay- 
Uader releases will have to be mnoh fusaler 
than the laltlal cos If Under is to rshnbllltnto 
hlmaslf aa one of the world's foremost screen 

/©to. 



v 



HE GOT THERE AFTER ALL 



The Strand to thin week showing another 
Herer Pictures, Inc. (Paramount) one-reel 
feature, starring Victor Moore, making the 
third successive weeh at that nouns for the 
Moore comedies. This Is probably the host 
oat that could bo secured for the 



Klever Cc's output "Ho Oct There After 
AH" Is the one running nt tho ttmnd at 
preetnt and the regular reissue data for It Is 
scheduled for Feb. 12. The story Is poaslbty 
more admirably aultsd to Moore's peculiar 
personality than any thus far offered aad to, 
benoe, conduces to uproarious laughter. 
Moore lores Doris Page (Emma UtUefleld), 
who receives a tsttsr from her ancle that aa- 
Isss shs Is married by midnight of her twoaty- 
flrst birthday aha wUI loss title to his estate. 
This occurs on the nftsmoon of that data. 
She accepts Moore, who starts forth blithely 
to perfect all arraagemsnts for the ceremony 
to taks place by ton P. M. In the first ptnoo 
ho la pinched for sposdlag ; mmoblsvoea 
frlsado steal all his clothes, ascsssttatlng hla 
borrowing n misfit dress suit from n friend; 
he rushss to the ceremony minus shoos; he la 
handcuffed to n polios traflc algnal and haa to 
carry that about; the prospective bride gets 
hsr hsnd caught hi a letter box and haa to 
take It with her. la spite of thess mishaps 
thsy gather la front of tho minister at pre- 
cisely UM P. h% ooly to flad the minister 
stutters, which works up Into n furious all- 
mux. Carolyn Walls wrote the scenario and 
acoompllabed whet ahe set oat to do, provide 
a story that will make people laugh. Join. 

A SQUARE DEAL 

Hugh Eltlnge ,. .Cerly le BlsokweU 

Doris Golden June Klvldge 

Mark Daabar Henry Hall 

Mrs. Trades Charlotte Oranvllls 

Ruby Tralles Muriel Ostrkne 

Hsus ...•••.•••....•••.....• . Char les Charles 

This Pssrlsas (World) feature should 
n rnre trout to tho patrons of program 
tores. It Is replete with the Bad of 
msoos" so dssr to the heart of the r sads re 
popular novels wherein to described at r 
ths rollicking, joyous partlss that are 
posed to prevail la artists* studios la 
neighborhood of Washington ■ajuara. 
York. Aad aa In all those klad of 
thsre to the struggling artist, tho 
novelist, aad there to also a girl 



It 



Now 



whom both young maw love She loves tho 
writer aad the artlat sacrifices hlmoslf to 
msks them happy. Very well carried out by 
nutbor, scensiist, director and cameraman, 
whose aamss are, respectively, L. V. Jeffer- 
son. Frances Marion, Hurley Knolos, Arthur 
Bdeson. The picture Is Ytrf effectively en- 
hsnosd through the employment of urttstle 
Ulustrnted titles. 



THE END OF THE TOUR. 



Byron Bennett Lionel 

Grace Jeoaup ...Ethel Dayton 

Col. Jeoaup Frank Currier 

"Skinny" Smith Walter Hlora 

"Belly*' Harris Richard Thornton 

Hattle Harrlaon Maud Hill 

Mm, Ryan Kate Blanche 

The current week's Columbia ' (Metro) re- 
lease Is "Ths Bad of the. Tour,** story by 



Barle Mitchell, adapted aad directed by Oss r go 
D. Baker. It la a "alow-moving" drama With 
so little action as to toko on tho ahape af aa 

of a 



las 



Ulustrutsd narrative, with the sort 

Share aad detail that could be best deathbed 
i the form of n populor novel. There la 
hardly sufficient pertinent matter to eustnln a 
full five-reel feature, and benoe tho notion 
drugs nt several points. Ths tele to sur- 
rounded by n lot of one night ntnnd theatrical 
atmosphere that bus no direct bearing upon 
tho main plot bat which hclpa to fill out the 
usual footage necessary tar ths filling out 
of n prceeat day program feature. Tho 
heart Interest tale to old, bat well acted sad 
capably directed. Lionel Barrymore la fea- 
tured aa tho star and Intelligently Interprets 
ths role of the hero. He le well supported by 
J. Herbert Frank us tho honey; Steel Day- 
ton aa the heroine ; Walter Hlers aa the eome- 
dlnn, etc But the msln credit for character- 
ising should go to Freak Currier, la tho part 
af the father of tho heroine. It la one of the 
best hits of screen character acting revealed 
hereabout la seme time. Tho few aceaos ha 
had all etood out Ilka cameos. All things 
coauMorod "The Bad of tho Tour** to oa a 
par with tho average Metro release. Sola. 



THE TERROR. 

Cbuck Connelly Jack Mulnnll 

Macule Connelly Grace ilacUeea 

Annie Maugaa Vlrglula Leo 

Jim Cauford... .............. Malcolm UMIas 

Jerome Trovers Hugh Hodmen 

Mike Tregurtha Noble Johaaoa 

"The Terror," u Universe I -lied reother 
live- rosier, scheduled for release Feb. LI la 

Elace of "Ms snd Ms Pal." might Just aa well 
ave been termed "The Ouuinea of a Great 
City" or eome other title equally aa lurid, (or 
It la one of the all ff est out and out maleo 
that haa been shown In somo time. Tbere la 
a amash and bang to It rlgbt from the etart 
and it carries all of tba thrills tbat mlgbt he 
expected In one of the old "81a ve TraBto'* 
pictures. Raymond Walls wrote and produced 
tbs picture, the scenario being adapted by 
Fred Mytoa. Jack Mulhall la the featured 
player of a caat that la both good aad bad la 
apota. Thsre Is e touch hsre aad tbere la 
the etory tbat la far from correct ee far aa 
the doings of real euro enough "gat Seag- 
ate r»" are concerned, and tbere are alee like 
faulta In the direction whlcb aland out glar- 
ingly. But aa a thriller for the teo cent houses 
It will be s surs Are riot. Tbs etory has the 
elements of appeal for the claaa that frequent 
tba cheaper theatre* it will be eapeeially 
good for New York In certain aeotloaa. for the 
atory le really more or leae baaed oa the 
Rosenthal shooting In a way, although the 
autbor haa taken the effort to awltoh several 
of his principal character*. 



TANGUAY FOR PICTURES? 

* At noon on Tuesday Eva Tanguay 
was in conference with Lewis J. Seli- 
nick, with a view to organizing a spe- 
cial film company (or the making of 
feature pictures with Miss Tnnguay as 
the star. 





ON THE BIGGEST AND MOST 
EXTRAORDINARY STATE 
RIGHTS PROPOSITION IN 
THE HISTORY OF MOV- 
ING PICTURES. 



900 IE ACUCf 




ay um outvutsju. nun 

Wa haven't n nythlng to toll you In this 
odvertleement exoopt that "20,000 
LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA" haa 
smaehnd everv record at the BROADWAY 
THEATRE In Now York City for oaoh re- 
ceipts In a given time Over $22,000.00 
n two weeka. Broke all reoorda of 
tho STUDEBAKER THEATRE, Chi- 
cago, In caeh racelpte. Tooklnovar 
$1 300.00 In tho olty of Portland, Ora„ 
with five big featuree In competition. 



B roving that * , 20,000 LEAGUES UN- 
ER THE SEA" haa no com petition. 
Wo believe that tha MONEY TAKEN 
IN conetltutee the ONLY argu- 
ment recognized by ehowmen. 
All other arguments ara BUNK. 
Extremely valuable territory atlll 
available. For Information wire 
tho STATE RIGHTS DIPT. OF 
THE 

Dnliersal Film Mfg. Company, 



LAJunarr rruc 



con 



Of 



MANUraCTDMRO 
THE UNIVKRSA 
CASL LAEMMLI. Prealeset. 

1600 Broadway. NEW YORK CITY 



P. S.-T0 STATE RIGHT BUYERS 



Wrli 



FREE Ad. Campaign Booka on thla ploture. 



26 



VARIETY 




PA GING 



Two pages of Hits that have never 
HITS. We hate to throw bouquets at 
tion of Songs ever published by One f 



a 



WHEN 



THE SONG SENSATION 

ROSIE RICC 

MA 



• 9 



LA 



III 



DA 



HOOLA 



B 



• It 



LA 



9 



By ANDREW B. STERLING and ARTHUR LANGE. 
She's a Hit in Little Italy /rod She will be a Hit any place on the bill you want to put her. 
jthe 



y and She will be a Hit any place on tbe bill you want to put ber. 1 bis is 
Can be used Single or Double. Lots of funny Extra Catch Lines. GET IT QUICK. 



a doubt the first Big "Riot" Song of 



\A/ SON 



f^ 



IIN/lEirsjT- OF" 



r A 








I 



REA 



i'.y \M)k! A 



f=/v~t 



cc 



THE GREATEST MARCH SONG EVER WRITTEN 



THAT 





MINE 




V 



By WILL DILLON, HARRY TOBIAS and ARTHUR LANGE 

Do you r em e mb er "My Little Girl"? Of course you do, You know what a hit she was. Well, wait till you meet "That Girl of Mine," you'll take 
your hat off to her. The same fellow that wrote "My Little Girl" introduced her to us. Come in and give her THE ONCE OVER. Shell make a 
hit with you and for you, too. DONT OVERLOOK THIS ONE. 



ANOTHER BIG NOVELTY NUMBER 



' Oh, You Naughty Little Girlie 

(Does Your Mother Know YouVe Out 91 ) 

You've been looking for this kind of a song for a long tune, WE KNOW, because you asked us for one. We didn't have it then, but WE'VE GOT 

IT NOW GO TO IT 



CHICAGO 

3r«d Opera Hone Bitg. 

WALTEt WILSON 



PHILADELPHIA 

136 North 9th Street 




MORR 



145 West 45th Street 



MIKE L. MORRIS. Genera] Manai 



VARIETY 



27 



M-M^^BBHk^ 



JTER 

before. And we mean it when we say 
but we think this is the Best Collec- 
ne Time. Look them Over! 






THE "CLASS" OF 1917 



"THOSE HAWAIIAN MELODIES" 

We've heard a lot of nifty Hawaiian numbers this season but this one has got 9 em all 'Topped." Nothing can stop it. It's "going over" like Niagara 
Falls. Great fast number, with wonderful doubles for Boy and Girl and Two Men. GET IT NOW. 




THIS LOOKS LIKE ANOTHER HIT 



There's Something About You Makes Me Love You" 

By BERN IE GROSSMAN and ARTHUR LANGE 

The kind of a song the Gals all fall for, you know, the heart to heart tal k stuff. It listens good to us. Come in and hear it. 

BE ONE OF THE F 1RST Great double version. 



A GREAT HEBREW COMEDY SONG 



A Face Only A Mother Could Love" 

By BERN IE GROSSMAN and ARTHUR LANGE 

One of the best character comedy songs ever written, and the beauty of it is, anybody can sing it It's a scream from start to finish. Send for R, 

or, better still, call for it— but GET IT 




CO. 



New York City 

; HOLLANDER, Professional Manager 



BOSTON 
230 Treraaat Street 
JACK MENDELSOHN 



Travailing Representatives 

BILLY JACOBS 
MILT STEVANS 
JOE GALLAGHER 



28 



"^ 



FILM REVIEWS 



PRINCESS OF THE DARK. 

Psy Herron Enid Bennett 

"Crip" Halloran Jack Ollbert 

John Rockwall Alfred Veeburg 

James Hereon Walt Whitman 

It |« unfortunate tl>at Tbotnas H. Icce se- 
lected a vehicle for MIm Enid Dennett's debut 
aa a Triangle-Kay Bee atar, tbat Is so similar 
rn story aa tbe recent Triangle release 
"Nina, the Flower Girl," wblcb, being only a 
couple of weeka old, la still fresb In the mlnda 
of a great many of those wbo witnessed 
"Princess of the Dark." It Is also to be re- 
gretted tbat the role assigned to tbe new star 
failed to carry tbe sympathy at the last mo- 
ment of tbe picture, for the general Impres- 
sion audiences will carry sway after seeing 
the festure will be of Jack Ollbert wbo played 
"Crip" Halloran, a hunched-back son of the 
town drunkard, rather than of the perform- 
ance of Miss Dennett. Dut In spite of these 
handicaps Miss Bennett's work stands out In 
the role of the little blind girl who lives In 
a world of illusion all her own, until an oper- 



ation gives her sight to her. But the work 
Is not of the startling quality that would 
cause anyone to immediately any, "The great- 
est And ever in flldom," and therefore before 
the sponsors for Miss Bennett can hope tbat 
the public will accept their atar aa auch they 
will have to hammer the fact heme with ad- 
vertising and better pictures from a scenario 
standpoint than "Princess of the Dark." The 
picture ranks with the usual run of Triangle 
releases, with the exception of the novelty In 
the way of photography. The latter is un- 
usual and the camera man will be fully aa re- 
sponsible for Miss Bennett achieving picture 
stardom as were the author and the director. 
Lanier Bartlett was responsible for the story 
and Charlea Miller directed the screen ver- 
sion. The scenes) of the "Princess of Dark" 
are laid in a email town where the little 
blind girl la the daughter of a consumptive. 
The town drunkard's son is a little deformed 
youth. The two form a friendship, and the 
little blind girl mentally pictures the crlppTe 
aa her fairy prince, and of the type of prlnoeaa 
that she has heard about from the books of 



fairy tales that her father baa read ber. 
Later when ber eight la restored she shrinks 
from tbe boy and he diet of broken heart in 
tbe cave where the two conjured up their 
fairy visions. It a simple tele that will 
Interest without causing any furor. Fred. 

BRBNON BACK AT WORK. 

Herbert Brenon, having recovered 
his health, will immediately resume 
work on the direction of his screen 
adaptation of "The Eternal Sin." 

He has effected a new business ar- 
rangement with Lewis J. Selznick, 
whereby he will not be narassed by 
business details. In future all finan- 
cial matters will be in the hands of 
Alexander Beyfuss, former secretary 
to Mr. Selznick, who becomes vice- 
president and general manager of the 
Herbert Brenon Film Corp. 



wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 

Nl%aS^?^Bl^&::;£^ 



■••.•■•■•. 



••:::-:yg^&£#£:$j 






NOTICE h EXHIBITORS 

of WORLD PICTURE! 

We hereby notify you that extra bookings 
on Marie Dressier'. u Tilhe Wakes Up* will be 
granted to World Pictures Contract holders in 
order in which applications are rece i ve d . 

Under no circumstances may extra bookings 
be permitted to inte r fe re with regular play dates 
of Franchise holders. 

Exhibitors please notify our Service Branch 
at the earliest possible moment the number of 
extra days wanted. 

LM CORPORATION 
mw voaacrrv 



•.afc*: 












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IWES- 



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CAB 



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UNIONfSlP 

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WSVIStSCf s. i. 



«st as* mum at aswsj vtuit 
is antic »cao»i sttr 

sweet a 



■ we csraistF cesser ruimt vit 
st na sew sjrtu net seiKiei 



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telBRam 



UNION! 



*■ ' ' _ m coaoaAna.* 110 " - •* 

Juf r ms ta.ta •-«• ■» * , ^ *u*tt "» "K""" 

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■iu sue wait amis is viuv 

•nrrfAo er tet 

Swiss aaaawj 



If IM SAVt 



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'••• .'v. 






THE MAN WHO TOOK A CHANCE. 

Bluebird's release for Feb. 10 Is a ripping 
good story — ratber a novelty, wltb numerous 
twists and turns In tbe plot, all going to make 
for a aurprlse finish. It is fashioned along 
the lines of tbe many successful crook plays 
that bave been produced In tbe legitimate the 
past few years. Tbe element of modern 
romance predominates and tbe hero, Franaiyn 
Favnum, baa one of tboee Douglas Fairbanks 
picture rolee. Monty Gray (Farnum) returna 
from a ten years' stay in China, meets ah old 
college chum, wbo shows him a picture -of his 
cousin, a sweet-looking girl. Monty fslls In love 
with the picture end promptly, ssys he Intends 
to make the girl his wife. He is told bis chanoea 
are amall aa the girl's mother has determined 
her daughter ahall marry a title. Monty 
alters the letter of Introduction by changing 
his name to tbat of "Lord Radlelgh." He Is 
Introduced to 'The Duke of Cannister" and 
cannot understand why the Duke doesn't know 
he le a "phony." The girl doeen't ehare her 
mother's bunch for snnexrng a title, rejects 
the Duke of Cannister and determines to test 
the courage of "Lord Radlelgh." She gets a 
bunch of cowboys from her father's ranch, 
frames up a kidnapping and sends word to 
Monty to come to her rescue. Monty goes to 
it with a will, knocks down a bunch of the 
husky western men, shoots a couple of mora 
and at the finish the girl gives him the laugh 
and shows him the gune were loaded with 
blanka. The Duke of Cannister turns out to 
be a confidence msn and In the odd Modty 
gets his girl. Written by Ben Cohn, directed 
by Wm. Worth Ington and acted by a com- 
pany of finished artists. Jolo. 



ROSIE O'GRADY. 

"Roele OGrady" la a five-reel production 
made by the Apollo Co., released by Henry R. 
Raver, with Viola Dana aa the atar. The 
picture has a story of the New York slums 
which is Interesting, notwithstanding the 
number of ideas wblcb have been used la 
other plcturee. Roeie (Miss Dana) with her 
brother Jim conduct a newsstand. They live 
together In a equal Id tenement room. She 
becomes scquslnted with a pugilist, who upon 
reaching the pinnacle of success by annexing 
the lightweight championship offers to marry 
the girl and takee ber to Europe. After a 
fake marriage be returns to the States with 
another woman, leaving tbe girl destitute. 
Tbe brother learns of the return of the pug 
through the newspapers and finds that be is 
about to be married to another girl. He lays 
for his msn, kills blm and la brought Into 
court on a murder charge. His sister returns 
to New Tork (the msnner In which she re- 
turne Is left a mystery, as she Is penalises 
while on the other slds) snd finds that her 
brother Is up for trial. She appears st the 
court in his defense. Her efforts do not save 
him and be le committed on a charge or mar* 
der In the first degree. The picture ends 
pleasingly through It all being a dream. Like 
other low life plcturee this has excessive 
action. There le a quantity of human Interest 
and for the cheaper houses It makes s suitable 
attraction. Miss Dsns plays the tough girl 
role likably, while the other members of tbe 
caet are well eulted to their parts. 

POLLYRJEDHEAD. 

Polly Redhead KDa Ball 

Lady Caroline Gertrude Astor 

Duke of Osterley Charles M alias 

John Ruflln Gsorgs Wssb 

Lady Osterley Gretcben Lederer 

Gedge-Tompklns Dick La Esao 

Edgar William Worthlngton, Jr. 

Bluebird baa made a very entertaining fea- 
ture, founded on Edgar Jepson's "Psllyooly** 
stories, scenario by B. J. Clawson, produoed 
by Jsck Conway, and calls It "Polly Redhead." 
The Rlalto le ahowlng It this week as a prs- 
relesee snd securing most satiefectory results 
with this clesn, wholesome comedy. In salts 
of ths slm pis, hesrt Interest tale that cells far 
no sex probleme, tbe director found It neess- 
ssry to resort to sn exhibition of ths nude, 
ecreenlng Polly's little baby brother emerglag 
from hie bath without a otltch of clothes oa 
him and with no sense of modeety. Tbe aaost 
natural and true-to-life thing about the plot Is 
that the rich young lawyer who befriends ths 
little red-headed youngeter of twelve, does not 
send her to a faehlonable boarding school sad 
eventually make her hla wife. On the con- 
trary, be proposee marriage to a lady of title 
and Is accepted, and st tbe finish Polly Is 
shown being courted by s boy of ber own sgs. 
Tbe plot In detail. If recounted here, would 
give an Inadequate Impression ss to ths 
vslue of tbe. festure, Its eetlmate being msde 
up of deliriously humorous titles, cxoelleat 
sctlng, srtlstlc direction snd euitable locstloaa. 
"Polly Redhead" ahould pleaee any kind of aa 
audience, from a New York Rlalto clientele 
down to the most insular nickelodeon fass. 

Jot*. 



"Sins of the Sons" Held Up. 
Cincinnati, Feb. a 7. 

Eli Guggenheim, Cincinnati business 
man, president of the Sterling Film 
Company, has filed a writ of man- 
damus in Chicago, to compel the chief 
of police there to allow the showing 
of "Sins of the Sons," a film drama 
i>ro<ti;e<eri by : t+ris com^a^y.. 

The picture was passed by tne Ohjo 
censors, but for some reason unknown 
to Guggenheim, was held up by the Chi- 
cago authorities. 



FILM REVIEWS 



29 



THE IMAGE HAKEIL 



The Thaahooear company has turned oat a 

Cloture that la very uauaual for that etudlo 
i "The I mas* Maker." a Ore- reel Patka Oold 
Rooater play la which tka cioceaiagly pretty 
and cracefu! blonde Valkyrlaa la starred: 
Tka picture la onaaual la aiaoy wave, at laaat 
for Tbaahouaer. la tka flrat plaea It raally 
aaa a atory, aad oao that la a novelty. Than 
tkara la tka production, wklok la raally ade- 

Iuate from every ataadpolot aad vary wall 
Iraetad, aad thirdly thora la tha caat, waU 
aalaetad aad qulta evenly balanced. Aa a 
wkola tka feature la ooa that could go loto 
any houaa and oompata with tha haat of tho 
program platuraa oo tho market. Tka author 
of T The Image Makar" la unnamed, but ha 
haa takaa tha thama of ralaoamatloa for 
hla tela and ha haa wotob a lota atory of tha 
moat plaualbla mannar about It In raallty 
thara aro two atorlaa la one, with tho Idoa 
of D. W. Orlfflth'a aa amployod In "Intoler- 
anoa" used aa tha methud of tolling thorn 
on tho aeroan. Flrat tha modorn thama la 
takaa and after a brief chapter, the aame 
atory aa enacted by the aame eharactera In 
tha prevloue atate. whloh waa back la 9068 
B. C. In VsTPt, la ahown. in the modem 
atory Valkyrlen la a pleture aotreaa with a 
leaning toward ecnlpt'jag. Harrla Oordon, aa 
John Arden, la bar aweetheart. They meet 
aeeldeatly aad there la a mutual recognition 
whloh haa paaaad down the centunee from 
the paat. Is the anolant tale Valkyries waa 
an Image makar la the tomba of the ■gyF- 
tlana aad Oordcn waa Prince Tea. They 
loved, but the etern old King-father forbade 
their wedding, and after the Prince dlea from 
a. wouad while trying to reacue the girl from 
the alter of aaorlflce, the girl la caat to tho 
eroeodllee. la the modern atory It la the 
mochlnatlona of a achamlng moving picture 

Producer, who la In lore with the etar. that 
aepa the couple apart. They meat la Florida 
at flrat, and then after the hero la Injured 
and the producer wine the aetreea back to 
film work by Informing her that her amaaeed 
one haa returned home to hla father, b*oauao 
the latter threatened to out the boy off If ho 
married the aotreaa, the company goon to 
■gypt to do a pletura. The boy followa aad 
It la no more than natural that tho torero 
ahoold meet In the Tory tomb aa the mummy 
of Prince Tea waa burled centurion before. 
Thla la without doubt one of the beat Than- 
houaar pioturea that haa been releaacd In 
acme time. Fred. 

EACH TO HIS KIND. 

Rhandah Seeeue Hayakawa 

Prlaceaa Nada Taunt Aokl 

Amy Dawe Tola Vale 

Colonel Maroy Srneet Joy 

Dick Larimer Bugeae Paltotte 

Goleael Dawe Ouy Oliver 

A very allm plot la utilised for tkla Leaky 
(Paramount) feature and acareely worth em- 
ploying more than a couple of reela of foot- 
age. Hayakawa, tka Japanese picture star. 
la caat for tke role of a Hindoo, educated in 
■nglaad and wkoae dignified, aarloua affee- 
tlona are trifled with by a frivolous white 
girl. He eweara eternal, relentleaa hatred of 
the white race, fomente rebellion on hla native 
aoll and la about to wreak vengeance on tke 
woman who lacerated hla feelings, when hla 
own Hindoo aweetheart atralghtena him out 
and he permlte the frlvoloua girl to go un- 
harmed. Not the usual Leaky careful ad- 
herence to email detalla. For Instance, en 
Bhgllak private, reporting to tho colonel In 
command, saya: "Mr. Larimer haant been 
heard from." The aald Larimer la the pri- 
vates superior offloer. "Bach to hla kind' 1 la 
not a flret-claas Paramount release. Jolo. 



VIRGINIA 
NORDEN 



Expert Cameramen 

FURNISHED 



CINB1IA CAMERA CLUB 



JOHN BRUNTON 
STUDIOS 

Productions of Evety 
Description 

FOE PUBLIC PRIVATE, PROFESSIONAL 

AND NON.PROFESSIONAL 

PERFORMANCES 

SCENERY. PROPERTIES, STAGE FUR- 
NISHINGS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

22$ WEST 41st STREET 
NEW YORK 

Telephone i Bryaat SPM 



THE ARGTLE CASE. 

Aacke Kaytoo Robert Warwick 



Joe Manning. . . 
John Argyla... 
Bruee Argylo.. 
Nan Thorhton. 



• •••• 



Charlee Hlnee 

Frank MoQlynn 

...Arthur Aibertaon 

Gaselle Marohe 

Blaine Hammereteln 
Freak Evana 



Maiy Majuret 

air. Hurwy •••••••..... 

Inapector ; Dogherty J« B. Flaming 

Fredarlck Krelaler H. Cooper CHSe 

Nellie Marah Mary Aldaa 

Flnley Robert V Irian 

The aureet teat of the atrength of a feature 
la the paaaage of time without the epeetator 



reallaing It. That being ao, "The Argyla Case* 
ranks as one of the beat plcturea ever pro- 
duced, for the reaaon that tha 6,500 feat hare 
been unwound before your vtalon without the 
ellghteat thought traveling through your 
mind auggeatlng the paaaage of time, ft la 
an Ideal photoplay adaptation from a legiti- 
mate atage aucccae, for tha reaaon that It 
lenda ltaelf ao perfectly to acreenlng owing 
to lte wealth of action. It marks the flrat 
release of the Robert Warwick Co. and plaoee 
the new concern firmly on Ita feet aa aarloua 
contendere In the opedal releaae field. As 
a romantlo melodrama, It la almoet bullet- 
proof agalnat criticism on the acore of In- 
consistency. Of oourae the long arm of co- 



incidence and the reach of probability have 
been allghtly yanked, but ao allgbtly aa to bo 
almoet pelnleaa. Ralph lace has done oomo 
excellent atage direction and Andre Darlatler 
exception! camera work. Mr. Warwick kae 
the "fattoat" kind of a role— that of a ro- 
mantic Amorlcan Sherlock Holmes, a very 
eesy taak for ao good a leading picture actor. 
The entire company wea aelected with rare 

!;ood Judgment, with probebly the flrat prlae 
or hlatrlonlo acreen bonore going to Mary 
Aldan In tha part of Nellie Marah. With but 
a few acenee aba made her role atand out like 
a cameo. Aa a pleture "The A r gyle Case" la 
a certain eucceee. The atrength of Ita raluo 
as a drawing card la dependent on the value 
of the name of Mr. Warwick as a potent box 
office attraction. Jo*** 



V*****^ 



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SGMLET UTTER: 

HawthorneS TJagfc and Beautiful Story 

of ad PurifeB NewMtod Has Be& 
Made Into a Master ffidoplau filled 
with Thrills and Thidte - an Eric of 
Emotion and Sentiment and 









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PE&HNT5 TH15 CBS/ifSST OP AMSJUCrW CliASSlcy WITH 

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AS PASTOR 2XMM2522AXJS 

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VH2Cl£rtRmBURZESQlJ2tV£R SHOWN JNAfUM 2A$&>ON"A&)OL mffiW&F 

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30 



FILM REVIEWS 



CRIME AND PUNISHMENT. 

Rodlon Raskolalkoff D«rwent Hall Calne 

Dounla, hU sitter Cherrle Coleman 

Hit mother Lydla Knott 

Raxamoubln Porkoyltch Carl Oerard 

Andreas Valeskoff Sidney Braey 

SoDla Marmeladoff Marguerite Courtot 

Porphylua Robert Cummlngs 

Probably the best angle for the exploitation 
of this Arrow Gold Rooster (the first of that 
brand to bo released by the Paths Preros) 

will prove to be the playing up of the star's 
name. Hs Is Derwent Hall Calne, son of the 
author of "The Sternal City" end other novels 
whlcfh hare an Immense vogue among Ameri- 
can women. The film Itself has all the de- 



fects of too screened novel — that Is to say, 
it has too much material and Its Incidents are 
eo complex that they result In absolute chaos. 
There are times during the hour or so the 
picture runs that the mind reels In Its effort 
to follow the adventuree of the hero trans- 
lated to the camera from the book of Pyoder 
DooLoevesky. In his efforts to bring the novel 
within the limits of the picture art the 
scenarist has had recoruse to all the devices 
of the new medium of expression such as fade- 
back, closeup and the like and the sudden 
transition from scene to scene Is moat con- 
fusing. To sit through ths feature Is a feat 
In mental gymnastic of no small order. In 
addition to that the Russian names are most 
difficult to hold In the mind and to make it 
still further difficult the story has an unusual 



multlolpllojty of characters. The play's 
earlier chapters have many mob scenes which 
are extremely well handled for thrills, but 
the sentimental passages rather overreach by 
piling on the pathos. The tale has to do 
with a young Russian university student, 
forced to flee after be has written radical 
pamphlets. Arrived In America he sees some- 
what the same forocs of oppression about him 
and Is led to commit murder In order to se- 
cure money to give to the poor. He falls In 
love with a young woman who In spits of her 
"past" brings about his regeneration. The 
end of the story shows the young hero enter- 
ing the Tombs prison, a climax characteristic 
of the gloomy Russian writers' outlook. 
Young Cains screens especially well and 
makes the most of his dramatic opportuntles. 






^ 












FAWRITE SCREENSMOFHVECDNTWENIS 
W^0RU)5ORE>a^STDRr0FCHlLDB00D 

MARY 

HCKFOKD 









IN HER IATEST 
ARKRWPT PICTURE 



RKBQRL" 



FROM THE PLAY BY 

ELEANOR GATES 

DIRECTED BY 

MAURICE TOURN EUR 



RELEASED 

MARCH 5th 

THROUGH 



Art craft Pictures Corporation 

729 Seventh Atfe, New York- 



- f ■ , -■ '% i ■ 



THE NEW YORK PEACOCK. 

Zona . .'. Valoska fluxatt 

B»Hjr .....Harry HTlllard 

Martin Brio Mayne 

Mrs. Martin Alios Gale 

Wlll&m Pto hfcb turned out another Veie»ka 
Suratt picture which at first glanoe appears to 
be a likely candidate for success honors, out- 
stripping sren the first effort of the Pox-fluratt 
combination. In "The New York Peacock'' 
Miss Suratt has a role that permits her to 
"Tamp" all otot the screen, wear a million 
dollars worth of clothes and jewels , and In 
general to be herself In such manner that 
there Is seemingly no acting effort necessary. 
"The New Tork Peacock" was written by 
Mary MurlllQ, who has turned out a Tery 
timely little story, touching on the tremendous 
profits that are made In war orders and the 
ease with which those that haye acquired sud- 
den wsalth get rid of It, incidentally numer- 
ous pitfalls that ars especially arranged for 
separating them from their . coin. Keneaa 
Buel directed the picture and has delivered a 
feature that Is a Tery deter plcturiaallon or 
life In New Tork as the rubes like to bellere 
It is. Frank Kugler, who manipulated the 
crank; has taken a number of shots that are 
cleTer and on the whole his photography Is 
excellent Of course there Is ths usual young 
husband, with a wife and baby, who must 
fall for the "Tamp." In this case it Is the 
son of a New BTngland manufacturer of cut- 
lery- Those who are making big money In 
turning oTer war contracts want him to oon- 
Tert his plant Into a factory for the weapons 
of war. He sends his son to New Tork to 
close the deal. The hoy falls Into the hands 
of a couple of schemers, who frame him 
against the "Tamp." The latter la working in 
conjunction with the famous gambling house 
conducted by one "Stanfleld." The boy loses 
his roll, but the Tamp falls In Iotc with him 
and tries to win it back by hocking her 
levels and playing the wheel. When she goes 
broke she decides to fleece the first man that 
Sbe meets In order to get enough money to 
"sduare" the boy. In the meantime those In- 
terested in the boy back In New England de- 
cide that there Is something wrong and the* 
father comes to the big town. He falls In 
with the "Tamp" Just as she has reached the 
decision to get money no matter what the 
cost. Then for the big scene. The father ac- 
companies her to the apartment and while 
there the boy enters. The father forglToe 
and the two return to the old homestead, 
while the "Tamp" pays to "her gambling 
man": "Aw, Hell; Let's go and eat some- 
thing," There Is no doubt but that the 
picture win be one of the big money getters 
of the year, for In addition to the "draw" of 
the Suratt name, the story has the punch that 
le liked. Fred. 



YORKE 
Film Corporation 

present* 



/ 



HAROLD 
L0CKW00D 



and 



» 



NAY ALLISON 

in 

THE 
PROMISE 



A METRO wonderplay in 5 
acts adapted from the novel 
of James B. Hendryx and di- 
rected by Fred J. Balshofer. 

By arrangement with All 
Story Weekly. 

Released on the 
Metro Program Feb. 19th 



— \ 





. .»».. 



1 J 



VARIETY 



■ 






31 



CONCERT AGENTS FARCE. 

itonc P. Scibilia, concert agent, it 
ortcd interested in a new producing 
coalpany which has placed "Stocks and 
Stockings" <s farce, in rehearsal 
■George Parsons is staging the piece 
1* will play the leading role. 



Allah** in Stock First Time. 

Bridgeport, Conn., Feb. 7. 
/Wjfhe Garden of Allah" is having its 
initial presentation in stock at the Lyric 
week. Camels were secured from 
Barnum and Bailey winter quar- 
here. 




BILLS NEXT WEEK. 

(Continued from page 15.) 




Sacramento 

ORPHEUM 
(12-13) 
bill playing 
Stockton 14-15 and 
.l^Weano 18-17) 
Orvllle Harrold 
4 Dayne 
ito 

Stanley 
Sa Adelphl 
Delmar 
_lnaw. Mick. 
JEFFER8 - 8TRAND 
(ubo) 

jPhlnt HpMt) 
(onnday opening) 
M 1st naif 
Itt Young SIS 
iby a Everdean 
Williams Go . 
'ilson Co' 
i's Tr 

St. L*als 

COLUMBIA (orph) 
lgby Bell Co 
orton a Qlasa 

Shoemaker Co 

1140* ] lower 



' • 



)k» * Bowen 

IwtnTOeorge 
ilea* Gerald* 

EMPRESS (wva) 
P mr Renees 




Silver a Duval 
Lew Madden Co 
Treat's Seals 
(One to fill) 

2d balf 
Model? DeLuxe 
Mary Melville Co 
Gonne a Albert 
John T Ray Co 
Nestor's Sweethearts 

GRAND iwva) 
La Done 
M Page Taylor 
Edward Marshall 
Plplfax a Panlo 
Chas F Seamon 
Al Fields Co 
Two Pikers 

St Paul 

ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Els a French 
Hallla-an a Sykes 
"Double Exposure" 
Belgium Girls 
Riggs a Rysn 
Rice Elmer a Tom 
"Patrla" (Film) 

St. Paul. Minn. 

HIPP (abc) 
Howard Martelle 
Cleora Miller 8 
Guy Baldwin 3 
Nash a Evsns 
Novelty Minstrels 



2d half 
Lyls a Harris 
Sterling Highlanders 
Hiat a Gear 
(Two to All) 

PALACE (wva) 
The Blondya 
Nagel a Grey 
Cloaks a Suite » 
Coakley a Dunlevy 

nevue DeVogue" 
2d half 
The Ferraros 
Jere San ford 

... tk»r Indiana 
Folsom a Brown 
i una to fill) 

Salt Lake 

ORPHEUM 

(Sunday opening) 

(14-17) 

Muriel Worth Co 
Doaohue a Stewart 
Clayton White Co 
'The Volunteers" 
Jaw Hennlng 
Burdella Patterson 
Wallace Galvln 

PANTAGES (p) 
Nanoy Fair 
"All Aboard" 
Olympia Desval 
Nouvelli Bros 
Moss a Frey 



i a Diego 

TAOES (J 



PANTAOES (p) 
Wlllard Broa 
What 4? 
Corelli a Gillette 
Military Malda 
Herbert Brooks Co 

8aa Fraaclacu 
ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Farber Girls 
Beatrice Herford 
Geo Nash Co 
Haruko Onukl 
Ames a Wlnthrop 
Male LelUel 
Howard's Ponies 
Rlggs a Wltchle 

PANTAGE8 (p) 

(Sunday opening) 
Gaston Palmar 
i Metro S 
Wilson Bros 
G ruber's Animals 
R A E Dean 

Saskatoon, Saak. 

EMPIRE (wva) 

(12-14) 

(Same bill playing 



Reglna, Sas OeB 
(15-17) 
Rambler Bisters 
"The Tamer" 
Fitch Cooper 
B Bouncer's Circus 
Isvssssk 
BIJOU (ubo) 
(Jackbouville spilt) 
1st half 
Helen Jack ley 
Brlerre a Kins 
Gue a Haw 
Bert Han Ion 
4 Kings 
Seaeaeetady, If, Y. 
PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
Mercedes 
Adams a Ouhl 
Defear a Daviee 
Be Ho Gray Co 
Berlin 81a 
Cycling Brunettes 

2d half 
Mercedes 
"At the Patty 
Fen ton a Green 
Van Cleve a "Pete" 
P a L Bruch 
Gold a Seal 

Seraatoa. pa. 

POLI'8 (Ubo) 

(Wllkes-Barre split) 

1st half 

Local 

Berger a Vincent 
Orran a Draw 
Potter a Hartwell 
Gene Greene Co 
Clark's Hawaiian* 
Seattle 
ORPHEUM 
(Sunday opening) 
Dorothy Jardon 
Tempest a Sunshine 
Corbett Shepp a Don 
Hallen a Fuller 
Flanagan a Edwards 
Marie Lo 
Witt a Winter 

PANTAOES (p) 
Dls a Dixie 
Grace Edmonds 
Mystic Bird 
Frank Fogsrty 
Berio Girls 
Mack a Veknar 
Stows Falla, 8. D. 
ORPHEUM (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Follette a Wicks 
A Nicholson 8 



Barber 4 

Kartelll 

2d half 
Harold Yates 
Three Chums 
Ward Bell a W 

Soata Bead. lad. 
ORPHEUM (wva) 
(Sunday opening) 
Transfield Sisters 
Cooper a Smith 
Julie Ring Co 
Darrell a Hanford 
Ross Bros 

2d half 
Mlaaeea Nelson 
Ralph Connors 
Hal Stephana Co 
Jimmy Lucas Co 
McGoods Tate Co 



Spokaae 

NTAC 



PANT AGE8 (p) 
Morton Broa. 
'Jungle Man" 
Amoros a Mulvey 
Daisy Jerome 
Harry Rose 
"Motor Madness" 

Sprfagfleld. 111. 
MAJESTIC (wva) 

(Sunday opening) 
Cook a Rothert 
"Around Town'* 
2d half 
Four Roses . 
Fields Keane a W 
Mr a Mrs N Walsh 
Neal Abel 
Frank Stafford Co 

Sprlagfleld. Ma. a. 

PALACE (ubo) 

1st half 
Edwards a Louisa 
Sinclalre a Gasper 
Joseph L Browning 
Master Gabriel Co 
Burns a Klssem 
Musical Festival 

2d half 
Lamb a Morton 
Edmonds a Leedum 
Earl a Curtis 
"Man Hunters" 
Cliff 8 Wills 
Karl Bmy's Pete 

PLAZA (loew) 
Tllyon a O'Brien 
Jack Gleason 
Cheyenne Minstrels 
Brown a Jackson 
Oerrllla's Dogs 



Si half 
Peerless 8 
Ferris a Jordan 
Lucky 8 Yoat 
Btons a Clear 
Wastlka 8 Understudy 

SpiiBKfleld. O. 

FAIRBANKS (sun) 
Baron LIcbtsr 
"Trip of Pleasure" 
Golden Tr 
Elliot 8 Billot 
Enid Evans Co 
2d half 
Henry Gunson 
J 8 M Hsrkins 
S Sweethearts 
Lucille 8 Frsnoas 
Woodland Girls 

Stamford 
ALHAMBRA (ubo) 
2d half (8-11) 
Fred Hlldebrandt 
Mahoney 8 Rogers 
Stewart Sisters 
McBans 
8 Romans 
"■very Man Needs" 



Syra 

TEM 



p. N. T. 

7EMPLE (Ubo) 

"At Party" 
Knapp 8 Cornelia 
Fenton 8 Green 
Van Cleve 8 "Pete" 
F 8 L Bruch 
Gold 8 Seal 

2d half K 
"Night In Trenches* 
Adams 8 Ouhl 
DsLeon 8 Davis 
Be Ho Oray Co 
Berlin 81sters 
Cycling Brunette 

CRESCENT (ubo) 
Juno Salmo 
Noha and Philips 
"Harvest Days" 

(Three to 811) 
2d half 
Sarclnette Bros 
Ooelet Harris 8 at 
Flying Venus 

(Throe to 811) 



PANTAOES (p) 
Chinese Duo 
Anthony 8 Mack 
Mr Chaser 
8 8 L Burns 
Bob FIU 8 Bob Jr 


















■ 



t . 



bluebird mmm 



PRESENT 















A Romantic Drama of 
Human Passions and the Sea 

With 

Myrtle Gonzalez, George Hernandez 

and Val Paul 

k 

Directed by Lynn Reynolds 

eaaasai^BBnaaaaaenBSBBBBaaBSjBSjSBSjsaaBBBBBBBBi 

Booked through your local BLUEBIRD Exchange or 
BLUEBIRD PHOTOPLAYS (Inc.) 
160U Broadway, New York 



~W — , fc m .Ml . • » ■ 



> J*' S** ' ' 



Tarre Haate. lag. 

HIP (ubo) 
Bollinger 8 Reynolds 
2 StOrys 

Mr and Mrs Melbourne 
Freddy James 
"Garden of Mirth" 

2d halt 
Agonal 8 Aioust 
Leroy 8 CahlU 
Bert Kennedy 8 N 
6 Waterlllles 
Leroy 8 Harvey 

Toledo 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Harry Green Co 
Capt Anson Co 
Fay 2 Coley's 8 F 
Bert Melrose 
Chas L Fletcher 
Weber 8 Dlehl 
Welsse Troupe 
Royal Gascolgnes 

ARCADE (sua) 
Raymond 8 Hess 
Elsie Mains 
Norrls 8 White 
Mme Clifford 

2d half 
Geo Davis 
Merry Married Men 
Ray Drlce 8 Fays 
Mme Clifford 

Toroata 

SHEA'S (nhO) 
Koeloff Co 
Mlnnls Allen 
Vlollnskl 
Cols Russell 8 D 
Kaufman Bros 
Wilson M Nallys 
Frank Shields 
(One to fHl) 

HIP (ubo) 
Bob Tinner 
Anderson 1 Evans 
"Midnight Follies" 
Leonard 8 Wlllard 
Yemamoto Broa 
(One to 811) 

YONOE (loew) 
Geo W Moore 
Sully 8 Arnold 
Al Burton 'a Revue 
B Thsteher Co 
Lewis Belmont 8 L 
Bennett 8 
(One to 811) 

Trawtaa, H. J. 

TAYLOR H (ubo) 

2d half (8-11) 
Selgel 8 Franklin 
Morlarty Sisters 
L Kingsbury Co 
Gordon 8 Marks 
Jupiter 8 

Tre>T, W. T t 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
The Peers 
Jsck ftfurley 
8 Sully* 
Sum Mann Go 
8 Hlckey Bros 
Melody 8 

2d half 
Noack . 
Fin 8 Fin 
"Jasper" 
E Coxngan Co 
Donovon 8 Lea 
Toots Pake 

Urlesu N. T. 

COLONIAL (ubo) 
Patterson Bros 
Rlcbsrds 8 Kyis 
(Throe to 811) 
2d half 
Victor Melange 
Fields a Bernice 
Fntlma 
(Two to 811) ' 

VanronTfr, FJ. C 
ORPHEUM 
C Ollttngweter Co 
Misses Csmpbell 
Pst Barrett 
Meredith 8 Shooter 
Frank Wilson 
H 8 A Seymdur 
Thoe Swift Co 

PANTAOES (p) 
Elizabeth Cutty 
"Telephone Tangle" 
Bellclalre Bros 
Nan Grey 
Aue Woodchoppers 
Bobble 8 Nelson 

VletoTfa, B. c. 

PANTAOES (p) 
Paulino 

Evelyn 8 Dolly 
Hugo Koch Co 
Mario Russell 
Goldsmith 8 Plnsrd 

Waaalasjtov 

KEITH'S (ubo) 
Houdlnl 

Clark 8 Hamilton 
R 8 O Dooley 
Lydell 8 Hlgglns 
Kao B Bsll 
Masle King Co 
Clifford Walker 
Danedln Duo 

W«f»rf»sjry% Coma 

POLI'8 fnbo) 
■dmonds 8 Leedum 
"Just for Instsnco" 
"CtHm?d<'&»WHl»- 
M Dahl 8 C Santo 

2d balf 
Holden 8 Graham 
Oreater City 4 
Gram Miller 8 O 
Skelly 8 Sauvaln 
■d Morton 



Waterta wi, 8. V. 
METRO (wva) 
Harry LaToy 
The Ferraros 

2d half 
Chas Glbbs 
Barber 8 Jackson 

WeatSeM. Mai*. 

GRAND (loew) 
Stone 8 Clear 
Lucky 8 Yost 
Wastlka 8 Understudy 

2d hslf 
Tllyon 8 O'Brien 
Brown 8 Jackson 
Cheyenne Minstrels 

Wheollasr. W. Ya. 

VICTORIA (sun) 
Plccola Midgets 
Robbtns 8 Lyons 
Raymond Keene Co 
Coeds 8 Verdi 
Carlos Caeaaro 
2d half 
"Jr Follies" 

Wllkee Barr*. Pa. 

POLI'8 (Ubo) 
(Scran ton Split) 

1st half 
Louis Stone 
Crawford 8 Brodoriok 
Jackie 8 Blllie 
Durkln Girls 
Amer Comedy 4 
Joe Fenton Co 

Wllllameport. Pa. 

MAJESTIC (ubo) 
Bernard 8 Janls 
Stephens 8 Brunelle 
Spencer Chartres Co 
Joe Cook 
(Two to 811) 

2d half 
"Yankee 8 Dixie" 
Temple 4 
Tulip Time Holt 
Llda McMnian 

w, 5SfcS\„?~ 

Bstelle Wentworth 
Lads 8 Lassies 
Bmbs 8 Alton 
Whiting 8 Burt 
Bert Leslie Co 
Clara Morton Co 
Wheeler 8 Dolan 

PANTAOES (p) 
Tuscano Bros 
Bernard 8 Myers 
Nlblo's Birds 
Thalero s Circus 
"Fo Mall Clerks- 
Bob Hall 

STRAND (wva) 
Blair 8 Crystal 
Ottls Corner Co 
Ous Erdman 
Sun Fong Lin Tr 

BIJOU ubo) 
rhe Asunss 
Billy Rogers 
Roger Gray Co - 

2d half 
Albert Rougere Co 
Cox 8 Joyce 
Melody 4 



*>0LI'8 (ubo) 
Lucoty 8 Costello 
Jean Moore 
Ed Blondell 8 Co 
Foster 8 Lovett 
"Man Hunters" 
w „ 2d half 
Mcintosh 8 Maids 
Burns a KIssom 
The Intruder 
Orsnyille 8 Mack 
Reddlngton 8 Grant 
_ PLAZA (ubo) 
Wsrtenburg Bros 
Rlcbtsr 8 Vldettl 
Karl a Curtis 
Stone 8 Clear 
Prlnos Kara! 

2d half 
Irma 8 Connor 
Maylka 8 Csymen 
Paine 8 Neoblt 
Musical Fsstlval 
(One to 811) 

Yoakero, If. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (ubo) 
Sam Llebert Co 
Leroy Lytton Co 
Mlgnon 
Bell A Freda 
Hill 8 Sylvanla 
Chuck Haas 

2d half 
P*n Burke 8 Girls 
"Mr Detective" 
Knspp a Cornelia 
DeVoe 8 Stanza 
(Two to 811) 

York, Pa. 

OH (ubo) 
Greta Von Bergen 
Los 8 Bennett 
Multon a De Longs 
Booth 8 Leander 

— 2d SAW 

"Hearts Are Trumps'* 
Roberts 8 Barrett 
"Bride of Nile" 
(One to 811) 

Yoaaerstowsw O. 

KVP «VW») 
De Pace Opera Co 
Shattuck 8 Golden 
7 Braacks 
Looey Haskell 
•Tao aHampasV* 
Dugaa 8 Raymond 
Oerard 8 Clark 
La Palerlea Co 






32 



VARIETY 

n = 





ANTS, ENGAGEMENTS 
SERVICE and INSTRUCTION 




WANTED TO BUY a prop Hon suit. Matt 
be one with a good name. Will also engage 
man t< plaj part of comedy lion. Bostock, 
305 Putnam Building, New York. 

FUN NY BONE NO. 4 contains the latest 
monologues, sketches for two males and male 
and female, minstrel first-parts, psrodies on 
popular songs, sidewalk patter, stage poems, 
etc Price 35 cents; or for $1 will send 
FUNNYBONE NOS. 1, 2, 3 and 4. Money 
cheerfully refunded unless satisfactory. 
FUNNYBONE PUBLISHING COMPANY. 1052 
Third avenue, New York (Department v.). 

BOOKING FIRST CLASS ACTS for cabarets 
throughout the country. BILLY CURTIS 
(General Manager), Broadway Booking Office, 
New York Theatre Building, New York City. 

TWO COMEDY singing and talking acts, in 
one, with drop. Songi written to order. Barry 
&■ Wolford. Frecport, New York. 

LEA HERRI CK, owner and producer of Hotel 
and Restaurant Reviews. Originator of this 
style of entertainment. The following Re- 
views now playing Strand Roof and Herald 
Square Hotel, New York; Rockwell Terrace. 
Brooklyn; St. Charles H tel and Grunewald 
Hotel, New Orleans; Morrison Hotel, Chicago. 
For further information, telephone Greeley 2817, 
or call 1402 Broadway. New York City. 
' CHAS. CORNELL'S PRODUCTIONS-PRIN- 
CIPALS AND CHORUS GIRLS FOR REVUES. 
STEADY POSITIONS FOR THE ENTIRE SUM- 
MER NOW BEING BOOKED. ROOM 504. 
ASTOR THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK 

CITY. > . 

' TYPEWRITING, ADDRESSING. CIRCULAR- 
IZING, MIMEOGRAPHING MANUSCRIPTS 
AND PARTS A SPECIALTY. ROSE HENRY, 
1493 BROADWAY. BRYANT 3904. 

OLLY LOGSDON. 1493 BROADWAY, NEW 
YORK. FURNISHES CAPABLE PEOPLE FOR 
VAUDEVILLE AND STOCK. BRYANT 919a 

FIRST CLASS Female Impersonator, solo 
dancer, small, graceful and beautiful make-up. 
wishes engagement in High Class Musical 
Comedy, Vaudeville or Fashion show. Ex- 
quisite wardrobe of 20 costly and artistic 
Rowns. I strictly do not misrepresent. Re- 
able managers only. J. Bernard, 615 West 
135th Street, New York City. 

NOTICE) Producers ' and Managers, Male 
Classical and Pantomime Dancer in Egyptian. 
East Indian, Greek, Burmese and original 
Novelty Solo dances. Partner or Ballet. 
Further particulars address Dancer, Variety, 
Chicago. III. 

EDDIE HART, Juvenile Comedian and Tenor 
Singer. Will accept Vaudeville or Burlesque. 
387 Blceckcr Street, New York City. ^__ 

THOMAS J. HAVEY Producer-Author, 
Musical Director (Piano— -A. F. of M), Cos- 
turner. Specialty — Cabaret revues. Reputation: 
"Useful and dependable man whose ideas are 
strictly first class and please the most desir- 
able trade." Permanent address: 124 Sunny- 
side A^£""£t_Brooklyj» i _N^ 

"Vaudeville acts written. Also sketches, 

monologues, special lyrics and melody. Have 
several good comedy acts for two, three and 
four people right now. We write — we rehearae 
—we produce and stage numbers. ROEHM A 
RICHARDS, 216 Strand Theatre Building, New 
York City. 

BORROW PBS. Excellent vaudeville act 
ready to open. Can show rehearsal, scenery 
and costumes. Handled by best agent. Good 
opportunity Big time. Address Box (2), 
Variety, New York City . 

SINGLE WOMEN (Specialties) for immediate 
work. Can place desirable chorus girls at 
all times. Chss. Price, 11 West 40th Street, 
Brysnt 8093, New York City. 

• MANAGERS AND PRODUCERS of girl acts, 
I can furnish any number of desirable prin- 
cipals snd chorus girls on short notice. Chas. 
Price, 110 West 40th Street, Bryant 8093, New 
York Cit y. 

PORTER E. POTTS, Director of high class 
aotel and cabaret attractions. Artists spply. 
Suite 12, New York Th eatre Building, N. Y C. 

EDDIE HART, JUVENILE COMEDIAN AND 
TENOR SINGER. WILL ACCEPT VAUDE 
VILLE OR BURLESQUE. 387 BLEECKER 
STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



DREW HAS AMBITIONS. 

It has been reported recently that 
Sidney Drew, whose contract with Me- 
tro was for $1,500 a week and a per- 
centage, was about to sever his service 
with Metro and organize his own film 
company. Asked about it, Mr. Drew 
said: 

"Metro has exercised its option on 
my services for another year and I 
S^atl 'frldt "DC Ifsz ' ifr.ti! >.*xt /-a:uiary, 
after which it is my present intention 
to go into the 61m producing business 
for myself, making not only pictures 



YOUNG MAN aeeka position with Motion 
Picture Company in anj capacity. Beat of 
references Experienced. Al Curtis, 853 7th 
Avenue, New York City. 

ACROBATS not over 5 feet tall. Call and 
aee me or write and atate full particulara. 
Charlie Ahearn, Princeton Hotel, New York 
City. 

MIDGET wanted by well known ventriloquist. 
Must be 3 feet or under, light weight and well 
proportioned. Harry Roae (Roome 423), Put- 
nam Building, 1498 Broadway, New York City. 

DIVING GIRLS wanted. Good salary. Muat 
have full knowledge of diving. Excellent op- 
portunity. Call at once. Room 320, Strand 
Theatre Building, between 2 and 4:30 p. m. 
George Kiltnan. 

A. SAMUELS, N6W A3TOR THEATRE 
BUILDING. Wanted for big revuea in dty 
and out of town. Male quartettes, eccentric 
teama, principal a, singers, dancera and ahow 
girls. Now engaging people for aummer sea* 
shore revuea. 

ACROBAT; state age, weight and act before, 
etc. Address ACROBAT, c/o VARIETY, CHI- 
CAGO, ILL. 

4UICK, CkMlkUs OHtLS and Principal, for 
the Merry Burlesquers. Call Room 802, 
Columbia Theatre Building, Richy W. Craig, 
New York City. 

FOR VAUbtVtLLE. Ctrl vlollnlstes ana 
braas players, also girl sfngera. Address Box 
<1), Variety, New York City. 

COfctPteER 3F MUSIC /or song lyrics. 
Write for interview. Gris Gross, Box 4, 207 
Stockto n St., Brooklyn, New York City. 

SUTtAtttE FOR CABARET AND 



CLUBS. SHERIDAN AGENCY, AL. MYER. 
MANAGER, ISC BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
CITY. 

GOOD COMEDY playlet with a ''Punch" for 
two and one, or two and two, by Known Artist. 
Prefer one with straight comedy lead (male) 
dominating though not easentisl. Give full de- 
scription and royalty expected first letter. 
Royalty baaia with privilege of paring. Act 
will receive Immediate booking. Would like 
to hear from party controlling playlet, The 
Speckled Peach,- Addreas C B. Bracken "Co.* 
407 N. Park Street, Chicago, II I. 

FOR SALE—20K4O, backhand leg drop, nertedT, 
mahogany paneled interior, reception, library' 
or atudio. Never been used. 326 Knickerbocker 
Theatre Building, New York City. 

SAILING FOR Florida and Havana, well 
known dancer will accept hotel, theatre or 
cabaret engagement In the South. All around 
dancer, ballroom, classic and Hula-Hula. Ela- 
borate wardrobe. Mile. Fifi, c/o Variety, New 
York Hty, or Yen. DeL, Jacksonville, Fla., after 
Feb. 19th. 

ASSISTANT, gentleman or lady. In theatrical 
engagement office. Investment possible to right 

Eirty. Chance to enter the profession. ESTAB- 
ISHED. Address Box 4, Variety, New York. 

TRAVELING STOCK, playing- tributary to 
New York. Investment ottered lady or gentle* 
man. Opportunity to lewr n ma nagement or be 
featured in acting. LEGITIMATE. Address 
Box 3, Variety. New York. 

YOUNYj LADY, a a partner, who can sing snd 
dance, for a vaudeville act with well-known 
comedian. Arthur Jones, csre Variety, N. Y. 

PRIMA DONNA for big vaudeville act. must 
be sble to play psrt; furnish costume. George 
Beasley, care variety, New York. 

INSTRUCTOR of Languages; Spanish, Italian 
and French taught. Learn to spesk language 
fluently by the best of instructors. Classes, 
also private lessons given st ressonshle rates. 
Sch oo l of Languages, 1270 Broadw a y, New Y ork. 

COMEDIANS - STRAIGHT" MEN. PRIMA 
DONNAS. SOITBRETTES AND CHORUS GIRLa 
FOR NEXT SEASON. ROEHM ft RICHARDS, 
STRAND THEA TR E BLDG.. N. Y. C 

GOOD SOUBRETTES AND YOUNG PRIMA 
DONNAS. IMMEDIATELY. ROEHM ft RICH- 
ARDS, 216 STRAND BLDG,, NEW YORK CITY. 

JEANE LA PELLETREAU will build you a 
"personality costume" combining old msterials 
with new ones, Gsssic dancers— I fit your per- 
sonality. 268 West 44th Street, New York City. 



in which I shall personally appear, but 
others, directed by myself and along 
my own ideas." 



BIG OFFER FOR "JOAN." 

When it was first announced through 
Variety "Joan the Woman" was to be 
staterighted, the Cardinal Film people 
received an offer for $750,000 for the 
rights to the T/ni'trd States and Canada 
for ■■ tire -picture. This flattering offer 
was, however, turned down, though 
probably the largest individual bid ever 
made for a feature. 




ALE AND EXCHANGE 



wmmmmm 



SX for 25 words* S cents oach word ovor 




BIRDS. DOGS. CATS, MONKEYS-BEAUTI- 
FUL AND WELL TRAINED STOCK: THE 
BEST THAT CAN BE OBTAINED FOR THE 
VAUDEVILLE STAGE: WILL SELL OR 
LEASE; MAY CONSIDER EXCHANGE 
CALL AND SEE THE BEST. AT MY TRAIN- 
ING QUARTERS. PROF. PAMAHASIKA, 2322 
and 2324 North Fairhill St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

GOULD I LEWIS will sell their Regal Sedan 
car, as shown in last week's Variety, at a bis 
sacrifice. Look it over at 1666 Broadway. J. 
Gould, Palace Hotel. New York City. 

COMEDY BICYCLES-AU kinds of comedy 
props on wheels. Also swell Times Square drop 
and ten trunks, all sizes. Charlie Ahearn, 
Princeton Hotel, New York City. 

IF YOU WILL outline what you want for 
Comedy. Musical or Dramatic Act, will write if 
and make no charge until accepted. BOOTH 
PLAY CO, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
Telephone Greeley 4991, New York City. 

Bid SACRIFICE. Russian Ermine coat. Coat 
$2,500. Very reasonable. Antoninette, 116 West 
44th Street, New York City. 

KLEIGEL LAMP and stand with special lens, 
Kleigel Panorama, country road. Clock work 
effect. Lamp and effect coat $175. Will sacrifice. 
Charlie Ahearn, Princeton Hotel, N. Y. C, 

WANT TO BUY some cheap string inatru- __ _ _ '* 

merits; slightly used snd in good condition. 
State hall particulara concerning aame. Write 
Instruments, Box 25, care Variety, N. Y. C 



MISS RUTH HOUSTON-Plays, Acts, 
Sketches, Monologues, written, rewritten, criti- 
cised and rehearsed. Home talent entertain- 
ments and amateurs given special attention. 
Write, call or phone. Room 315, Gaiety Theatre 
Building, New York City. _ 

A TAYLOR BICYCLE TRUNK* also denart- 
meat store wardrobes, at a sacrifice. Hand- 
some catalogue of professional trunks on re- 
quest. NEWTON TRUNK FACTORY, part- 
land, New York. * 

AUTOMOBILES-High class used cars, ftes 
me when you want a car. I can get tha car 
you want for the price you want to pay. Charlie 
Ahearn, Princeton Hotel, New York City. 

TO BUY in L C Smith typewriter, wit. 
folding typewriter table. Must be in goal 
condition snd reasonable. Henry, Box 5, cars 
Variety, New York City. ^ 

WANT WHITE SATIN SUITS, auitabla for 
akating act, for men and women, in good order. 
Need them immediately. Skater, Box 22, Va- 
riety, New York City. ^ | 

LOOKING FOR a cheap Cyclorama in light 
green; must be good Quality plush 



(5 



ood condition. Quick Buyer, Box 



ish and ta 



WANT TO BUY a plush drop in blsck or 
urple, 27x55; must be reasonsble. A. Brown* 
'ox 10, care Variety, New York City. 

UPRIGHT PIANO FOR SALE, in good con- 
dition; will sell cheap; party leaving town. 
Write Eddie Hartman, 1198 Pacific St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



REHEARSAL STUDIO, 2* hours, SI. Office 
desk room to let. Sketch and Specialty i 
written, staged: opening secured. Coachii 
all branches. HALLETT, 145 West 45th jtf 
New York City. 



ANIMAL AND BIRD CAGES. P 



fp» 




■ 



HERMAN BACH 

JEWELER 



ns 



SPECIAL FOR 
THE PROFESSION 




Hawaiian Wishbone 



Ring 




$7.00 



Domino Ring 

$25-oo 




BROADWAY and 45th ST. 

NEW? YORK CITY 

UNDER VARIETY'S OFFICE 



ROCHE AT STAR & GARTER. 

...... Cbi«(jo, Feb. 7. 

Col. William Roche has been ap- 
pointed manager of the Star and Garter 
theatre here. Col. Roche was the first 
manager of the Columbia, this city. 



Shop Window 
of Fashions 



WHERE 

INDIVIDUALITY 

EXCLUSIVENES3 
RELIABILITY 
ORIGINALITY AND 
FAIR PRICES 
REIGN SUPREME 



36 W. Randolph Stroot 
Phono Randolph 1729 

Costal ttll 
Chicago, 111. 



-up* 



MOROSCO'S ALL-ENGLfgH. 

"The Fugitive" a new drama to bi 
produced by Oliver Morosco, will have 
ar» alNEngJiatr c*8t: A cortlptTiy Wt| 
being selected this week which will go 
in rehearsal Monday. Emily Stevent 
was originally intended for the leading 
role. 






•■ 






VARIETY 



EMM 



WDM 



j ■■ ' i i ne 



* 



at 



33 






FOLLOW 
THE 
SUCCESSFUL 
PROFESSIONAL 



to the establishment 
of 

ORIGINALITY 

and 

REFINEMENT 






• 






Creations here are 
real creations not 
copies. Professionals 
who wish to be as 
successful as the fol- 
lowing should con- 
sult Mme. Kahn: 

Ellis and Bordoni 

Qark and Hamilton 

Oaire Rochester 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter 
De Haven 



■ 
■ 



< 



A visit wIE eenvfaecc 




Creator of Gowns 

On forty •Ifht Wast Forty-fourth St. 
Near Broadway. New York City. 
Four doors wost of tho Lamb's Club. 



FOOLISH FILM QUESTIONS. 

By O. M. 8AMUEL. 

Da you know wbero Douglass Fairbanks? 

Wkom does Bessie Love? 

Is Clara Kimball YouttgT 

Why don't plcturs thsstras smploy prompt- 
off? 

What sort of fountain pan does Chester 
Oonklln use? 

Do the pictures of Sir Herbert Tree grow on 
you? 

Where Is Valeaka Suratt? 

Hare you seen Helen Holmes T 

Is Louise Glaum talkative? 

Does Lillian Walker take a "constitutional" 
before breakfast? 

Is It right to add a "Q" to an Inferior Inoe 
production? 

Did Vltagrapb show their 8othern company 
In the east and west? 

! Does Betasco know more about stage-craft 
this) Griffith does sbout screen-craft? 
JjWV Anita the first or second Stewart In plc- 

I wbuld you be angry If a camera man gave 
.*•*>. JM gal Ire answer.? ,,..,.. 
: Can Frnncl* Forrt take -a Ford- Jehu? (2> 
Cap you see Ford for a Jitney? 
What line doea Grace Cunard take when she 

Caa abroad? 
Was Fannie Ward the ward of Frederick 
pros? 



If you book Triangle eerrlee will you hare a 
Hart? 

la "The Dumb Olrl of PorUcl" the moat 
silent drama? 

Have you seen Florence Rockwell In a atom 
scene? 

Is Blanche Sweat? 

Can you catch the eplaootla from an episodic 
serial? 

If fair exchange la not robber/ la it right to 
call a fair exchange man •' robber? 

Waa the fellow who Invented those abort 
names for film places a mend to the electric 
light people? 

Can a motion picture theatre nan lta opera 
glaaa privilege? 

When all the world's a screen what will be- 
come of the stage-door keepers? 



JAP PUTS. 

"If," which opened at the Fulton 
Wednesday, was the first of the pos- 
sible-war-with-Japtn plays to reach 
New York. It has a battle scene be- 
tween Americans and Japanese. 

Two other Japanese plays are under 

way. One is "The Pawn" by Joseph 

Noel. Frank Keenan is to produce it 

Paul Gordon and Regina Wallace have 

been engaged. 

Benrimo has the third, entitled 'The 
Willow Tree/' to be placed in rehearsal 

shortly. 




Feb. 12 and Feb. IS. 

"A New York Olrl" 13 Onyety Boston 19 Grand 
Hartford Conn. 

"Americans" 12 Century Kansas City 10 Stand- 
ard St Louie Mo. 

"Auto Girls" 12-18 South Bethlehem 14 Potts- 
town Ps 16-17 Grand Trenton N J 10 Star 
Brooklyn. 

"Beauty Youth 4 Folly" 12-14 Orpheum New 
Bedford 15-17 Worcester Worcester Mass 
10-20 Amsterdam Amsterdam 21-24 Hudson 
Schenectady N T. 

"Bebuaan Show" 12 Oayety St Louis 10 Colum- 
bia Chicago. 

"Bol Tons" 12 Casino Brooklyn 10 Empire 
Newark N J. 

"Bostontsns" 1S-17 Park Bridgeport Conn 10 
Colonial Providence R I. 

"Bowery Burlesquers" 12 Lyceum Dayton 10 
Olympic Cincinnati O. 

"Broadway Belles" 12 Savoy Hamilton Out 10 
Cadillac Detroit. 

"Burlesque Revue" 12 Olympic Cincinnati 10. 
Star d Garter Chicago. 

"Cabaret Girls" 12-18 Blnghamton 14 Oneida 
lft-17 Inter Niagara Falls N T 10 Star To- 
ronto. 

"Charming Widows" 12-18 Holyoke Holyoke 
14-17 Gilmore Springfield IS Howard Bos- 
ton Maaa. 

"Cherry Blossoms" 12 Acrdimy Jersey City 
10 Trocadero Philadelphia. 

"Darlings of Paris" 12 Buckingham Louisville 
Ky 10 Lyceum Columbus O. 

"Follies of Day" 12 Empire Hoboken IS Peo- 
ple's Philadelphia. 

"Frolics of 1017" 12 Lyceum Columbus 10 
Newark 20 Eanesvllle 21 Canton 22-24 
Akron 0. 

"French Frolics" 12 Star Toronto 10 Savoy 
Hamilton Ont. 

"Follies of Pleasure" 12-18 Amsterdam Am- 
sterdam 14-17 Hudaon Schenectady 10-20 
Blnghamton 21 Oneida 22-24 Inter Niagara 
Fslls N Y. 

"Ginger Girls" 12 Olympic New York 10 Ma- 
jestic Scrsnton Pa. 

"Girls from Follies" 11-18 H Torre Haute 
Ind 10 Oayety Chicago. 

"Girls from Joyland" 11-18 Lyceum Dnluth 
Minn 10 Century Kansas City Mo. 

"Globe Trotters" 12 Star ft Garter Chicago 10 
Onyety Derolt. 

'Golden Crook" 12 Casino Philadelphia 10 New 
Hurtlg d Semons New York. 

"Grown Up Babies" 12 Empire Cleveland O 
10-20 Erie 21 Ashtabula Pa 22-24 Park 
Youngstown 0. 

"Hastings Big Show" 12 Palace Baltimore 
Md 10 Gayety Washington D C 

"Hello Girls" 12 Howard Boston 10-21 Or- 
pheum New Bedford 22-24 Worcester Wor- 
cester Mass. 

"Hello New York" 12 Onyety Buffalo 10 
Corinthian Rochester N Y. 

"Hello Paris" 12 Oayety Baltimore Md 10 
Gayety Philadelphia. 

"High Life Girls" 12 Oayety Philadelphia 10 
Mt Carmel 20 Shenadoah 21-24 Majestic 
Wilkes- Barre Ps. 

"Hip Hip Hooray Girls" 12 Colonial Provi- 
dence 10 Casino Boston. 

"Howe's Sam Show" 12 New Hurtlg 4 Semons 
New York 10 Orpheum Psterson N J. 

"Irwin's Big Show" 12 Star Cleveland 10 Em- 
pire Toledo 0. 

"Lady Buccaneers" 12 Trocadero Philadelphia 
10 Olympic New York. 

"Liberty Girls" 12 Miner's Bronx New York 
10 Empire Brooklyn. 

"Lid. Lifters" 12 Newsrk )% Zanesvtlte 14 
Oaa-tor.- 13-1? Akrou 10 Empire Ctev^r.nd'-O". 

"Majesties" 12 Oayety Pittsburgh 10 Star 
Cleveland. 

"Maids of America" 12 Oayety Omaha Neb 10 
L O. 

"Marlon Dave Show" 12 Jacques Waterbury 



FURS 



Final Reductions 

Everything in the 

House at Big Savings. 

Muffs Scarfs 

$29.50 KOLINSKY $35.00 
$32.50 DYED BL. FOX $2950 
$20.00 BEAVER $15.00 
$25.00 ERMINE $25.00 
$16.50 MOLE $25.00 

$30.00 WHITE FOX $25.00 
$10.00 RACCOON $10.00 
$10.00 HUDSON SEAL $10.00 
$10.00 BLACK SKUNK $10.00 
$10.00 TAUPE WOLF $10.00 
$22.50 POIRET FOX $20.00 
$20.00 BLACK LYNX $20.00 



FUR COATS 

A selection of 128 Fur Coats 
in various lengths and styles. 

$50.00 to cMOOoOO 

Sine* U to 50 
Open all day Llacola'a Birthday 



A. RATKOWSKY 

2S-34 W. 94th Street, New York 



Conn 10-21 Cohen's Newburgh 22-24 Cohen's 
Poughkeepole NT., 

"Merry Rounders" 12 Oayety Kansas City 10 
Oayety 8t Lou la Mo. 

"Midnight Maidens" 12 Gayety Montreal 10 
Empire Albany. 

"Military Maids" 12 New Castle 18 Johnstown 
14 Altoona 18 Harrtaburg 18 York 17 Head- 
ing Pa 10 Oayety Baltimore Md. 

"Million Dollar Dolls" 12 Oayety Detroit 10 
Gayety Toronto. 

"Mischief Makers" 12 L O 10 Englewood Chi- 
cago. 

"Monte Carlo Girls" 12 Cadillac Detroit 10 
L O. 

"Pace Makers" 12 Star Brooklyn 10-20 Holy- 
oke Holyoke 21-24 Gilmore Springfield Maaa. 

"Parisian Flirts" 12 Oayety Brooklyn 10 
Academy Jersey City. 

"Puss Puss" 12 Casino Boaton IS Columbia 
New Tork. 

"Record Breakers" 12 Onyety Mlnneapolla 10 
Star St Paul. 

"Reeves Al" 12-14 Bastsble Syracuse 18-17 
Lumberg Utlea N T 10 Oayety Montreal. 

"Review of 1017" 12 Mt Carmel 18 Shenadoah 
14-17 Majestic Wllkee-Barre 10-20 So Beth- 
lehem 21 Pottstown Pa 22-24 Grand Tren- 
ton N J. 

"Roseland Girls" 12 People's Philadelphia 10 
Palace Baltimore Md. 

"Sept Morning Glories" 12 Standard St Louis 
18-20 O H Terre Haute Ind. 

"Sldman Sam Show" 12 Corinthian Rochester 
10-21 Bastable Syracuse 22-24 Lumberg 
Utlca N T. 

"Sightseers" 12 Empire Albany 10 Gayety 
Boston. 

"Social Follies" 12 Oayety Milwaukee 10 Oay- 
ety Mlnneapolla. 

"Some Show" 12-14 Cohen's Newburg 18-17 
Cohen's Poughkeepsle 10 Miner's Bronx New 
York. 

"Sneigel Review" 12 Berchel Dee Moines la 10 
Gayety Omaha Neb. 

''Sporting Widows" 12 Empire Toledo 10 Ly- 
ceum Dayton O. 

"8tar A Garter" 12 Orpheum Peterson 10 Em- 
pire Hoboken N J. 

"Step Lively Girls" 12 Grand Hartford 10 
Jacques Waterbury Conn. 

"Stone A PUIard" 12 L O 10 Oayety Kansas 
City Mo. 

"Sydell Rose" 12 Empire Newark 10 Caalno 
Philadelphia. 

"Tango Queens" 12 Star St Paul 18-20 Ly- 
ceum Duluth Minn. 

"Tempters" 12 Majestic Ft Wayne Ind 10 
Buckingham Louisville Ky. 

"Thoroughbreds" 12 Englewood Chicago 10 
Oayety Milwaukee. 

'Tourists" 12 Majestic Scrsnton Pa 10 Oay- 
ety Brooklyn. 

"20 Century Maids" 12 Oayety Toronto 10 
Gayetv Buffalo N Y. 

"U S Beauties" 12 Oayety Chicago 10 Majes- 
tic Ft Wsyne Ind. 

"Watson Billy" 12 Empire Brooklyn 22-24 
Psrk Bridgeport Conn. 

"Watson Wrothe" 12 Columbia Chicago 10 
Berchel Dee Moines la. 

"Welch Ben" 12 Columbia New York 10 Ca- 
sino Brooklyn. 

"toiito Pat" It-It Eric U Aer**bu»*. pa'I'S- 
17 Park Youngstown O 10 New Castle 20 
Johnstown 21 Altoona 22 Harrlsburg 23 
York 24 Reading Pa. 

"Williams Motile" 12 Gayety Waahlngton D C 
10 Gayety Pittsburgh. 




Keep Stage Shoes Pressed 

Your shoes come out of the trunk 
as smart and shapely as the day 
you bought them — no curling soles 
— no wrinkled uppers — 
The first flash of the spot light 
shows well groomed feet, not 
comedy foot gear — your costly 
stage shoes wear twice as long — if 
you use 













Adjustable Shoe) Treea 
For Mem and Women. 

Made of Indestructible spriag steel— durably 
enameled, weigh almost nothing— (old fat when 
not in use. Instantly adjusted to any ■ h o e . 
Slip in and out at the touch of a finger. Damp 
shoes dry quickly because of free circulation 
of air. 

Kloo Shoe Treea are 
guaranteed to straighten 
curling soles, iron out 
wrinkles, prevent cracks 
and preaerve your 
shoes for months of ex- 
tra wear. Coat 
only 50c. a pair. 



Sent prepaid any- 
where in the U. S, 




KlooManufaduringCorporatioD 

S47 W. 22nd Street, New York City , 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT. 

Next Week. Feb. 12. 

"Bringing Up Father" Orpheum Nashville 

Tenn. 
"Broadway After Dark" Lyceum Pittsburgh. 
"Come Back to Erin" Prospect Cleveland O. 
"Emmett Grace" Imperial Chicago. 
"For the Man She Loved" National Chicago. 
"Girl Without a Chance" Park Indianapolis 

Ind. 
"Hans A Prlts" Auditorium Baltimore Md. 
"Her Unborn Child" Boyd'a Omaha Neb. 
"In Old Kentucky" Garden Kansas City Mo. 
"Little Girl In Big City" Gotham Brooklyn. 
"Little Women" Walnut Philadelphia. 
"Millionaire's Son and Shop Girl" Grand 

Worcester Mass. 
"Mutt a Jeff's Wedding" Castle Sq Boston. 
"My Aunt From Utah" Lyceum Peterson N J. 
"Old Homestead" Lexington New York. 
"Pedro the Italian" Majestic Jersey City. 
"Peg o' My Heart" Lyceum Detroit Mich 
"Pretty Baby" Majestic Buffalo N Y. 
"Sis Hopkins" Poll's Waahlngton D C. 
"That Other Woman" Gayety Louisville Ky. 
"Thurston" Orpheum Philadelphia. 
"When a Girl Loves" Crescent New OrU 



"Which One Shall I Marry?" Broni New York. 



i 



LETTERS 

Where C follows name, letter is in 
Variety's Chicago office. 

Where S F follows name, letter is in 
Variety's San Francisco office. 

Advertising or circulsr letters will 
not be listed. 

P following name indicates postal, 
advertised once only. 

Reg following name indicates regis- 
tered mail. 



Abbott Miss B 
Adams Mrs Ray 
Ade Georgian 
Adler Chan J 



Aerial Macks (C) 
Alberts Nst 
Aloarons Five (BF) 
Aldrldge Georgia 
Alexander Gene 



■" " ' 






- 




'**- 



» 



»»■ ■ ■' ■ — • 



Mff If 





THE REAL RESTAURANTS AND CABARETS 



CABARET 

THE 
PLACE 

OF 
REAL £ 
FOOD 



SUPERIOR SERVICE 

GARDEN 



"SEEING BROADWAY- 
(Best Revue in New York) 



THE 
HOME 

OF 
CLEAN 

FUN 



BROADWAY, 

50th Street and 7th Avenue 



RESTAURANT 

Reasonable Prices 

I P. M. uatU 



MARIGOLD ROOM 



Most Beautiful 



Room in America 



SURPASSING IN APPOINTMENTS, ENVIRONMENT AND ENTERTAINMENT 

ANY SIMILAR PLACE IN NEW YORK 

Marigold Revue — Continuous Show Produced by Mr. Edward Bock 

Galaxy of Feature Acts and Novelty Number*— Beauty Chorus— Two Orchestra* 
FOR BOOKINGS ADDRESS MR. EDWARD BECK 

BISMARCK GARDEN 

Broadway and Grace Street. CHICAGO 



The Pre-Eminent 
Popular Price Restaurant 

rge. Beautiful Diataf 
MUSIC. 

Broadway at 48th St. 



Superior Service 

Excellent Cuisine 

Oatr Place of Its KM 

Exquisite Lwechsesi 

A la Carta Dlaaer Dishes at 

Broadway at 4Sth St. 




BEST HUNGARIAN DINNER IN THE CITY 

BE "Sf GLANTZ'S ""T^T/lt 

1I2-1M West 45th Street (Near 6th Avenue) 

No Extra ttgSJ on Sunday We Cater to the Profession 



EL DORADO 

ROTIS3ERIE— RESTAURANT 

15H-16#1 B'way 

Bet 48th and 4fth St*. 

RAZZETTI ft CELLA, Inc. 

SPECIALTIES 




Palm Careosr— Mask 
Table d'Hote Lunch 41a. 
lav. a Doss. Wl 
Opea aatH 1A.M. 



Alexander Joan 
Allen Searle (C) 
Allman-Loader Co 
Allyn R V 
Altaian Dave 
Anderson Al (C) 
Anderson Chas P 
Andrews Q B 
Arackles Billy 
Armanda Miss (8F) 
Annans (C) 
Armenian Edward 
Armstrong Lucille 
Arnold Jsck (C) 
Arnold Ruth 
-Astttvo lire Fred * 

B 
Bachera Sam H 
Baggott Jim 
Bancroft Rath 



Barnes Field (P) 
Barnes Fred J 
Barr Arthur 
Bartelett Mercedes 
Barton Frank 
Baulln Violet 
Bauvard Fred 
Baxter fed (C) 
Baxley Jack 
Bedell W H 
Beecher Wm 8 
Beeson Herbert 
Beggs Lee 
Beimel Louie (C) 
Benedict P F 
Beanejt . EYa_ 
Bennett John 
Bennett Mas L 
Benton A Clark 
Bernard Burt (C) 
Bernard Bans 



Bernle Mrs Lewie 
Berrene Fred 
Berto Marvelous (C) 
Berry a Wllheminl 
Blcknell O M 
Bllford Mr A Mrs 
Black Jim 
Blondln Bob 
Bob Tip A Co 
Bodsworth Teddy 
Bonloger A Lester 
Bonlsetti ■ 
Bonner ■ B 
Booth Laura I 
Bora Martin 
Bowen Clarence 
Boyd Bdw 
Boyd W H 
Bracbard Paul 
Bradley Kats Mae 
Brennan Joe 
Brlerry M ■ (C) 
Broad Billy 
Brohm Kathryn (C) 
Brooks Miss K 
Brooks Max 
Brooks Wslly (C) 
Brown Tom (C) 
Bryen Helen 
Buckley Irving (C) 
Buckler Henry 
Burgees Henry 
Burgess Harvey J 
Burke Charles F 
Burke Jos C 
Burkette Rath 
Burnison C C 
Burns Chss B 
Burns Bstelle (C) 



Csllshsn Joseph 
Csllls David 
Camilla Trio 
Campbell Dewey 

Carr Trio 
Carr Eddie 
Carter Chss J 
Casetta Csrle 
Challlss A Lambert 



Charlan A Charlan 

(C) 
Cheater C F (8F) 
Christie W B 
Clsre Alice H (C) 
Clark A Lewis 
Clsrk Edward 
Crark Meta 
Cloude Frank Mrs 
Clover Cbas 
Cohan Manny 
Cook A Oatman (C) 
Cole Harry 
Coleman Chas W 
Collins W J 
Conklln Chas A 
Conlee Sisters 
Conroy Lillian (P) 
Cooler Llns 
Cooper Harry L 
Corbett Lawrence 
Costell Margaret 
Coswell F 
Crlppe Kernan 
Crolman J 
Curran Bdw 
Curtain Patsy 
Curvls Nan Jack (C) 



Dal ton Tom (C) 
Daly John 
Dsrrow Duke 
Davidson John 
Davie Warren (C) 
Davis Jsck 
Dsy Csrlta 
Dean Nelson 
Decker Psul 
Deery Wm J 
De Flllce Charlotte 
Degnon Oeo 
De Orsnt Oliver 
De Oroff Mies F (C) 
Deltrlch Roy (C) 
,J>i-A-P.bo.n*.. 
Del Jsck (P> 
Delmsr Katberlne 
De Long Ms Idle 
Delores Laura (C) 
De Msteca 
De Nyla Doo (C) 



f t 



Aivad*rag.y66*St; 

Over THE BALCONADES 

GOLDEN GLADES 

FOURTH FLOOR 

Miflnif ht Parade and ExtraTagaama Ice able* 

At 7 P. Me and 12 



.1. 



1. 



D ine la a Warm Ice Pal as a ana 
Carnival Paraelo aas! Rail* ia foil wlow. ELSIE, the loo 
HARRY JOLMN and slaty 

leer for 



real lea. Soacieaa 

SAME SHOW AT MIDNIGHT 
AS AT DINNER 

Solect Yonr Own GriD Specialties in the GoUen 
Booking Manager, A. E. JOHNSON 







a 





THE SE3T ITALIAN DI NNER IN THE CITY ' 

Lonch 50 Cents f\ \ f\ f ITP/\ ^• Mer 75 Cents 

aaawsw 



GIOLITO 



With Wine 






108-1 10W.49t.Sl. \JR \/ RJR A \/ NEW TORE CITY 

THE RENDEZVOUS OF THEATRICAL'S BEST 



Dennoy Chss 
De Rosas Cats (C) 
Denton Mrs H 
De Schon Cuba (Q 
Detzel a Carroll 
Deveresux Wm 
De Vyne Dolly 
Dillon Tom 
Dixon Cliff 
Donahue Jack 
Donegan Tom 
D'Orsay Lawrence 
Dorrell Oladys (C) 
Douglas J C (P) 
Drew Beatrice 
Dual Clara (C) 
Da Bols Wilfred (C) 
Dudley Gertrude 
Duffy Margaret 8 
Dunedln J 
Dunn Arthur 
Duryea Walter B 



Barle Ralph 
Earl Maud 
Eddie ft Bdgsr (C) 
Edgar Wm (C) 
Edwards Jsck 



Edwards Ray 

El I aeon Prank 

Elliott Broomstick 

Elton Al 

cmmett Mrs J (0) 

Eriico Al 

Errloo Joe 

Espe Al 

Eugene ft Barley (C) 

Evans Edwin (P) 

Everett Q et.ru de 



Palrman ft 

(C) 
Palrweather Una 
Pearns Bob 
Fellows Effle 
Pergoson Disk 
Fields ft Minor 
Plnlsy Mr ft Mrs Bob 
Flnlay Nellie 
Fltigereld H V (0) 
Hereon Neville 
Flint Douglas A 
Fogarty Jonny 
Forbes Msrioa 
Ford Harry 
Porklns Marty (8P) 



Poster Harry (C) 
Foster Louie 
Fraabel Emma 
Francis Emma 
Franklin Wilson 
Fredericks Anna (C) 
Preltag Eddie (C) 

O 

Gallon Mrs J (8F) 
Gardener Prank 
Gary Tom M 
Gates B 
George A 
Gibson Hardy 
Gilmore William 
Ollson Hardy (C) 
Glenmore Lottie 
Gobrecht W T 
Ooldle Flo L 
Obldle Mrs B 
Ooldle Mrs Rube 
Gordon Jack 
Grady Hugh A 
Grandy Gertie (C) 
Granville Jack 



Oreaa Harrison (C) 
Grew William A <\ 

Grew Wat- A (C) 
Grey B (O) 
Grey Earl (C) 
Grey Marie (0) 
Grey Msrle (BP) 
Oriffla Clarence (8P> 
Grogan Clarence (C) 
Grogan Mrs C (C) ' 
Grundy Lee (C) 
Gulllon Mile (C) 
Gay Harry 



Hake Harry (C) 
Hall Oeo P (P) 
Hall Leona JO) 



Halllntaok Wyntt (C) 



Hardy Bros 
Hall Howard B 
Harmea Mrs T 
Haningtoa Hasal 
Harris Reba D 



AN EXCLUSIVE NEW 
LINE OF SHIRTS 
AND NECKWEAR 
NOW BEING SHOWN 

Sy.A.Horwitt,^ 

Men's Furnisher 

Broadway at 4§tJ. ft 
New York Gty 

Bryant l**t 




ALBOLENE 



^ffei^Utt*, 



^TJ 



They say that it "is the best preparation 
for removing all kinds of IRaa ssjssJ 
make-up'' anal that "it leaves the skin 
soft, smooth and free from 
AsValeae is put up in 1 sad a c_ 
to at the sbsSmmm. heai slse SB H aad 



It 

'iaahat.in 



oury bo had ef nest dnejafastt sae 
make-up. JWJ**fB rifmui. 






McKESSON A ROBB1NS 

Manufacturing 






91 Fulton Street 






New Yet* « 



VARIETY 












/ 



^- 






V4%* 



Jerome H. Remick &Oo. 

219 West 40»St.Ne»rtWtGty I 137 West Fort St. Detroit 

Majestic Theatre BkfcChicag) 



/ 



"BECAUSE YOU'RE IRISH" 

By GUS KAHN and EGBERT VAN ALSTYNE 

Come in and bear ona of the bast Irish songs in tba market. It is new. Everybody wants to bear 
an Irisb Song. Ona of Van Alstyna's bast malodies and a graat lyric by Gus Kabn. 

A FEW MORE NEW REMICK STAR NUMBERS 

"Where the Black Eyed Susans Grow" 'There s Egypt in Your Dreamy Eyes" 



By RADFORD and WHITING 

Composers of "Mammy's Littls Coal Black Rose* 
"And They Called It Dixie Lead" 
THAT'S SOME REFERENCE I t 



J By FLETA JAN BROWN and HERBERT SPENCER 

Writers of "Underneath the Stars," and this Is their 

successor. What a wonderful lyric sad melody this 

sons' contains! It's the best thins Flete Jaa Brown 

and Herbert Spencer have ever written. 



'THE WORLD BEGAN WHEN I MET YOU" 

By HUGH ALLAN— STANLEY MURPHY— ALBERT GUMBLE 

A wonderful high class song. 



fc"Shes?Dixie All the Time" 

By AL BRYAN and HARRY TIERNEY 



"Mammy si Little Coal Black Rose" 



By EGAN and WHITING 



"Who's Pretty Baby Are You Now?" "How's Every Little Thing in Dixie" 



By KAHN and VAN ALSTYNE 

"Down Honolulu Way" 

By DEMPSEY-BURTNETT and BURKE 



By JACK YELLEN and ALBERT GUMBLE 

"Just a Word of Sympathy" 

By KAHN and VAN ALSTYNE 



AND 



"IF YOU EVER GET LONELY" 

By GUS KAHN and HENRY MARSHALL 

Hera's a graat song that has just "Sneaked" its way through. Wa were wondering why tha 
song public didn't pick up this novelty and right now everybody wants it. Sand for tha bast 
single or double novelty song by that novelty song writer, Henry Marshall. 





















. 



- 






36 



VARIETY 



TV 



1111 l m , ■■■ ' ' = 



" t ■ r 



i. - r, ■■ 



t ■":' 



i .; : i 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT 









300 Housekeeping ApMrtnmts 



(d 0m tott* cuss wM* ruci d 

•I the 



Our ipW i a U y la houeekeepiaf 
seosrlslly eater «U who cm be Msurastof tm ai i sna s asd e« 
ALL BUILDINGS EQUIPPED WITH STEAM HEAT 




IRVINGTON HALL 

lid tt PIMM (IM <M. 

ef tee ■ US est type. 




• IX-** Of Weekly. 



YANDIS COURT 



MI-M7 West 4M M. 



HENRI COURT 

• 12. 114 as* lit WMI 




THE DUPLEX 




i 



Te>l» Bryant \ MS 
(7SSS 



The Edmonds 




Furnished Apartments 

CATERING EXCLUSIVELY TO THE PROFESSION 

776-78-80 EIGHTH AVENUE 

Between 47th and 48th Streets 

NEW YORK 

Private Bath and Phone in Each Apartment Office— 774 EIGHTH AVENUE 



Phase Bryant 1*44 



Geo. P. Schneider, Prop. 






FURNISHED APARTMENTS 



for Housekeeping 
Clean and Airy 
Private Bath, 3-4 Rooms 

Steam Heat and Electric Lights $8 Up 



323 West 43rd Street, NEW YORK CITY. 

Catering to the comfort and convenience of the profession 



Half block" 




THE ADELAIDE ~*^= 

754-756 EIGHTH AVE, Brt. 46th and 47th Su. 



■a. -i , .». 
SUKlIf 



«T. LOUIS, MO. 

RIOEIT HOTEL. 100 «. 14th Street 

BOMB OP THE PROFESSION 

n«f MjMDTms Wal* To all Turatm* 

KLMI|K CAMPIBLL Proo. end Mir 



HAURKE BATHSXS? 

MOST COMPLETE IN AMERICA 

nUMO ROOMS. fJYM.MASSACE OEFT.ROYCPOFTDOI 

SEPARATE ELEVATORS. PERFECT SANITATION AND 

HYOIENIC EQUIPMENT 

THE HOUSE OF SERVICE 
wnrrc ro* huboaacm uttle joummcv 
lORCSS W. O. MAURICE 



AO 



Furmshad Ap&rtmenU 
and Rooms 

Be th • SMd 




Catering to the Pr o fe ss io n 

ABBEY COURT 



124th Street 

Famished 1, 2 and 3 rooms, elevator, elec- 
tricity, hotel service, home comforts, tele- 
phone, housekeeping facilities, reasonable 
rates, restaurant- Convenient to Subway. 
Open Evenings Phone— 3766 aforningside 



. 14 and an. 
Two and th r ee re e m ifnati la, M te Is. 

COMPLETE MOUfavKEEPING 

31>W.4«khSt.,N«wYork 

TRANSFER HOTEL 






Dark and Division St*., CHICAGO 

A PUce for Porfnrsnsro Nino 

IS end tt Weekly 

WM. SMfW ATT 
Fennerty e4 Wostaaaaeear 
WU he 



Dad's Theatrieal Haiti 

PHILADELPHIA 



HOTEL 
WASHINGTON 



CHI 



(FiroprooO 



. 



Newest and Finest 
THEATRICAL HOTEL 

150 Rooms 

with bath 
Reasonable rates to the profession. 
Washington St., between La Salle St. 

Fifth Ave. 
Phone— Franklin S4M Chicago 



Harvey H 
Hawkins Jack 

Hawley Juantta 
Hawthorne Miss 
Hayes Walter J 
Hay Unlcycle 
Hearn Miss J 
Heather Mayme 
Held Jules 

genderson Billy 
epner Harry 
Herman Arthur (8F) 
Heron A Arn«jna.i\ . 
Hewitt Mrs Harry 
Hlbbert Out 
Hicks Joe (0) 
Higgles R 
Hill Olive 
Hlnkle Ooo 
Hoey Ooo (C) 
Hoffman Frances 
Hollaed* Josephine' 



Holmes Geo 
Holt Harry K 
Ho I ton Miss M 
Houghton Frank (C) 
Houlton Pat A Peggy 
Howard A White 
Howard Miss Qlenny 
Ruling Frank E 
Hume Harry (C) 
Hunley Law (C) 
Hurley William 
Husted Emma F 
FutcblnjK* AH$e., 



logalls A Duffleld (C) 



Josephs M B (SF) 
Jourdon Randall (C) 



K 

Kahoakll W 
Kaoe Lem (C) 
Kaoole David 
Kaploo J 
Kaufmao Jack 
Kay Aoea 
Keaoe P IC) 
Keatoe Myra E (C) 
Keeley Arthur 
Keeeey A Mack 
Keith Cato 
Kelgard W P 
Keillors Les 
Kelly "Thanks" 

(C) 
Kelly W A 
Kennedy A Vlnceot 
Kennedy Chas 
Kennedy Mrs E O 
Kennedy Harold 
Keogh Thos (C) 
Klndai Prince 
King A Millard 
King Mrs S J 
Kings Katberlne 
Klrksmtth Carga 
Kltamura T 
Klein Phillip 
Weinberg H H (C) 
Knight Bertha (C) 
Kotba Gerries (SF) 



Ed 



(C) 



Kramer Al 



La France Franco 
La Mar Irene 
La Mars Flying 
LaMay Marga (C) 
Lamb Fraok (C) 
Lamplnls Bros 
Lane Helen i 

Larabee A Le Page 
La Rado Viola 
La Rue Lillian 
La Rue Mildred 
Lawrence Miss Lou 
Le Clair Maggie 
Lee Addle 
Le Favor Ida 
Lehmann Geoevleve 
Lelghtoo Burt (P) 
Leighton Bert (Cj 
Lelghton Chas ( SF) 
Lennox Nat 
Leon Sisters 
Leonard Albert (C) 
Le Roy Brothers 
Leslie Geo W 
Leslie Martha 
Lester Harry J 
Levlllth Miss L 
Lewis Andy (C) 
Llllyn A Boggs (C) 
Llmean Ann 
Llnd Homer (C) 
Lindsay Cedrlc 
Lin Sun Fong 
Linton Tom 



Jennings Miss B 
Jerome Mrs 
Johnson Ally 
Jonos A Gray 



(P) 




I Used for 60 yttri by Rurs or tbs Prorcestoa. Sena 
for free HXORA staples. CaUELM sCsTTsA I 
rnt lssst U n itm nwei, w y 



DANI 



IVIEIM 



Northwest Corner 42d Street and 9th Avenue 
TWO BLOCKS WEST OF BROADWAY 



Telephone 1M2 Bryant 

NEW BUILDING 



• 



NEW YORK CITY 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

With Hot and Cold Running Water 

TELEPHONE IN EVERY ROOM 
EVERYTHING NEW 

PRICES $330, $4.00, $4.50 WEEKLY 

CAFE AND RESTAURANT SSitikSNbu 



ALL MODERN IMPROVEMENTS 
HOWER BATHS 



HILDONA COURT 

33», 341, 343, 345 and 347 Wert 45th St 

(Just off Broadway) , 

< 

(WiU be in readiness in Fetaiary) 

This 6- story high type fireproof elevator building it the final word In refined house- 
keeping furnished apartments and, like Irvington Hall, Yandis Court and Henri 
Conn, will be under the dose scrutiny of the owners. 

Daily we hear these remarks from tenants: **I am so tired of hotel life I yearn f^r 
a place that has welcome tor a greeting, that has every facility for housekeeping 
and yet has a hotel atmosphere where every request is not mercenary. The com- 
pactness of onr kitchenettes, largeness of our rooms and the attentivenese of 
our help make all this possible. 

It takes more than furniture to complete an apartment; the upkeep and maintenance 
must be imbued in the responsible beads. This has been our keynote: our reputa- 
tion for this is wide. 

Apsrtments consist of one, two and three-room suites, with kitchenettes end kitchens, 
tiled bsth with shower, telephone, vacuum system and all latest devices. 

Maid service at nominal rates will be a feature. Large closets, polished hardwood 
flooring throughout. Furniture in various woods to match. 

Rates— $13.90 Up Weekly 

For information concerning rates, etc., apply to 

YANDIS COURT. 241 West 43rd Street 

-7MI Bryant 



Litchfield Eben 8 
Lloyd Herbert (P) 
Loder Chas A (C) 
Long Bud 
Lucy Irene 
Lyttoo Nellie 



Mac Olcnnan Keoeetb 
Mack A Doris (C) 
Mack Geo E (C) 
Mack A Maybelle 
Mack Mrs E J 
Madley A Noyes (C) 
Magee A Anita 
Mahoney Will (C) 
Mains Elsie (C) 
Martin Al <P) 
Martin Dick 
Mason Evelyn 
Matteson Chas 
Maxlne Bros A Bobby 
McCarthy Sisters 
McConnell Lulu (C) 
Mcintosh Peggy 
McNamara Nell (SF) 
McNamara Nellie (C) 
McRae Thos 
McRee Sally C 
Mclvero Babe 
Melville A Rule (C) 
Merlau Mr B 
Merrltt Dorothy 
y^rry. MaJds -cf Mvlf, 
Moy«>rs Ann 
Miles Minnie 
Mitchell Elbert 
Mitchell Jobn (C) 
Moore Geo W 
Morella Mmo A Co 
Moore Billy (C) 
Moore Irene (SF) 
Moore Lucille (C) 



Mora Mr Tens (C) 
Morehouse D (C) 
Morrell Geo 
Morris Fraok 
Morrow Win 
Morse Mr J 
Mowatt Babe 
Moxley Nettle 
Mudge Leland (P) 
Munson Miss B 
Murdoch A Watson 

(C) 
Myers Anna 

N 

Nagel Geo 
Naylor Ethel (SF) 
Nelson A Nelson (P) 
Nesblt fines 
Newman Frank 
Nicholas Nellie 
Nolan Mildred (C) 
Norman May 
Norton Harry K. 
Norton Mrs Ned C 
Norwood A Anderson' 

(C) 
Noss Fred P 



O'Brien Eugene 

O'Hara J J 

Old Florence 

ore! rl dm •'stead "P*rey 

Oldfleld J C (C) 

Onetta 

Onrl Archie 

Orton Mlron 



Paget Lois (C) 
Palmar Gaston 



Parker Gladys 
Patton Helen (C) 
Payne Tom M (C) 
Paulette Louise 
Paul Jeanetto 
Peerless Pendletons 

(C) 
Pehlman Peggy (C) 
Pel ham 

Phillips Mr A Mrs C 
Plquo Harry 
Plowden Miss D 
Polk Jack (C) 
Poner Fred 
Porter Edward D 
Powers Richard (P) 
Prince A Ddferie 



Raffln Mrs 
Ramsey Emma 
Ramsey Miss M 
Ramsey A Kline (C) 
Randall Russell 
Rasmussen Chas (SF) 
Raver Harry 
Raymond Gert (C) 
Raymond Henry (P) 
Raymone (C) 
Ray A Ray 
Redding Edwin 
Reese A Dasse 
Rebn Marva 
-H'tfQ"0ueB:' .■"."..'■ 
Reynolds Harrington 
Rial Fred 
Richards C (C) 
Richards Mrs S H 
Riley Larry A Co 
Robertson Harry (C) 
Robertson Hslen 
Roberts A Hill 



Robinson Mrs Cl'r'ce 
Rooney J (C) 
Ross Vera (P) 
Rulston T B 
Kunoe Horace 
Russell A Held 
Ryan Anita K 
Rydell Helen 

S 
Santell Rudolph (C) 
Saw telle Erma 
Schuster Milton (C) 
Seymour Grace 
Seymour O E (P) 
Sharp Geo B (C) 
Shea Evelyn 
Shields Mr A Mrs F 
Sherman Mr A Mrs D 
Sbrlner Joe 
Simon Louis 
Sinclair Mrs Franklin 
Sinclair Horace 
Smith Eddie 
Smith Frank (P) 
Smith Jeanette L 
Snell Vern 
Specks Two 
Spellman Jeanette 
Spirting Harry (P) 
Sports of the Alps 
Stafford J M (SF) 
Standard Mr P 

Stanton Will S 
Starr Mrs M 
Startup Harry 
St Clair Grace 
Sterling A Love (C) 
Stevens Mrs Leo 
Stevens Morton 
Stewart Joan 



VARIETY 



— ♦* 



= 



■ . u ■«< 



37 




■ 
■ 






38 



VARIETY 



=s? 



HERE 

YOU 
ARE 

BOYS 

(and Girls) 





The newest, brand newest, musical novelty song hit of the moment, is 



I 






I 



This is the song that set things a sizzling through the West and is just starting to "rip things up" in 

New York. 

COPIES NOW IN PRINT GET IN EARLY ! 



BOSTON 

I I TRE MO NT ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD cndCMERRY STS 



Stone Geo 
Btoner Jessie 
Stover B W 
Stuart Marie B 
Stuart Reggie (€) 
Suuman Sol 
Swart* Betty 
Sylvester Larry 



Tendehoa Chief 
Terry Arthur 4- 
Thatcher Charlie 
Thome Harry 
{Tint Al ( C) 
Tltcomb La Belle 
Tlvolera (C) 
Tobln Jerome (C) 
Toney Tommy 
Toeaee Louis 
Tracy Ray 
Train Seal 
Trevor Norman 
Trueedale Howard B 
Tucker Jack 
Turner Anna (C) 
Turner Chaa B 
Turner Wllla (G) 
Turple Violet (C) 
Tyler Hasel 



Van Auatln « Park 
Van Frank (P) 
Vaughn Arthur (C) 
Vaughn Out (Reg) 
Velnoe John 
Vert Hasel 

W 
Wallace Vesta 
Walmer Carl (C) 



Walters Elmer 
Walters Selma 
Ward ft Wilson 
Ward Florence 
Ward Solly 
Watson W O 
Watts D F 
Way oral M (C) 
Weber Bud 
Weber J 
Welly Max 
Wells Corlnne (C) 
West Edward 
West Bam 
Weston Mary (C) 
Whalte J A (C) i 

Wlggens Bert (C) ' 
Wilbur Miss Bunny 
Wilkinson Geo 
Wilkes Rath 
Wilson Daisy (8F) 
Wilson Jack 
Wilson Peggy 
Wolferdon Mrs H 
Wolgas ft Girlie (0) 
Wood Mr ft Mrs Albt 
Woods Thos B 
Worth Madlyn (P) 



T 
Tettan Eurla 
Young Beulah 
Toung Dorothy 
Toung A Win 
Yyette 
i 

Z 
Zayarroe Ameta 
Zell ft Walrod 
Zlra Lillian 
Zora Gara (C) 
Zuro Joelah 



i" 



(O 



The 
Tailor 



Mack, 

1582-1584 BROADWAY 

Opp. Strand Theatre 

722-724-726 SEVENTH AVE. 

Op*. Columbia Theatre' 

HABERDASHERIE SHOP 
~ 7iS SEVENTrt AVE. 

Few Doors Above Columbia 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 



LEO FEISTjhc. 

135 W. 44<hS*., NEW YORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE B'L'D'G. 




CHICAGO 

VARIETY'S CHICAGO OFFICE, Majestic Theatre Bldg. 



The Majestlo unfurled three largo American 
flags to the sero breesee Monday. 



Janet Beecher left "Fair and 
Saturday, replaced by Helen 0111. 



Wanner" 



Charles Kohl left last Thursday for Baa 



Howard Langford was In Chicago last week 
en route to Racine, where he appeared with 
the "Katlnka" road company. 

The Lott Brothers, who operate the Bt 
Regis, have disposed of their Interests In the 
Raleigh Hotel on the north side. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unleae otherwise) noted, the following reports ere for the current week. 



Diego. Csl.. to spend s part of the winter 
with his family. 



The Alcasar Amusement Co. last week 
brought attachment proceedings against George 
B. Brown. 



l~*v '/r ports *b\fw \b*t TelaS'lS hungry' for 
"girl shows." The "WoTld of Pleasure" on 
Its Texas tour Is away ahead on the returns. 

The cold weather hae celled off the proposed 
tut in prices by several local vaudeville 
houses. 



Ben Lewis, treasurer of the American, who 
had his tonsils and adenoids removed, la back 
on duty. 

Harry Weber has sold out his Interest In the 
Coney Holmes office to Edgar Dudley. The 
flrr?,lf) to. h*- known as Holmes ft- Dtillcji. 



Manager Jamee E. Harris Is playing Inde- 
pendent TandeyUle shows at the Regent, Prai- 
rie du Chlen, Wis. 

There's s scarlet fever epidemic si Oarlls- 



ST. LOUIS 

7" th and OLIVE. ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PANTAGES THEATRE Bld« 



ville, 111. Traveling combination* are passing 
up the town at present. 

Prank Grace (Berkes and Grace) has racer- 




FIFTH AVENUE IMPORTER 
and DESIGNER 

Luxurious Gowns of 
Fashion and Quality 

Gowns, Suits, and 
Wraps have arrived 
in a magnificent col- 
lection, each reveal- 
ing a splendor of 
color and a wealth 
of style never before 
surpassed and rarely 
equalled, at uncom- 
monly low prices. 

Specialising to tee Theatrical 
Profession. Discount Allowed 

130 West 45th Street ' 
New York City 

Phone Bryant 801 



VARIETY 



» 



I. MILLER, ISM Broadway, B ^£tT i 

lea 4 wart- ^g«A auras* fswMMS 

4*"«- A ^^k\ sV Maaufectarer of 




Theatrical Boot* 

CL0C7?»lttt 
ft ■ d Aevobetic 

ft*™ wuji B 

canity. All work 
mad* ait abort 



AUGUSTOS 
IORIO ft SON 

anuiacturare of the 



the World. 



Keys 

t» Grand Strew* 

NEW YORK CITY 



Bon Marche 



GLOVES 

■ILK UNDERWEAR 



POLLY HYMAN 




PLUSH DROPS Ansu^od 

Special Diecoaata .aid Tirm Thle 

Rental la City » 

CONSOLIDATED VELVET 
241 Weat «th St. Now Yes* 



SCENERY HELPS YOUR ACT 

Builder* ftftft ailitm of sredeetlese ft«d vasdevtlle 
aets. Trees eseaery a aeeclaJty. See sae. I eaa save 

^fntoVnictiotmc studio, «s w. «. st 

Broadway OSaee. SaJety Theatre BellSlae. Beam 4S* 



^ HESS 



H IGH r.WADE 






What Shall I Do 
With That Spot? 






CLEANSER AND DYER 

Gowns cleans*! or dyed la 14 hoars. 
deTH STRFFT AND BROADWAY 



A cleaning i«M far 

ataiat of any aatwre oa 
wraps, g loves, alippcrt aftd rtb- 
eons aaajr bo had at this eetab 
lishaneet in thrat 
aaad at ■oat b o lth n 

TaL Bryant 



Washington Detective Bureau, '•«• 

LJaamaai aad Beads al 

Detective Work In All Its Branches 



Job* T. Vlchwry, President 

OFFICE OPEN ALL NIGHT 



Secretary 



General Office: 1441 to 1449 Broadway, low York City 



CHICAGO Office: 
Webster Bui Wing 



ant 1142-1141 

NIAGARA FALLS Office: 
Glaefc 



TTT 



l>MtfhThlley Railroad 

1IM Taroaata. tltJi 



Afl Steal Cara. 



• 



If 

A 



E. F. A. 



Bryant «tli. 
J. SIMMONS. A a F. A. 



^ EMMA CARUS 

eooooragad by Larry Comer, la acknowledged to 
ba doing the beat vaudeville act of her career. 
Her talkina material was written by JAMES M A 01- 
80N. UN Broadway. New York. 




GuarriniCo. 




'XSBOt 



HIPPODROME 

THE BIG SHOW" » 



WAWTCn- MUSICAL COMEDY TABLOID 

ffiiillCI/* PEOPLE FOR ALL LINES 

COMEDIANS who can produce with acripta. CHORUS GIRLS who cam eing. daaco aad 
load numbera. SISTER TEAMS aad SPECIALTY PEOPLE preferred. Sand photos, which 
wo will return. State all la first latter, with lowest aaJary. Saaaon'a work. 

Addresa, AL. BECKERICH, Manager, Lyric Theatre, Jaaneetown, N. Y. 



(herself) KELLtRIVIANN 

la a aow WATER SPECTACLE 



MJ ^Vli y 2^ t ^^^ u lJ i H i^!i^^ 



- 



Arthur Deagon was again compelled to lay 
off last week because of throat trouble, with 
which he has been affected on and off all sea- 
son. He left a Philadelphia hospital where ho 
was confined with on attack of pneumonia last 
fall before he hod recuperated. 



ered from a recent Injury to his leg, and It 
doing his usual hoofing with the Al. Jolaon 
show. 



Fred LeComte has signed to manage "Hans 
A Frkz." Which opened a tour of one nlghters 
at Michigan City Sunday. A second c om pa n y 
is also being farmed. 

"The Lioness" (Margaret Anglln) opens at 
the Blackstone next Monday, replacing "The 
Arms and the Girl" (Cyril Scott), which 
failed to keep up in business. 

The premiere of Robert Sherman's new 
play, "The Never Born." will take place Feb. 
10 at Kankakee. Fred Gordon will manage 
and the man ahead is E. C. Rockwell. 

The recent offer of corporate Interests to 
the city oouncll to spend $185,000,000 for the 
building of subways, has been given much 
Importance, 

Da-rid Idssl Is new assistant treasurer st tae 
Garrick to Danny Cotter, the latter, by the 
way, being considered one of the best ticket 
sellers west of the Hudson. 

Harvey Arlington, from the Orpheum, Grand 
Rapids, goes to Battle Creek Feb. 18 to man- 
age the W. 8. Butterfleld house, B. J. Lati- 
more 1 earing st th at time . 

Claude Ooldlng left Monday via the 20th 
Century for New* York, where he will loin his 
wife, Clara Ksstlng, **© »■ ■•*" *•■»*» 
"single." Owing to the condition of folding's 
voice, the "double sot" will be shelved for the 
present. 



MME. RIALTA'S 

FACE REJUVENATOR 



Of ft 



Chicago agents hays received some of the 
"links" to the "fifty letter chain" sent out of 
New York to aid Christine Rohllng, known 
professionally as May Wentworth, who was 
severly Injured while trying to escape from 
a burning rooming house in New York Dec. 
last 



iwfoletioalssd the art 
abasias aad 




WflUPK 



the fast 

Use* by Balls ■ 

■asrtta Snow. Ytaset Bala 

Carrie Reyaelee. Truly Baat- 

vjr task aad Matte Balden, aad 

^~jT fssstea. Pitas, tl at s arYar. 

eraVva »• Bryant sm. . ... PaMany Pras la 
Braatar Raw Tork. 

MME. MALTA MFG. CO, lac 

Rialta, Safer e% Wahh 
W Wast 4ttk St, New Yarfc 



Theater builders are oenterlng all their at- 
tention apparently on the north side, and not 
only are Jones-Llnlck A Behaefer and the 
Cuneo-Lecalal Interests planning to hare 
houses operating there, but report has It a 
new pop houae may be built around Wilson 
avenue and Clark street. Several new plo- 
ture theatres are sure to ooma, with one now 
in course Sf construction. 

A peculiar situation exists because of a re- 
cent Pantages order regarding bis newly-ao- 
qulrbd house In Minneapolis, where the circuit 
now starts. The order prohibits any act from 
first playing St. Paul and then crossing to 
Minneapolis to begin the tour of his houses. 
In other words, all acts with Psntages con- 
tracts must go to Minneapolis direct. St. 
Paul Is booked by tbe W. Y. M. A and previ- 
ously theatres In the two cities were not con- 
sidered opposition* 

MAJESTIC (Fred Eberts, mgr.; agent, Or- 
pheum). — A short but well rounded bill this 
week, with the final act over at 10.06 Monday 
night. Then came the fourth episode oi 
"Patrla," which brought tbe exit march at 
10.30. Edwin George did not sppear until 
Tuesday, and Vol and Galland (formerly known 
aa Gamble), who Is a mathematical marvel, 
doubled with the Palace, taking the closing 
spot at the Majestic. Mme. Jesnne Jomelli 
scored the hit of the show. Mme. Jomelli was 
once of the Metropolitan Opera and Is a favor- 
ite on the coast, as she apparently Is here. 
Accompanied by the composer, Hallett O li- 
berie, she displayed a remarkably smooth 
soprano voice, rendering four selections 
which the house, quite a bit off In sttendsnos 
probably because of a general reaction from 
last week, thoroughly appreciated. In the van 
for applause getting were Brooks and Bowen. 
the colored team who handle their ditties and 



comedy in subdued style. Dlgby Bell aad Co. 
in "Mind Tour Own Business 77 headlined. The 
action has been speeded up and while there Is 
nothing uproarious In the way of comedy, the 
playlet was made quite amusing. One of the 
brightest spots of the bill was furnished by 
Clara Howard, the layout of the show forc- 
ing her into tbe No. 2 position. Miss Howard 
did not start auspiciously but she had the 
house with her after half way through. Hsr 
Chaplin stunts Hash a vivid suggestion of the 
film star. Lew Brtos and Helena Coyne with 
their dancing, enhanced by production efforts, 
furnished a pleasing diversion. Dainty Marie 
was sure fire In tbe third spot. The Alaska 
Trio in an Interesting show of how Ice skat- 
ing can be done on a special floor prepara- 
tion that Isn't ice, opened the bill nicely. 
Gallant, with a well working stralgb* man. 
quickly and brightly performed his mental 
acrobatics with figures, with enough comedy 
to keen It from being a dry exhibition. He 
easily held down the early dosing spot. 

PALACE (Roes Behne, mgr.; agent Or- 
pheum). — The Palace bill Monday was top- 
heavy with singing. So thoroughly steeped 
and saturated was the show with songs that 
only the Individual ability aad personality 
of some of the turns kept the Interest shove 
par. The bill was Just one song after an- 
other, but notwithstanding the audience 
/showed unusual approval or the show as a 
whols. The bill was not arranged in the 
best shape imaginable to bring out its vaude- 
ville strength and speed. Harry Singer was 
missed around the lobby, as H. 8. was always 
on the Job, rain or shine. Behne Is doing 
his best to run both the house and ticket 
office and considering drawbacks Monday did 
well for hla second week's start. Ross is 
mighty popular with the folks around the 
Clark and Randolph streets Rlalto, and they 
are all pulling for him to "make good" at 
the Palace. Foley and O'Nell opened the 
show. No business at all in this spot, but 
to -how what determination, grit and stick - 
to-it-iveness will do for a couple of young 
chsps, they copped the biggest kind of a hit 
In the "No. 1" position. Of course one can 
make "allowances" for "friends," but Just 
the same they bagged a corking big hit and 
did better with the opening spot than the 
majority of turns have done in the same 
position in more than a year. They rely 
mostly on songs and every number was well 
received. The Four HoIIowaya were "No. 2." 
Just why they didn't open the show is a 
mystery. The HoIIowaya have a splendid tight 
wire turn and their routine includes some 




^.sr 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS $5.00 

Km seen weed. A 
aad Fibre 



lis 



ML A few 



. SI W. Slat St. New York 



22. 



Dr. JULIAN SIEGEL *™Jl?£Z n ?r£2Z' AY 

DENTIST 



Mklal Dtattet to <h* Wktt* B*u 




. MURPHY 



(ADAM SOWERGUY) 

EDITOR OF 

•THE SLAPSTICK" 



In the Market to furnish 
Vaudeville Material 



Freak Mil tee. 
IK 



Msrssrt Lloyd, 



far Al Jetsse, Bay Cex. 

aa. eteedard aad Nyaea, 

■sAesy aad Breaks aad 



TABIBTT. Raw Tork. 



ansa 



"flashy" tricks. The boy handling the com- 
edy Is a splendid ground tumbler. Yal and 
Gamble, billed as the "human comptometer," 
la a lightning calculator of the late Griffith 
type, and If his Impression at the Palace is 
any criterion, Gamble is in vaudeville to 
stay. He put over bis mathematical solu- 
tions with amatlng rapidky aad the returns 
were never In doubt. Dorothy Shoemaker 
and Co. oflered "Supper For Two." Theme not 
new by any means, yet the stage setting was 
new end fetching. An odd setting, to be 
sure, but one that is a big asset to tbe set 
giving It the "Belasco appearance." Miss 
Shoemaker and her dramatic assistants teach 
quite % moral with the playlet Miss Shoe- 
maker displays a hsndsome wardrobe and 
enacts her role creditably. Louis Leon Hall 
as her husband was bully. (This same Hall 
has quite a stock rep down East.) Edwin 
Brandt has an excellent speaking voice and 
made every line tell. Of course, it's a sketch 
whero a "surprise finish" helps sustain its 
dramatic tension. Act pleased the Palace 
regulars. Paul Morton and Naomi Glaaa ware 
an unquestioned hit. Other teams can learn 
a lesson by watching these clever entertainers 
work. Medlin. Watta and Townee may have 
knocked 'em out of their seats on the road, 
but it'a doubtful if their act was ever as well 
received at it was at the Palace Monday. 
Surefire, with the fat fellow copping the lion's 
share of honors. The trio had lta patter writ- 
ten especially for them by Herbert Moore, 
who ia fast gaining fame as a vaudeville 
writer. That fat boy demonstrated that any 
time the others quit him cold that he oan 
sally right out and get plenty of time doing 
a "single." Wellington Cross and Lois Jo- 
sephine paid no attention to tbe avalanche of 
aongs ahead, but pitched right Into their stage 
w\T7k tflWHv<!-y.- rVwTra Vff.vuifW; fc«>r*jf> j/"?** V'M- 1 "" 
let Shout a trip to the auto' show last Sat- 
urday night that pleased immensely. Ernest 
R. Ball had a very hard time getting started, 
aa the aong doluge ahead mitigated. When 
he struck a medley of his old compositions 
the result must have made him feel mighty 
good personally. To keep abreast of the 
times Ball Introduced a new song that stirred 
up patriotism. The Six Wster Llllles haven't 



4# 



VARIETY 






B. F. Keith's 

Circuit 

UnitedBooking 

Offices 

(Agency) 

A. PAUL KEITH, Preside* 

E. F. ALBBE, Vice-President and General MtntfM 






FOR BOOKING ADBRESS 

S. K. HODGDON 



Palace Theatre Sisfrftsg 



New York City 



Feiber & Shea 



1493 Broadway 

(Putnam Building) 

New York City 



changed to any extent since leaving Now 
▼•rk. Mark, 

RIALTO (Harry Earl, mgr.; agent, Doyle- 
Loew).— Anybody who thought the new Rlalto's 
capacity business for the part fortnight was 
a flash In the pan will be surprised to hear 
the amazing business Is keeping up. In the 
faoe of sero weather, the Rlalto, without a 
big lobby front to accommodate the waiting 
crowds, has been hitting the high attendance 
speed since the opening. Harry Earl, man- 
ager, who was HI the opening week, was on 
Che Job Monday and he was kept on the jump. 
The bill fairly groaned under Its weight of 
dancing, and one act after another was there 
with some sort of stepping. The Five Mc- 
Larens opened proceedings and did nicely, al- 
though the audience was just straggling In. 
Tom Brentford, a familiar figure In the Chi- 
cago houses, had easy sailing with his imi- 
tations. His "German band bit" was well 
received. "Vice Oraft" comes at a time when 
the Chief of Chicago's police is under indict- 
ment for alleged Implications with Kraft and 
-vlfcv rfng&, tncl tl.-o i-w,vr-j*--ii.»- f.'^l.tc, u<n 
State* Attdrhey Hdyhe's sensational round- 
up of "men higher up" In the police depart- 
ment. It tells In plain English how a police 
captain attempts to graft with a bawdy 
house keeper right In the very portals of the 
police department and endeavors to use his 
influence to send a pretty scrub-girl to a 



life of 111 fame. The cap's scheme Is nipped 
when a suposed "inside man" saves the girl 
and gives the police head a physical lam- 
basting. The acting Is of secondary con- 
sideration. Just as long as the "grafting 
captain" and the siren-voiced keeper of the 
scarlet house were being outguessed and out- 
witted the audience didn't mind what kind 
of players were enacting the roles. There 
were strong words and a "hell" at the close, 
so every body seemed satisfied. The Con- 
nelly Sisters pleased with songs and dances. 
After the Hearst-Pathe Weekly, Ward and 
Raymond appeared and bagged the comedy 
lilt of the first show. This pair, through 
Ward's Dutchy accent and mannerisms, were 
a laughing hit all the way. Their dancing 
was favorably received. Following their 
hardHhoe stepping finish appeared the Six 
Stylish Steppers. They made a dandy lm- 
preHsion. "The Polar Girls" made a flash 
with its scenery, chorus, principals and cos- 
tumes. Not much to the offering, but the girls 
were Riven ample opportunity to display some 
a'.i.'n.' 1 ? }** !o.A;:j<$t bi.?gtf"\/So.\'5T""~Tii«rrf' vtas'A 
new girl in the half dozen who came within 
an aco of throwing the others out of step 
several times. Act was rather cramped for 
Htagc space, but looked like a lot of money 
Just the same, and the Rlaltoers were satis- 
fied. Following the Fox film comedy Bat- 
tling Nelson appeared In his characteristic 



Marcus Loew s 
Enterprises 



» • 



m i 






General Executive Offices 

Putnam Building Times Square 

New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 



General Booking Manager 






i 



Mr. Schenck Personally Interviews Artists Dally 

Between 11 and 1 

One*!* Office* Boatoo Offices 

North American Builcfin* Trenton! Theatre Bidding 

FRANK Q. DOYLE, in charge FRED MARDO, in charge 

Acts laying off in Southern territory 

wire this office 




INDEPENDENT 



VAUDEVILLE 



The Beet Sseall 

EXECUTIVE OFFI 



tn the Par West. 



first class acta. Comntunlcato 



fire 

by win at* letter. 



Work for Novelty Pi 
FRANCli 



BLD&. SAN 
seJHags el bo at s for AustralU *«r 



95 



X) **• - 



of all^artists goinf to Europe make their steamship arrangements 

iyei. 
Maurietta, Hawthorne and Burt. Four Harveys, Howell and Scott, Howard and 



Howard and Howard, Hanvar and Lee, Hallen and Haves, Hsssette and 



Harris. The Holdens, Huxter Bros., Heeley and Meeley, Howard Collinson 3, Hall and EarL 
The Hiattes, and Lillian Herlein. 

PAUL TAUBIG A SON, IM B, Mtn St* Nov YerkCJtv 

German Savings Bank Bid*. 



WANTED 



CAN PLACE A-l COMEDY TRIO or 
Quartette, for Thirty Weeks sett*. 
RIALTO BOOKING OFFICES. 140 
Broadway (Psoas, Bryant tTtl), Nov 



monologue, which was well received. Other 
acts to appear later In the day were Zelayas 
and Al. Fields and Co. Afar Iff. 

LINCOLN (Wm. McOowan, mgr.; agent, W. 
V. M. A.). — The advent of the last half week 
was accompanied by sub-zero weather which 
walloped the box office. Easily the most suc- 
cessful of the five sots was Al Fields with his 
two assisting players in "The Vegetable Hunt- 
ers." Morris Golden caught on with comedy 
fiddling and singing, the eccentric dance ma- 
terially helping. "Song and Dance Revue" is 
unususl, since then are no male characters, 
the roster holding three girl principals and a 
chorus of six. The producers have splurged 
a bit on costumes and display a number of 
scene changes, the efTort apparently being 
made to make up in color what is lacking In 
comedy. Fitzgerald and Lorenz's turn con- 
sists mostly of mimicry, that done by the man 
who loses the Illusion of bis irritations by an- 
nouncing the effect after doing it. The team 
was replaced after the first day by Strong and 
Douglas. Jose and Ray opened the bill with 
a crude pantomime, amusing In spots. 

*;<T€R1CAN \E. L. G©Uib*Vf„ ingi. , ageulr 
W. V. M. A.). — Arctic temperature affected 
business here the latter part of last week, as 
with most of the outlying houses. The last 
half show was a good one, topped by James 
Cullen, who sported his extravagant frock 
coat, his Miller's jokes and ditties to the de- 
light of the audience. Jim didn't start off 



with a bouquet, but as soon as he opened the 
joke book it was easy picking. Lona's Hawal- 
lans supplied a strong erasing act. It Is made 
up of five men who sing and play the popular 
Hawaiian numbers rather well. Lona comes 
on at the finish with a dance a la Honolulu, 
which added little to the turn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mel-Burne fitted in well In a comedy playlet. 
Fields, Keane and Ward, singing and comedy 
trio, delivered strongly. Ward, Boll and Ward, 
two unusually fast acrobats and a woman 
dancer, opened the show very cleverly. Atten- 
tion to their dressing might help them. 

VICTORIA (Harry Blaundln, mgr.; agent 
Frank Q. Doyle). — Considering the weather 
the business last week for the last halt was 
good. Dixie Harris snd Four In fifth spot 
(next to closing) displayed the olass of the 
show, the neat dressing of the men and Miss 
Harris' taste In gowns materially helping. 
The men have good harmony at times but 
for some reason their work has not rewarded 
as It should have done. Electrical Venus 
shared honors with the Harris turn, a bushy- 
haired plant lending plenty of comedy. Paul 
•*nu ••F-atittnv; * ho opened Ifcti' ahow apltiMV.y 
with a ring act. have done tie exceptional bf 
mounting their turn with special hangings of a 
gold and purple striped material, and It may 
bo noted that the extra effort and expense Is 
well worth while. Lulu 8utton snd Co., In a 
comedy sketch of fair merit, were on fourth. 
Alice Allison held down number throe with 



VARIETY 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 

■ 

WILLIAM FOX, President 

nmeattVa Officaa, 1M Wast 4Cth St, New York 



s 



JACK W. LOEB 



EDGAR ALLEN 









baterrlewe wMk artiste 



••«. or by 



AMALGAMATED 

VaIIEVILLE AGENCY 



President 






General Executive Offices i 
729 7th AVE. AT FORTY-NINTH ST. 






M. D. SIMMONS 

General Booking Manager 

ARTISTS can secure long engagements by booking direct with us 



The Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association 

MORT SINGER, General Manager 

Majestic Theatre Building, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Harry Rickard's Tivoli Theatres 



LT». 
AUSraALIA 



Aad AFFILIATED CIRCUIT!, INRIA and AFRICA 
Combined Capital, |3,«0,«0 



Combined Capital, *J,«SU,W» 

HUGH McINTOSH, Governing Director 

Registered Cable Address: "HUGRMAC," Sydney 

Head Office, TIVOU TRRATRK, SYRNIY, AURTIALIA 

NEW YORK OFFICES: 311 Strand Theatre Ride 

VAUMV1LLE ACTS 



ACADEMY 

RUFFALO 

MCiA!.VLACISW/5MtD. 
•'•>• oi; will 



her banjo playing, of which there was Just a 
bit too much. Knight and Carlyle were sched- 
uled for number two, but when Otis Knight 
was taken down with ptomaine poisoning at 
rehearsal. Miss Carlyle occupied the spot 
alone with several solos. Knight recovered 
and joined the show on Friday. 

WINDSOR (D. L. Swarts, mgr. ; agent, W. 
V. M. A.). — With the thermometer ten below 
and a biting wind business at the Windsor 
for the second show last Friday night did 
not bring any smiles to Manager Swarta's 
face. Several hundred braved the elements 
anyway. The bill gave splendid satisfac- 
tion. It got started late, but went through 
nicely. tEmmett's canines opened. Pleasing 
act but could be rearranged for better results. 
That announcement Idea with the dog slows 
the act up noticeably. Emmett should 
have worn a coat. Miriam Mahr comes 
from the Pacific Coast. Billed as a "cyclone 
of ragtime," ahe offered numbers that hinged 
mostly on coon shouting. Miss Mahr Isn't a bad 
entertainer, although someone has made her 
believe she is a dancer. Her stepping should 
go out on the revision and several new num- 
bers obtained. Miss Mahr could pay more at- 
tention to her dressing — not that she may not 
have a world of wardrobe, but her outfit last 
Friday didn't look as attractive as she might. 
Her arms could also stand more powder or 
"whitening." She was liked. Jane Con- 
nelly and Co. were well received In a quiet 
little skit, "A Strong Cup of Tea." Miss Con- 
nelly Is an attractive miss, has personality 
and arts sweetly and effectively. Act specially 
staged. Browning and Dean hit a comedy 
vein that was advantageously placed. These 
boys make every point tell. Crossman's En- 
':VtiffW*-"h«l ortty J'licd' (ne'KthgV itr'nutnVn' 
but made their music score all the way. 

WILSON (V. H. Buhl, mgr.; agent. W. V. 
M. A.). — The Clown Seal opened the last half 
last week and held attention. Charles Olbbs. 
dressed more conventionally now, did well 
with Imitations, all things considered and a 
lack of a full house on the cold night was 
oae of them. Keno and Oreen have improved 




their act. On stepping this pair sails along 
nicely and they have a new closing number — 
a la Hawaiian — that gives them opportunity. 
Eddie Borden, assisted by James A. Dwyer, 
who also essays comedy (a fidgety English- 
man) uses every ounce of energy— calls Into 
play all of his old stage "bits," Including sev- 
eral Imitations that are not needed, and 
closed strong with bis acrobatlo dance. Very 
well received. Princess Kalama closed the 
show. The Princess not only Is a good-look- 
ing Hawaiian but sings and dances well. She 
carries an effective stage setting, and that Is a 
big help. But most of all to be considered Is 
a big fellow — William Kao— singer and In- 
strumentalist. He's there a mile with the 
steel guitar and ukelele. The "hula hula" 
dance proved a strong closer. 

ACADEMY (Joseph Pilgrim, mgr.; agent, 
W. V. M. A.). — The Academy the last half of 
last week had capacity for the week end. The 
Great Rago tried to outdo Houdlnl on a box 
escape trick. Rago evidently made them like 
it. McCarthy's Minstrels, seven people- -who 
found the Academy ltes In a receptive mood — 
scored substantially. The Kelloggs offered a 
musical act that pleased, while the singing and 
dancing of Marshfleld and Riddle were ap- 
plauded. Sharp and Evans made a favorable 
impression. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

VARIETY'S 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

PANTAGE9!. THEATRE BLDC, 
Phone, Douglas's 22lt 



PRINCESS. — A pleasing small time show 
was at the Princess, the hou.se also showing 
an Increase In patronage, due to a nearby 
house closing. The Princess management In- 
creased the bill proper. Mlna Stralee opened 



FULLER'S VAUDEVILLE 

AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Managing Director, BEN J. FULLER 

New arranging bookings for following sailing, oat of Sen Fmnciscet 
"V.ntur«"-M«rch U "Sonoma"-April II M Lierra"-Juna f 

-Uarra-- April S "Van tur."-M«y ' 15 "3onom*"-Jun* 2* 

American Booking Manager, ROY D. MURPHY * 

BEN. J. FULLER'S CHICAGO BOOKING DEPT. 

WESTERN VAUREVILLE MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION, lltk FLOOR. CHICAGO, ILL. 




ANYTHING PERTAINING TO VAUDEVILLE 
NEW AND EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL 
LET'S BRUSH UP YOUR ACT 

J. P. MEDBURY, Material Writer GARFIELD KILGOUR. Lyric Writer 

ROEHM & RICHARDS CO. I 

21! Strati Ttoeira MMtof Broadway at 47th Street. Now York City 




with singing. Exceptional well-trained voice, 
but detracting from her good work through 
not possessing the appearance to properly put 
her numbers acroas. Light operatlo airs are 
mainly used, with a high range occasionally. 
She fared well enough considering the cir- 
cumstances. Sylvanls and Delphise followed 
with dancing, breaking the Idea through the 
man trying for comedy. If he Intends doing 
comedy, he has a pretty good start on him- 
self, through tbo makeup worn. While be 
tries for comedy with a couple of rube "gags" 
and character dances, in dress only be can 
claim himself to be a comedian. The woman 
has a dandy apearance, making three changes 
in all, and showing good taste in dress, other 
than the costume worn for the Spanish num- 
ber. The act could be cut The opening 
number Is "too long. Tho greater portion of 
the dancing (soft shoe) is not varied to any 
extent, naturally the overdose does not gain 
the appreciation that otherwise might be 
forthcoming. De Costa and De Costa are 
accordion players, with only rag numbers, 
other than one heavy piece, none played In 
catchy fashion. Either tbe Instruments are 
differently tuned or the boys know little of 
harmony. Ofttlmes many blue notes were 
struck. The rag playing Is ncthlng away 
from the ordinary. They give the Impression 
of Inexperience. Billy Cockran (blackface) 
sans; a couple of numbers, and told a couple 
of "ga*s" that were rather deep and pretty 
close to the danger line, gaining most of his 
returns through that. His final one especially 
hit the bull's eye for suggestlveness. Cockran 
has an idea of dress somewhat different from 
the average monologist, wearing tight trousers. 
It does not help his appearance. Tbe Deldas 
closed the show with their painting novelty. 
Thev were at the Hippodrome the previous 
week. 



was in Frisco oa his extended vacation, leav- 
ing to continue further south. 

Tbe Fillmore (pictures) la at present un- 
dergoing a change, the house being enlarged 
through securing a site In the rear, the build- 
ing to extend further baok and Increasing the 
seating capacity. 

Conway and Parks, at the Orpheum a few 
weeks ago. have dissolved. William Conway 
has Joined with Hector Goldsplnk. 

"♦Hit-the-Trall-Holllday" drew the biggest 
night buslneee the Columbia has had la three 
years. 



Those engaged for tbe Kelb and Dill "High 
Cost of Loving" are Ruth Will lama, Louise 
Francis. Dorothy Spencer, Eva Clark, Haael 
Randolf, Louise Chalfont. Veranda Gillette. 
Ben Slyck. 

Engagements for the Barbnnk, Lee Angeles, 
musical stock, are Hasel Regan, (So rg o 
Bpauldlng. Ben Dillon, Mabel Baker, Jaenes 
Sheehan, Florence Prlnty. 

, Bob Harmon la no longer' with Ethel White- 
side's "All Aboard" (girl act), on the Fan- 
tages Circuit 



The Blake & Amber agency has been busily 
engaging people for the Kolb and Dill show, 
to be striRod bv Charlie Alphln, and simed 
for the Burbank, Los Angeles. 



Through securing *xtra -mc/n^y from thtr 
Concerts funds to stage a large Xmas Con- 
cert In the Civic Auditorium, Supt. of Schools 
Boncoblerl lowered the funds to surh an ex- 
tent the supply is too meager for the music 
in the parks Sunday. Consequently no band 
concerts for the present are being given. 



Ed Milne, manager of Pantages, Seattle, 



Answering an advertisement In one of the 
dallies last week, 20 men called noon one F. 
O. Lewis, who Intended to organise a oom- 
pany, "Going the Pace," and deposited ft* as 
a registration foe. Then Lewis disappeared. 

Through Instructions received from New 
York headquarters, the local heads of the 
leading music publishers held a meeting last 
week to discuss and endeavor to do away with 
the professional copy abuse. It sppearn the 
general public here, through seme unknown 
source, continually secures professional eopies 
of the latest numbers published. It wen screed 
to form an association to proteet their own 
individual _lnt$r*»j*. .end PK*t , 'Vlff x>rca«<t«ieJ)y 
w:W Ik 1 . -b<'Ml to further- dtatfuab-sueh- matter* 
that may arise, and also tbe question of pay- 
ments to acts. The local managers are try- 
ing to arrange matters on a uniform basis. 
Each office will carry a sign calling attention 
to the professional copies formerly dlstrlbntsd 
freely. Professional credentials are now 
necessary to secure them. The payments will 
be regulated In such a way so all will work 



42 



VARIETY 



AMERICA'S FOREMOST CHARACTER ACTOR 



Mr. Louis 



- 







And a Supporting Company of Six of Exceeding Excellence 
In the Sensational Satirical Success of the Season 



« 



Some Warriors 



» 



By SAMUEL SHIPMAN and CLARA LIPMAN 

Authors of "Elevating a Husband," "Honor Thy Children," etc 
Presented Originally at the Friars' Frolic, Dec 17, 1916. 
Successfully Played at the Palace Theatre, New York, Jan. 8, 1917. 

Opens at the Majestic Theatre, Chicago, Next Week (Feb. 12) and 

Routed for the Entire Orpheum Circuit. 

Direction of LEWIS & GORDON 



\ 



on the eame bull, instead of the on* outbid- 
ding the other far a singer. The first meet- 
Ug was held In the Feist offices. Harvey 
Johnston of that office being present, besides 
▲1 Brown* (Wltmark). Phil Otis (Raralck) 
and Frank Snowden (Shapiro- Bernstein). 

BOSTON. 

By LBN LIBBBY. 

KBITH'S (Robert Q. Larsen, mgr.; agent, 
U. B. 0.).— Fair bill, with Blossom Seeley 
carrying headline honors easily due to the hit 
mads by her syncopated orchestra. Fay Tem- 
pleton was glTen feature advertising. Roy 
and Arthur, opened well ; Donald E. Roberts, 
fair; Hals and Peterson, excellent; Dyer and 
Pay, some new stuff, good ; Gallagher and 
Lewis, fair; Grace De Mar, snappy and 
aggressive single; "Patrla" closing. 

BOSTON (Charles Harris, mgr. ; agent, U. 
•B." O.). — Pop and pictures. Excellent and wsll 
advertised. _ 

BIJOU (Ralph Oilman, mgr.; agent, U. B. 
0.). — Pictures. Good. 

BOWDOIN (Al Bomerbee, mgy.; agent, 
•Loew). — Pop and pictures. Good business. 
White Rata strike affecting business but little. 

ST. JAMBS (Joseph Brennan, mgr.; agent, 
Loew). — Pop. Good. 

GLOBE) (Frank Meagher, mgr. ; agent, 
Loew). — Dally change of feature film program 
proving a hit May be permanent policy. 

ORPHBUM (V. J. Morris, mgr.; agent, 
Loew). — Pop. Excellent. 

SCOLLAY OLTMPIA (James J. McGuln- 
ness, mgr.). — Pop. Good business. House fea- 
tured In the papers as being one of the houses 
"pulled" by the White Rata. 

GORDON'S OLTMPIA (Frank Hookallo, 
mgr.). — Pop. Satisfactory business, this being 
the third house Involved In the W. R. U. 
strike. • 

PARK (Thomas Soriero, mgr.).— Pictures. 
Good. 

MAJESTIC (E. D. Smith, mgr.) .—Fourth 
week of "Daughter of the Gods." Excellent. 

SHUBERT (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— Last week 
of "Eileen" to good business. 

PLYMOUTH (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— Maude 
Fulton In "The Brat" opened to excellent 
bouse Monday. Comedy caught Instantly and 
should have excellent two weeks. Feb. 19 
brings the Faversham-Crossman production of 
"Getting Married." 

WILBUR (E. D. Smith, mgr.).— "The Blue 
Paradise" opened Monday night. Good house. 
In for a run. 

PARK SQUARE (Fred E. Wright, mgr.).— 
"Fair and Warmer" with Madge Kennedy 
opened Monday nl«ht strong. Should do the 

]fcj»x nusinees °f l ' 1 *' «<**«*"*>• 

COLONIAL (Charles' J. " Rl? h, 'mgr'.).'— 
Third week of "The Cohan Revue" to practical 
capacity. 

HOLLIS (Charles J. Rich, mgr.). — Last 
week of "Pierrot" to good business. Next 
week brings Julia Arthur in "Seremonda." 

TRBMONT (John B. Schoeffel, mgr.).— 




One of the successful 
added attractions with 

NORA 
BAYES CO 

7th week at the 
Eltinge Theatre 
New York City 




The world renowned 



CHARLES JOHNSON DEAN 

The originator of neat coon swelldom. 

New York "Sunday Telegraph," June 2, 1901: 
Johnson was one of the first to get away from the eccentric style of dressing, and 
his clothes are of as good material and as well fitted as were ever turned out by a Fifth 
Avenue tailor. 




"Springtime," going well on Its fifth week. 

BOSTON OPERA HOUSE (Lawrence Mc- 
Carty, mgr.). — Dark. 

CASTLE SQUARE (John Craig, mgr.).— 
"Jerry" (International) doing a fair week. 
"Mutt and Jeff's Wedding" underlined for 
next week. 

COPLEY (O. H. Pattee, mgr.).— Henry Jew- 
ett's English Players in "Milestones." Ideal 
production for this company, which made 
much of it "A Doll's House" next week. 

CASINO (Charles Waldron, mgr.).— "Step 
Lively Girls." Good. 

GAIETY (Charles Batcheller, mgr.).— 
"Ben Welch's Show." Big. 

HOWARD (George E. Lothrop, mgr.).— 
"Beauty, Youth and Folly" to capacity, with 
Wormwood's Monkey Circus heading the house 
bill. 

Frederic Hitchcock, giving his address as 
M5 111th street, New York City, and his 
business as a theatrical advertising agent, 
filed marriage intentions Monday to marry 
Helen E. Paine, a local professional. 



simultaneous with Blossom Seeley, receiving 
considerable publicity which helped her. 

Harmon Buahnell Craig, the elder son of 
John Craig, both of whom are sophomores, is 
planning to Join the American Ambulance 
Field Service In France shortly, sailing from 
New York on the 17th of this month If he can 
obtain the consent of his mother (Mary 
Young). 



P. DODD ACKERMAN 
SCENIC STUDIOS, Inc. 

140 W«t 3tth Stmt, 

New York Gty 

STAGE DECORATIONS 

CASINO THEATRE 
"YOU'RE IN LOVE" 

See oar Second Act scene "Her Soldier 
Boy," Aator Theatre. 

"THE MODERNISTIC STUDIO" 



Rube Marquard blew into town Monday 



BUFFALO. 

By W. B. 8TEPHAN. 

GARDEN (Wm. Graham, mgr.). — Leo 
Stevens and Lew Golden and "The Laugh- 
land Girls" doing commendably. 

GAYETY (Chas. Taylor, mgr.).— Sam Bid- 
man's Big Show going big. Next, "Hello 
New York." 

Mrc.lUJh'Vrt*' <i\mn. Lawmiti*," litii-ri i-^Rl-cn 
Lawrence in ''Broadway After Dark," well re- 
ceived here with the attendance slightly above 
normal. Next, "Pretty Baby." 

TECK (John Olsbel, mgr.). — Return engage- 
ment of "Very Good Eddie" heartily wel- 
comed with marked Jump in advanoe sale. 
Following, "Experience." 



I 

STAR (P. C. Cornell, mgr.).— Margaret 
Anglln in entirely new production, "The 
Lioness," opened here very successfully and 
commended by the local critics. Next. Flake 
O'Hara. 

SHEA'S (Henry Carr, mgr.). — Theodore 
Kosloff and Ballet, first honors ; Frank Shields, 
clever; Cole, Russell and Davis, hit; Minnie 
Allen, good ; Wilson and McNallya, well ap- 
plauded ; VIollnsky, pleasing; Kaufman Bros., 
do well ; Bradna and Merrick, close nicely. 

LYRIC (H. B. Franklin, mgr.).— "Neptune'a 
DJv.iy.btirV' '"??*?% favorably, with the Spar- 
ten Trio, Wiled -big. following ; Cloverteaf 
Three, very good ; Adair and Wyant, good ; 
Delmore and Moore, good ; Silvester, very 
clever; pictures to close. 

OLYMPIC (Bruoe Fowler, mgr.). — Six Gal- 
vlns featured and do well; Emllle Montrose, 
much applause ; Gertie DeMilt, olMt ; Do Cour- 



VARIETY 



43 



3BB 





RIGHT TIME 






IN 





NO FLAG! 



NO FIGHT! 



JUST LOYALTY AND MELODY 




ALL 






AMERICANS 




By IRVING BERLIN, EDGAR LESLIE aid GEO! MEYERS 

"LETS ALL BE AMERICANS NOW" 

Peace has always been our prayer, 
. Now there's trouble in the air, 
War is talked of everywhere, 
Still in God we trust; 
We're not looking for — any kind of war 
But if fight we must. 



<M « ■ - 



Chorus : 

It's up to you ! What will you do ? 
England or France may have your sympathy, 
Or Germany, but you'll agree 
That now is the time 
To fall in line, 

You swore that you would so be true to your vow, 
Let's all be Americans now. 



/ < I 4 1 



~ut\< »*.\»..<» 



Lincoln, Grant and Washington, 

They were peaceful men, each one, 

Still they took the sword and gun 

When real trouble came ; 

And I feel, somehow, they are wond'ring now 

If we'll do the same. 

(Copyright, Watenon, Barlin A Snydmr) 



WATERSON, BERLIN & SNYDER 

STRAND THEATRE BLDG., 47TH ST. AND BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CHICAGO * FRANK CLARK, Chicago Manager BOSTON 

81-83-85 Randolph St. MAX WINSLOW, New York Manager 220 Tremont Street 



VARIETY 



SPECIALLY ENGAGED 



> . >• . . 



--»■■**• e* M 



» *» * i .» >* 



■ . 1 * «V« | J. >*. » V ■ '» 



.,*,..» . ' 



. . - .• * » »»»-•■ f I 



■ 



. 








Cocoanut Grove, Century Theatre, New York 



Personal Representative 



MARRY J 



I 




sey Bros., good novelty; The Mlllards. do 
nicely. 

ACADEMY (Julee Micheal, mar.).— Flrat 
half headed by the Castellucla Band; Three 
Bllet Sisters, clever; Bell Hawallana, good; 
Dreno and Goodwin, a hit; Do Paron Trio, 
novel. Changed last half. 

The Buffalo Screen Club ball waa wall at* 
tend e d. 



Saaoha Platov and Vivian Leland are at the 
Old Teck and Charles Stuart and Dixie O'Nei! 
have been retained at the Maltoela Gardens. 



The annual ball of the Buffalo Theatrical 
Association will bo held at the Broadway 
Auditorium Feb. 14. 

BUI Sunday la drawing capacity houaea at 
•very performance, but there la do 
falling off at the local theatres. 



NOTICE FOR 
EUROPE 



aa VARIETY, aaw 

tago af tko Prepay Rate* 

the eesno. If at the thaw of 

rue* ta VARIETY. Now 
it la payment far It la 
ha VARIETY'S orealt at tko 



PALL HALL DEPOSIT AND FORWARD- 
ING CO. 

St, Ragomt k,S.W^ 



Far awiternritr fee 
Mall Caw wlD 

at 



tko Pan 
far VARIETY 



aft danger of 

VARIETY 

edges tko PaH MaJI Ce/a 



tko Pan Man ta VARIETY* 




4 BIG HITS OF A 5 -ACT BILL 





oeiiereeio wK 



ft 



MENLO MOORE Presents 

u r*94 TME V-wC 

With 
Oaorge Owodrsago, Dorothy Van, Jack Edwards, Mao Van, Jack OUWer, Maria Poflltt 



in 



You Remember Him— (RAY CONLIN) 



I 



R and 8HELTON 

In "The New Cook and the Entertainer 99 

the ~u 



"On. of the Boat Shows— If not tko Beet-en tko Circuit in Two Years."- Flint "Journal.* 



LOS ANGELES. 

Br GUY PRICK. 

Rehearaala are under way, under tko di- 
rection of Cbarlea Alphln, for tko now uoeleal 
production, "Hollo Hawaii." at the Borbank. 
Alphln wrote tko piece klmaalf. Mahal Baker, 
late of Australia, la to bo the prima donna, 
while Ben Dillon la to contribute the funny 
stuff. William Weightman, the millionaire 
auto racer, la backing tko venture. 



toallant 



Frank Lowry la M»4Mng tko publicity for 
the Burbank. 

The Mason gave a performance of "Rxparl- 
enee" Sunday night, breaking one of its Iron- 
clad ruloa in regard to keeping opaa on a 
Sabbath. 



The grand opera eeeeon te only two weeka 
off. The Auditorium will bonne the 
usual. 



Local vaudeville houaea report 
buslneaa. 



Donald Bowles, recently returned from the 
Antlpodea, la undecided whether to go into the 
movlee or return to tbe legit again. 

Bertha Mann opened at the Morocco aa lead- 
ing woman last week and made a favorable im- 
preaaion. Ramsey Morris also joined the 
Morocco foi 



Motion ploturea arc now In the Balance 

NEW ORLEANS 



Harold Melville and sister have gone to Ban 
Francisco to begin a tour of the Pantagee 
circuit. 



By O. M. 

TULANB (T. C. Campbell, mgr.).— Bltingo 
in "Cousin Lucy." 

CRESCENT (T. C. Campbell, mgr.).— 'Teg 
o' My Heart." 

LAFAYBTTfl (Harry B. Loeb, mgr.). — Boa- 
ton Oread Opera Co. 

LYRIC (Lew Rose, mgr.)' — Stock burleaque. 

ALAMO (Will Ouarlnger, mgr.).— Jimmle 
Brown'a Revue. 



Tommy O'Neill and Belle Coatello rejoined 



THEeCDTEl^ 

Womea's Smart Feetwear * 



For Street, Stage and Evening Wear 

1560 Broadway IG^tZSZ 

afafl Orders Promptly Filled 



the Lyric's burleequers Sunday. Mae Barle, 
with the same company, la ill with the grip. 

The Majestic, Jackson, Miss., la no more. 



Cyril Maude in "Orumpy" la the Tulane'e 
attraction next week. "When a olrl Loves" 
occupies the Crescent. Ethel Banks, probably 
a saving girl, la featured. Laat week the 
"Orumpy" company went through a wreck In 
South Carolina. No one waa hurt 



The Dream World la doing the largest busi- 
ness it has experienced in three yeara, with 
Chaplin in "Easy Street" aa an added at- 
traction, It'e one of the beat things Chaplin 
l\as done. 

FA. 



B. F. KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).— An- 
other bill, with an even balance, provided 
about three hours enjoyment for an audlenoe 
which filled the house almost to capacity 
Monday. Ruth St Denia had the headlino 




"THE PARIS FASHION SHOP" 



THE PARIS 

FASHION 

SHOP 

Tnte Weak (Feb. 5-6-7) 
Loew*e Asaerlcen, New York 

Feb. S-MO-Foa's Riviera, 

New York 



To vaudeville managers, artists, representatives and others, whom it may concern : 

This is to certify that I, Will Bradshaw, am the originator and author of the first and original 
draping act, known as "THE PARIS FASHION SHOP," and copyrighted by me as a A SHOP IN 

PARIS" AprJl 10, 1914 Entry Class D y XXC,-N<a 3606g. . Any-othe? so-called draping act .piaying"in' 

vaudeville is an infringement and copy act of my original work. Be it further known that Chas. W. 
Cross by agreement with me, is given full power to use the book of my copyrighted act. 






VARIETY 



45 



If pennants were presented for flie best bou^s bearing 1917 copyrights, any impartial 

*-— Jud^c would decide in favor of these fwo remarkable son^ls 

— - _ because AT SEVEN. SEVENTEEN AND SEVENTY'aHCJ 

— _ "OH johnny"posscss Ihatsomefhino 

that wins success 



AT 

SEVEN. SEVEHTEEK^ 

SBVENTy (Haddy Loved the Same Sw eet GjrU 

WKDSW RAYMOND &AK,- MUSIC BY ABE OU1AH " 



A NEW IDEA. ■ 

A phenomctul song* that we predict will be the firs! real SOtld 
hit for 19 7.. A wonderfully unique lyric lo which is wedded a simple uaturaf 
melody that lingers. It will fit any act, show or situation 

^ GET THIS NOW!!! 



Oh. johnny 
oh. johnny. oh 



m 

••• 



words w Ed. Rose- 
music oy Abe OiMAt{ 




We didn't waul lo publish 

"Oh. Johnny bid affci (WHITING ^DUKI) tried 
ou! this soh£ And wired thai it was the . £esl hit in v . 
simply had to rush our printer i : 

Orcal for Single: Doubles, C^uar!c!!e tid Ensembles. Catch lines galore. 



FOPQTFP MllQFf P11RTTQHFP FWr ak olman »i marviw lee in charge Prof Dept. 

I VUO 1 LI\ i kHOIV r LiJL/JLiiJ>llJLJrV lilv. COHAN . ,,a hoi 

New York Headquarters Hotel Princeton, 116 W. 452 St. (Tom Payfon in charge ) 



FURS 

SAMPLES 

To Close Out 

Rosenberg Bros. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 
"THE R. B. FUR SYSTEM FURS'* 

13-15 W. 24th St. 
Tel. Frgt. 9692 

Special Discount to Professional* 



position. She was surrounded with a bill that 
just suits the regular devotee of vaudeville, 
with plenty of good laughing material and 
music liberally distributed throughout the en- 
tire show. The classical dancer Is offering al- 
most entirely new series of numbers for this 
visit, having Tea Shawn and the Denienawn 
dancers as her support. The program It ar- 
tistically arranged and while a bit stiff for 
vaudeville, carries class and color with It 
and was warmly appreciated. Just before Mrs. 
Vernon Castle appeared In the fourth episode 
of "Pstrla," the rural comedy. "Rubaville," 



put a corking good finish to the show. You 
are not long discovering this is a Rolfs pro- 
ductions, for the brass muslelaners get to work 
very quickly. There Is plenty of good comedy 
handled during the action to give the needed 
balance to the music and the singing goes over 
with a punch that was lacking in some of the 
other vocalising numbers. Ample license Is 
glvrn to the "rubes" in the country store 
scene to "cut-up scandalous-like," and they do 
It to advantage, though some of the comedy 
shows the result of long usage. The act was 
a big hit late In the afternoon. The mistake 



JESSIE 



JACK 



MORRIS -D BEASLEY 



In Vaudeville 



Direction, ALF T. WILTON 



HAROLD WOO LF 
HELEN STEWART 

"IN TWO FLATS" 

By HAROLD YYOOLF 

Right NOW-tlst Street 

Feb. lZ-Keith'a, 



DIRECTION, 

MAX HART 



Detroit 
Feb. 2f— Temple, 

Rochester 
March S-Shea'e, 

Buffalo 
March 12-Shea'a, 

Toronto 



Will Morrlsey makes In using material that 
has no place before an audience of the class 
that visits this house, prevents him being 
credited with being one of the big hits of the 
show. He was a big applause winner at that, 
for ho has some good stuff and knows how to 
make It get laughs, and Is ably supported by 
Freddie Clinton st the piano. As a matter of 
fact his clean stuff went over so well the 
other Is not needed. He should clean up his 



SAMAROFF 



AND 



MBS SOMA 



, • tr i ,•• 



THE RUSSIAN PEASANTS 
The Fastest, Cleverest and Most Original Act in 

Closing, the performance with the ORPHEUM ROAD SHOW and makiiag more than god 



(Have been complimented by all man- 
agers on the Tour for the way I treat my 
performing dogs. They show the good 
treatment upon the stage.) 



Representative, PAUL DURAND 



VARIETY 



AT THE PALACE THEATRE, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK (Feb. 5), DUPLICATING 

SUCCESS at the Majestic Theatre, Chicago, where "Variety" said: 



. 



. ■ • » *•< «» ■'*■ 









Harry Ellis did not seem feared a bit when he walked out to ting 
after such a prolonged session of aongs and talk ahead. Ellis is a 
tenor, and a corking good one, who, unlike some of the grand opera 
warblers that stick to the classics, offered a varied program that 
resulted in Ellis scoring one of the biggest hits of the entire show. 
The audience went nutty over his voice snd applauded for his return 
long after the lights had been flashed for the succeeding turn. (Dec &) 

AMERICA'S FAMOUS TENOR 



-■»■"■••"- 



; — . 



MY 







in his novelty songologue, "MY GHOSTLY VISITORS," by Herbert Moore 

Direction, ARTHUR KLEIN 



1 1917— The Season's First Sketch Success— 1917 1 


RYDER KEANE and ILKA DIEHL 


1 AND CO. m 1 


1 "HUMAN NATURE" 1 


1 A COMEDY ROMANCE by HAROLD A. CLARKE 1 


1 Stags Direction Management 1 


1 HENRY CHESTERFIELD HARRY WEBER 1 

1 1 



act at oaoo and he will bar* a tarn that will 
register a bit on any bill In any house. A 
clean, well written bit of comedy called "Cot- 
taw Stockings" placed a good sited hit to the 
credit of Mabelle Adams and Marion Murray, 
a couple of girls remembered from other offer- 
ings, la this latest combination of talent, 
which includes a classy musical Offering for 
the finish, the girls have a very pleaaing ve- 
hicle that was appreciated and liberally re- 
warded bora, as It should bo anywhere. A 
quartet of male singers calling themselves 
Those Four Entertainers did very well with 
their singing. The baas of the four trios for 
some comedy, and could got batter results If be 
did not try so bard. Aa It was bs slightly 
overdid the thing, but not enough to prevent 
the boys from finishing to a strong band. 
Paul MoCarty and Elsie Faye have an odd 
way of Introducing a singing and talking skit 
with a bit of dancing mixed in. They call It 
"Suicide Garden/' and there la Just enough 



plot to the sketch and a song to give a reason 
for the title. Their act la well handled, with 
some brisk crossfire chatter, and it brought the 
pair excellent results. Flavllla, a girl In 
white, who playa on a white accordion, held 
down the next to closing spot In a thoroughly 
likeable way. She plays well, for a girl, and 
has given some attention to selecting a pro- 
gram of numbers which pleases everybody. 
The Four Akla offered s very showy Japanese 
novelty act that got over strong In the open- 
ing position. They have a varied assortment 



f NERS 



AKE-UP 



Eat. IUNMV C. MINI M. Inc 



of bits, including a song by a little girl. The 
fourth episode of "Patrla" Is entitled "Double- 
Crossed," and from the four* episodes to date, 
this title would be a most appropriate one for 
the whole picture. It la still holding the 
house, however, despite that it comes on very 
late. 

NIXON (F. O. Nlxon-Nlrdlinger, mgr.).— 
Mile. Sumlko headlined. Others: Joyce, West 
and Senna, Sampson and Douglas, William 
DeHollis and Co. and others. The Fox film 
feature Is "One Touch of Sin.** 

COLONIAL (H. A. Smith, mgr.).— Rajah 
and his associates. Including Princess Olga and 
Prlncee Alia, furnished the headline attrac- 
tion. Others: "The Hoosler Girl," a musical 
tabloid, Amasa Brothers, Baby Helen, Mack 
and Handson In a skit called "Busted," Nip 
and Tuck. Big City Four and the five-reel 
picture. "The Primitive Call." 

NIXON'S GRAND OPERA HOUSE (W. D. 
Wegefarth, mgr.). — The musical tab called 



"Wanted, a Wife" la the headllaVr this week. 
Others : Koban Japa, Jack Marley, Lillian 
Fitzgerald, Savannah and Georgia, Kerlake's 
pigs and pictures. 

ALLEGHENY (Joseph Cohen, mgr.). — The 
film feature, "One Touch of Sin," with Gladys 
Rockwell featured. Is given the headline posi- 
tion, surrounded with the following vaude- 
ville acts: Josephine Cliff and Co. In "A 
Breath of Old Virginia," Tom Brown's Min- 
strels, Paahel and Cushlng, "Oh, Please Mr. 
Detective" and Jolly, Francea and Wild. 

BROADWAY (Joseph Cohen, mgr.). — The 
first showing of the Fox feature film, "The 
Scarlet Letter," with Mary Martin in the prin- 
cipal role, la announced here this week. The 
surrounding vaudeville bill contains Norman 
Jefferles' big girl act, "Maids of Phllly," Ber- 
nard and Harrlgan, Halley and Noble, Cole 
and Dennehey, Relgle and Bender. 

KEYSTONE (M. W. Taylor, mgr.).— Tom 
Linton, Grace Llnquist and Co., featured. 



THANKS TO 

Mr. JOSEPH SCHENCK 

We are playing our 

Fifth tour of the Loew Circuit 

Our aet U different from any other in the profession, fas that it 
combines hif h class, artistic dancing, comedy and a new idea in 
aerial gymnastics. 

The dressing is original and attractive. 

GIURAN and 

Car* VARIETY, N.w York 



.• .i 



SJ-+-- ■ i _«»._».-» *►>•>», 



VARIETY 



. p w > *-' M • V. ' ' 



' 



A TIP WORTH WHILE 






46 



Now Is the Time to Sing That Greatest of All 
Non-Hyphenated American Song 

DON'T BITE THE HAND 

THAT'S FEEDING YOU 

If you do not already know the song, and you cannot get to any of our offices, go 
to the nearest music store and buy a copy. It will pay you because you will prove 
to your audience that you are a live wire, public spirited, a 2 2 -karat loyal American 



99 



BOSTON 

181 TREMONT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD AND CHERRY STS. 



Paul Burns, Lillian Steele and Chums, Alice 
Nelson and Co., Town and Bride, Five Cantons 
and "From Sunshine to Shadows," of "The 
Great Secret" as the film feature. 

WILLIAM PENN (O. W. Metiel, mgr.).— 
Julian Rose features the first half hill. Others : 
Creighton and Belmont, Lillian Klngsley and 
Co. In "The Coward," Larry Reilly and Co. in 
"The Irish Emigrant." Bobby Heath and his 
Qirlles featured the second half of the week. 
Bessie Lore in "Nina; the Flower Girl," and 
"The Iced Bullet" were the film features. 

GLOBE (Sabloskey A McGurk).— "The 
Social Whirl," a musical comedy, with Jack 
Russell. Lotta Baker and Al Knight as prin- 
cipals headlined this week. Others: "An In- 
nocent Bystander." Matsattl Family, Mabel, 
Hobats and Hill, Mills and Moulton, Cole and 
Denahey, Nell McKlnley, Visions d'Art and 
others. 

CROSS KEYS (Sabloskey A McGurk).— Tal- 
bot's String Band, a local organisation which 
won the prise in the Mummer's Parade here 
on Now Year's Day made Its vaudeville debut 
the beadliner of this week's bill. Others : 
Plsano and Bingham, Hugh Blaney, Kelly and 
Mayo, Jack Morrlssey and Co., Gordon and 
Powers. Second half: Mona Hungerford and 
Co. In "My Daughter," featured. Others: 
Fen telle Stark Trio. Jane Weir In a sketch 
called 'The Cradle," Telegraph Trio, Fauer and 
Llnder, Eddie Trio and pictures. 



LEO FEIST, Inc. 

135 W. 44th St., NEW YORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE Bldg. 



SEATTLE. 
Br walblrt. 

METROPOLITAN — "The Lilac Domino," 24- 
28, drew good business. 

MOORE, TIVOLI, GRAND.— Dark. 

ORPHEUM.— Sixth week of musical com- 
edy by the Wilkes 1 layers ; splendid produc- 
tion of "The Yankee Prince." Now, "The 
Si^dtfc.-lft," with Norman Huckett, Phoebe 
Hunt and other dramatic player* In the cast. 

LYRIC. — Musical comedy and vaudeville. 

COLONIAL.-— Parson's Musical Comedy Co. 
and a feature photoplay. 

OAK. — Monte Carter Musical Comedy Com- 
pany in "The Seaside Flirts." 

ALHAMBRA.— (Orpheum).— Week 25. head- 
lining the bill is Seattle's own Japanese prima 
donna, Haruko Onuki, known locally as Marlon 
Ohnick and a graduate of the Queen Anne 
High school. Beatrice Hereford, Joint head- 
liner, clever character delineator. Riggs A 
Wltchie, terplschorean artists. Nordstrom A 
Plnkham, quaint comedy. Hans Hanke, ar- 
tistlo pianist. Miss Litzel, accomplished 
aerial 1st. Ames A Wlnthrop, good skit. 

PANTAOE8. — Paulino headed excellent bill. 
Hugo B. Koch A Co., in sketch; Evelyn A 
Dolly, versatile. Oolsmlth A Pinard, clever. 
Marie Russell, excellent. 



PALACE HIP.— 25, Adamson A Kekuku's 
Hawaiians, best seen here. Four Novelty Pier- 
rots headline. La Joe Trio, conventional cycle 
act. Nat and Flo Albert, good. Wilson A 
Whitman, went over big. Alexander A Fields, 
comedy honors. Rlva Larson Troupe, headed 
Thursday's bill, novel. Oreen A Pugh, col- 
ored, good. Hartman A Varady, nifty. Wal- 
ter Gilbert, comedy. Murray A Hall, good. 
Clarke A LaVere, well received. 

GRAND — Dark on account oi recent Are. 

COLISEUM. LIBERTY, CLEMMER, MIS- 
SION, STRAND, REX, CLA8S A, MAJESTIC. 
MADISON, IMPERIAL. WASHINGTON. — 
Feature films to good business. 

Edward O. Milne, local manager for Pan- 
tages, Is making a trip over the southern 
s«ction of the Pan circuit. 



ST. LOUIS 

7th and OLIVE STREET 

.SAN FRANCISCO 

PANTAGES THEATRE Bldg. 



Mario Davenport has joined the Monte Car- 
ter Musical Comedy Company at the Oak the- 
atre \ 

The Lyrlo, on Occidental avenue, has again 
changed hands, and reopened after being 
closed for a week. H. Fields la the director 
of the burlesque company playing there. 

West A Boyd have Joined the Del Lawrence 
Co. at the Avenue Jieatre, Vancouver, B. 0. 

Princess Wahletka, the Indian mlndreader, 
is filling vaudeville datee in and around 
SeatUe. 



Karl Shaffer and Ralph Emery are at their 
homes In Los sngcll. A 






Dramatic stock is again at the Orpheum, be- 
ginning Sunday. The Wilkes Musical Play- 
ers, here for the past six weeks, goes to the 
Wilkes Vancouver house, and the company 
now at Vancouver comes to Seattle. Norman 
Hackett and Phoebe Hunt will play leads. 

wmmfm — * 

Jamee Barrle Norton,. a Juvenile stock actor 
well known on the Pacific coast, has Joined the 
Del Lawrence Company at the Avenue theatre 
in Vancouver, B. C. 



Minnie Larson le with the Parson Musical 
tab show at the Colonial, this city. 

8. A. McCarthy, the Australian yodler, la 
forming a new act. A whistler and banjolat 
will be secured. 






Bert Vincent and Jack Owen are playing 
Chlcagoward. 

Jos St. Peter, manager of the Rose theatre, 
Everett, was In Seattle lately on business. 



HARRY VAN FOSSEN 



■ 









THE MAN THAT PUT THE "IT IN FUN AND PUTS FUN IN YOU 
Featured in "WATCH YOUR STEP" 

Playing the part created by Frank Tinney, but offering my own original material. 



Thi* .Week ( FeK 5 )— Montiuudk, .Brooklyn 

Next Week (Feb. 12)— Bronx Opera House, New York 



• * +**"'.»** 



*>»•• - * .-> ** > * **■*■ • 



"Did I Ull you about the wildcat V* 



VARIETY 




RANK 






CLAYTON 



AND 



LENNE 



44 



OIM 



ff 



16 minutes of clean, solid laughter. Well prove it to , 
you at the COLUMBIA THEATRE, NEW YORK, 
SUNDAY (Feb. 11th). 






Direction, 







We have encountered a rainbow of success in the Ocean 

of vaudeville. 






MOSS EMPIRE 



LONDON, ENG 




MAX FORD 
(Four Fords) 



And His TLII* Pal 
HETTY URMA 



MAX FORD and HETTY URMA 



in dear "OLE LONNON 



W 



John Welch haa joined the Parson Musical 
Comedy company. 

The Grace Twins are heading toward Gotham. 



George T. Hood, local representative of the 
Northwest Theatrical Association and man- 
ager of the Moore theatre for the past several 
years, haa resigned as manager of the Moore. 
Frank Hood, treasurer, and Gertrude Slorah. 
assistant treasurer, also resigned at the same 
time. Mrs. Hugh Rood, owner of the Moore, 
accepted the resignations. It la not known 
just what will he done as to the management 
of the house between now and next August, 
when the Orpheum shows will be houaed there. 



Link A Leslie (formerly the Eaton Boys) 
have joined the cast of the Wilkes' Players at 
the Orpheum. 

The Colonial, South Bend, was destroyed by 
a fire Aug. 26, which did $100,000 damage to 
the bualness district of the city. Guests in an 
adjoining hotel had narrow escapes. 



SPOKANE. 



'What 



Ray ("Honey") Harris Is now directing the 
chorus of the Wilkes Musical Players. 



AMERICAN— American Players In 
Happened to Mary." « 

AUDITORIUM.— 3, "Lilac Domino" to good 
business ; 5, Flonzaley Quartet, under auspices 
of the Spokane Symphony Orchestra; 6-12, 
"Intolerance," film spectacle. 

HIPPODROME.— Week. 25, Norrls' Baboons 
headline bill for first half. Cameron A Davett. 
skit, "The Groom Forgot," humorous. Milano 



Four, good harmonists. Challls A Lambert, 
pleased. Adams A Mangles, excellent. Art 
Adair, comedy honors. The Aeroplane Girls, 
headline Wednesday's show, sensational. Met- 
ropole 4, good; Mlspah Belblnl A Co., versa- 
tility. Belle Bocbus A Co., good. Hall A Beck, 
hit. Castle A Davis, ovation. 

PANTAGBS.— Week 26, Belleclair Bros., 
headlining, sensational turn. 'Telephone 
Tangle," novelty. Bobby A Nelson, reg'stered 
nicely. Elizabeth Cutly, pleasing. Australian 
Woodchoppers, good. Good bill. 

CLEMMBR8. — 1016 Pendleton Round-Up pic- 
tures. Mrs. Vernon Castle in opening chap- 
ters of "Patrla." 

LIBERTY.— Dorothy Glsh In "The Little 
Tank." Frank Keenan In "The Bride of Hate." 

CASINO.— Virginia Pearson in a Fox fea- 
ture, "A Tortured Heart." Mabel Taliaferro 
in "A Wife by Proxy." 



• CLASS A.— Valeska Suratt In "The Straight 
Way." Gladya Coburn in "The Primitive 
Call." 

REX AND UNIQUE.— Photoplays. 

ARENA.— Ice skating and hookey. 

Owing to a change la routings, "The Lilac 
Domino*' hero hat one night Instead of two. 

The Lorelei Clnb concert and cantata, "Sir 
Oluf," at the Davenport, Tuesday, was largely 
attended. 



Farewell week for Henry Hall at the Ameri- 
can theatre. 



OH ! \*V H A 




IM 




I 



Gus Hoger is the new manager of th« Still- 
well theatres, succeeding B. W. Copeland, who 
goes to New York for the Oregon- W ashin gton 
Feature Film Co. 



IM I ! Z ! I 




44 



OH! 



THE SCREAMINGLY FUNNY COMEDY SONG 

JOHNNY, OH! JOHNNY! 

Words by ED. ROSE Music by ABE OLMAN 

THE OVERNIGHT SONG SENSATION FEATURED BY 



OH! 



•• 



Henry Lewis % Anna Held Big Show 



"Follow 

(Me") 



Address: 



R MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc. 

Suite 42, Grand Opera House, Chicago, 111. (MARVIN LEE, Mgr. Prof. Dept) 
New York Office, Hotel Princeton, 116 W. 45th St. (Tom Payton in charge) 






PAMAHASIKA 



PETS 



VARIETY 



49 




= 



JOHN T. DOYLE mJ GO. 



U 



NOW TOUUNO IN 

The Danger Line w — A Genuine Novelty 

This Wnk (Feb. S)-PuUfn, Salt Lake City 
Next WMk (Feb. 15-17)-PanUgea, Ogden, Utah 



THE ORIGINAL IDEA 



KOKONAYNIA CLUB 
We opened In 



N«r Members— Al K. HalL 
Otto 8piu. Sohnlu and ttoth. 

MaiBT Ear la In town this 
Nk. Martha Hlckai 



lckey you sure 
got to be a nrell girl, ao Julaa 
says. Benny Howard plaaaa 
drop ma a Una. Honorable line- 
up of our act. Harry Mayan 
(vary Important). Julaa Hummel 
(important), lack Hoffmas 
(foreman). Jerome Tobin and 
Ban Burke (ad lib). 




"A FEATURE ACT THAT 18 INVARIABLY THE I tILL" 

A f 




IC KAY'S 8CH 

The flrat and only ragtime Bagpipe Band In America. A feature with McKAY'8 SCOTCH RBWB. 



KATHARINE DANA'S 

"FISHERS FOLK" 

UNITED TIME 



, GEO. W. CARRIE 

BARBIER, THATCHER and CO. 



In THE WAY OUT" 



Booked Sobai 



Directi*., ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



■•rry-HOLMES and LEVERE -F!.rrie 



PRESENTING THEIR COME* Y SETT 
«« T" Baal MT WkM fMETI V/ETAM 



Solid. 



By TOMMY GRAY 

Difctiecw ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 




ELIZABETH SHIRLEY 



RAYMOND BOND in "REMNANTS" 



IVIOOIM and MORRIS 



Ho 



"The War Cry." Jan. 29th 
We enderstand that Moon and Morris, who are playing Ealth'a. Washi ng ton, thla 
for the Britlah Government. (We think thla la a STALL.) 

Direction - H. B. MARlNELLl 



ED. F. REYNARD 

Presents 

Mile. BIANCA 

The Claaaic Dancer with n Production 



MLLE. BIANCA 



Presents 



ED. F. REYNARD 

The Ventriloqulat With n Production 



I i ■ if i M r i I 



Jaahte^^ki^ 



Sam Cohen, former manager of BM Opokano 
ind Empress theatres, haa returned 'to the city 
md announced he will probaly soon reopen the 
Strand as a combination house, using three 
trta of vaudeville and pictures at a 5-cent and 
l()-cent tariff. The new Kellle-Durns or Fisher 
igency would supply the vaudeville attrac- 



B. W. Copeland, secretary and treasurer of 
the Stlllwell Theaters Co., operating the 
Casino, Class A, Rex and Unique theatres here, 
haa resigned. He will leave next week for 
New York city, where he will represent Spo- 
kane's only picture producing organisation, 
the Oregon- Washington Feature Film Com- 
pany, of 110 Post street. In New York Mr. 




Next Week 
(Feb, 13) 



Keith's 
Washington 



Perman—t Addrooai VARIETY, New York 



■■% mm C BEN g-ganjBaw DOLLY 

Ryan and Ryan 



AND 



ENTERTAINERS OF THREE CONTINENT! 
COMEDY DUO EXPERT ECCENTRIC TERPSICHOREAN DANCERS 

Booked ea4id W. V. M. A. Western Re,.. JESSE FREEMAN. Eaitsrs Res^ MARK L1VY. 



PRINCE 



KARMIGRAPH 
NUMBER 



(Address VARIETY, New York) 



KAR-MI 

VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST 

ILLUSIONIST SAYS: 

HE IS NOW PLAYING RETURN DATES OVER THE 
"POLI CIRCUIT" WHICH SHOWS 



Class 



"KAR-MI GETS THEM IN" 



ORUt-N 



by "SIR" JAR. DWYER ha THE LAW 




LITTLE DIXIE HARRIS 



QL$&t)\&wa < \W5k> 



U. t. enro- 



lls VAUDEVILLE 




Week of Jan. Ilnd 




Van and Belle, lying missile 
Temple thla week, have the gr ea t s* novelty ef 
the season. Their oomedr In the high lights 
is good and Miss Belle's laughter ulnfaonoas 
and natural. 

Direction, HARRY WEBER 



THE CLEVER MUSICAL COMEDY TENOR 



THE COMIC OPERA BASSO 



bert WAINWRIGHT and Wm. Ho WHITE * co. 

» "A Holland Romance 99 

A MINIATURE OPERA Of ONE ACT BY 



HIGH CLASS SINGING 



COMEDY 



IY AND COJTUM1S 



ROLAND TRAVERS 

THE ILLUSIONIST EXTRAORDINARY 

Next Week (Feb. 12)-K.ith , s, Philadelphia 



This Week (Feb. 5) 
Keith's. Providence, R. L 



DIRECTION, MORRIS & FEIL 



STUART 
BARNES 

Direction, JAMES E. PLUNKETT 



George M. Rosener 

Tfcg Rnwr— nUtiv CkarmaWr After 

•f Amwricn- Vi 



Copeland will handle the eastern state rights 
of the 1010 Pendleton (Ore.) Round-Up pic- 
tures. .W!T,*4t7\ otjM?a of the rlcif-e arc now 
to uhh rti Cab**]** auu lue United Slates. 



The cold, blustering weather of the past few 
days haa had a noticeable effect on show 
patronage. 

Rlchardaon A Talbot Players are now play- 
ing in the vicinity of Lewlson, Idaho. 



HARRY JENNIE 

PRATT and PRATT 

CLASSICAL AND POPULAR 
VOCAL SELECTIONS 



50 



VARIETY 







7 BENNETT 7 

O SISTERS O 



W. E. WHITTLE 




Ventriloquist 



Remarkably 

w«o 

AD 



ONE WORD 

TO THE WISE MANAGER 
IS 

SUFFICIENT 

VESPO 

DUO 

ACCORDIONIST and SfNGER 



Managers and Agent* 
are hereby notified a new act known as 



and O'Rourke 

recently at the Fifth Avenue, have taken 
our act bodily. We hope to protect our 
own original material, with your assistance. 

SMITH 

AND 

KAUFMAN 

in "A Midnight Occurrence** 



»» »*.>• h ./>■'»(■->. y n ~i 



Muscular 
Maid, in 

m and Mai 
Maneuvers 



Direction 

MAX E. 
HAYES 



BILLY 

NEWELL 



► . . . >.\ | 



ELSA 

MOST 

With 

Menlo Moore's 

"Joy Riders" 

W.V.IM. ia. U.I.O 




VALDO «< CO 




HOKUS POKUS 

"Somewhere in 

Canada" 

These two-a-day 
houses mske one 
feel important. But 
I miaa that jolly old 
six o'clock Frolic. 

PETE MACK, 

Director-General 



TEX and MABEL 



SHEA 

Present 
CLEVER COMEDY - PRETTY GIRLS 

Palace Theatre, Detroit, Mich., Indefinitely 



RETURNING TO VAUDEVILLE 

After Two Year, in Musical Review 

Bffly 

SEYMOUR and 

Hnasl 

WILLIAMS 

IN A NEW TRAVESTY 

"WHEN DO WE EAT" 

IS Minutes of Laughter and Song 

N. B.-We still retain ALL RIGHTS to 
our other act. So keep off! 




CAMILLE 
PERSONI 

"The Butterfly Girl" 
of Vaudeville 



FRANK TERRY CAN GIVE YOU SUCCESS 




P 



Good material means "SUCCESS," and Frank 
Terry can write any kind of material you may re- 
quire. Try him. These people have: 

Miss Alios Lloyd. Maris Lloyd. Vesta TUley. But* Roye. 
Alms Gray. Lillian Doherty. Marie Hart. Klo and OlUe 
Walters. Annie Kent. Queanle Dunedin. Messrs. Oolding and 
Keating, Barrows and Brown. Nabbott and Wright, Raymond 
and Caver]?. McCormsck and Shannon, Hammerer and How- 
land, Orren and Drew, Dave Thuraby. Tom Almond, Harry 
Ulynn. Sandy Shaw, Geo. Auger. Meredith and Snoozer, 
KuwM'll Yokes. Creo. Wilkle Bard. George Robey, Little Tlch. 

.'.'' 1.'' :. '.". . et f - ' \ tc t " '. » - "i .'! ."." '. 

Nots asw address and telephone. 

FRANK TFRRY Th « Elmeford. Stf West «tth St. 
* *^^**^** * *-i*W*W 1 N#w York city, Phone Bryant 7720 

CALL. WRITE. OR PHONE. TERMS TO 8UIT. 



MIKE 




and MARTY 



McHALE 



IN VAUDEVILLE' 



WALLY I VANHOFF and 
tM Original KARL VAR VARA 

Russia's Foremost Tenor and Pianist 




BACK AGAIN 




I 



THE BRADS 

Ten Minutes In "One" 



Enjoying the 



S Best 



MODELS DE LUXE 

Over the W. V. M. A. 

Direction. HARRY SPINGOLD 



SINGING 



COMEDY 



DANCING 



LITTLE JERRY 

The Smallest Man With the 
Biggest Voice 

TOURING THE COAST IN VAUDEVILLE 



j« / y- » '0 > %•<$ 




BILLY 



GEORGE 



Lloyd " i Britt 

In • "Mixture of Vaude ville." by Ned Dandy 
. (Fob. 8-11) Palace, Newark, N. J. 

Direction, HARRY FITZGERALD 




Mile. La Toy s Canine Models 

Vaudeville's Prettiest Offering 
Booked solid W. V. M. A. and U. B. O. 
East Rep. HARRY SHEA 

West. Rep. JESS FREEMAN 



SHERLOCK SISTERS 




y United Time 

Direction. GEO. CHOOS and BILLY GRADY 



BARD ELL 

Juggler Supreme "A Little 



'ft rains and A hi lit v Plus a Mftnocfv" 



Mr. PELHAM LYNTON 

with Mrs. Lanytry Lady de Hath* on her OpheumTour 



■seeawswBasaftewsssMBWBsnsiB^B^BMBMee 

Were We a Hit in New York? 

YES— 

But "The Call of the Wilds" Ia Strong 






KIM 



ARNOL 





- V s •* •■ ■■ - .»,, 



* m m- »» ■ 



EDWARD S. KELLER, Palace Theatre Building, New York 



VARIETY 




VVeW cot* lots 

of c*rv*baA04^rvi "A if 

VYaltVr yV«™* 

l?o** blade -fo-"- 

ajjco-^ caIIsa/d. 



l/o 



Jlf. 



JUMPM& ONER THREE CHAIRS fcND ft 




Thto Witk (Feb. 5)-MaJeetic, Houston, Ts 
Next Week (Feb. 12)-Majeetic, San An- 
tonio, Tea. 



BILLY SCHEETZ 



BETTY ELDERT 



<« 



Whittier's Barefoot Boy" 

A CLASSIC IN "ONE" 

Direction, NORMAN JEFFERIES. 

Nolan tad Nolan and Blllie Reeves say: 
What you aaid last week goes doable, 
▲loan: Ha* Joe broken hi* typewriter? 



BESSIE 

MORIN SISTERS 




Direction. HARRY WEBER 




• • 



MESSRS. HUGHES AND SMITH 

Present THE PINT-SIZE PAIR 

JOE 

LAURIE and 

ALEEN 

BRONSON 

■ "LOST AND FOUND" 

Weston and Claire sent me "a sholt" I always 
aaid they did a rood art. 

Tom Kerr at last has shown his independence 
and preferred to wear "old shoits." so he sent 
them to me. 

Thanks, boys. Who's next? Nolan Is going right 
along. 




If chickens would 

come noma to roost, 
the roosters wouldn't 
stay out «o Into. 

BILLY 
BEARD 

"The Party from 
the South" 

Direction, 

Harry Weber 




NOLAN 
NOLAN 




This Woak (Feb. 5)-Colonial, Now York 
Next Woak (Feb. 12)-AIhambra. Now York 

Agent. NORMAN JEFFERIES. 



((?(HAUKOLOG-V ALWAYS 
l ^* 'MCLUD6-5 A POMTlCflC* 

QG Civic C^^tooa) /aJ col- 
ors OF LOCAL. ItiTGReST- 

iM rtie ci-ry a)K«7?c Cuaeeun 
<W T«e <<or^Gesri*jG- F>vce.s 

A«JX> PSR 50MftCr€"S /AJ THS" 
AlOOteMCE* fl««=~ T^AITHR/CLV 
9aRTRtK**EP (AJ Cocoas 

SouvewifBS TO THE CL6CT 
# TMi 3 RS Arote 4F F CWAUO 
OLOO-y CAK/AJOT ©€■ OtfCnV- 
65r/A1rire?0- 



u 



MANHATTAN" Fred Duprez 

Bradford "Telegraph": 




'(Perhaps the most norel thing 
about the piece is the Individual 
contribution of Mr. Fred Duprex. 
who appears ss the resourceful Mr. 
HtiiirtfH"', from the "other side." 
and Is mainly responsible for the 
real hilarity of the entertainment. 
There is something sardonlo in his 
humour that arrests attention, and 
he possesses that Inestlmsble gift of 
subtlety which la worth acres of 
mere superficiality. His song of *No 
Place to Go.' with its various appli- 
cations, runs to many 'extras.' There 
Is more of Mr. Dupres than there 
is of Mr. Manhattan, but without 
him. so to speak. Mr. Manhattan 
could hardly contrive to exist." 

SAM BAERWITZ "%*£" 



and 



FRANK WHITTIER VS 

Presenting 

"The Bank Roll" 



Direction. WESLEY OFFICE. 








mrio 




AftTBTic Bin Or 
Versatility 

Direction, 

NORMAN JEFFERIES 




HOWARD 
LAR6F0RD 

Principal Comedian wltk 
"Katlaka" 
Direction, Chamberlain Brown 




MARTYN and FLORENCE 

(Vaudeville's Best Opening Act) 

Next Woak (Feb. 12)-B. S. Moss' Regent 
and Hamilton Theatres 

Personal Direction, 

MARK LEVY. 



! 



Loney Haskell. 
Friend Loney: 

Tour letter and card reached us at last, having 
toes forwarded ts three e? fctar-dlfferert adPvnri. 
Many thanks for the interest you have shown in our 

The Special Delivery and messenger boys will 
work overtime in Columbus this weak. 
BRUCI WEYMAN Is in town. 



P. 8.— An 
week. 

TRULY 8HATTUCK and MARTHA 
(seme mob), and a couple of regulars. 



large (crowd) In Columbus this 

GOLDEN 



JIM and MARIAN 
HARKINS 

Direction, NORMAN JEFFERIES 



After Visiting;. One boa ins to Realise why 
the Sfth St. Rooming Houses are 

ABUNDANT WITH ACROBATS 

One) Trip Up A Flight Of Stairs Suffices. 

1. Stops. Like Teeter Boards. 

2. Bannisters. Have no Will of their 



U HAVE 2 B 

An Acrobat to gat Up and Down stairs. 

JIMMY FLETCHER 



Stoil Tour 



"The Dublin Dandy* 

(Regards to Freddy James) 



Direction. Mark Levy 



THE 
BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION 

Catherine! 
Crawford 

AND HER 

FASHION; \ 
GIRLS m 



Arthur Pearson 




THIS NEVER HAPPENS 

To A Single 



"Hard Look caught up with us 
My partner has a cough. 

Bo let mo sleep In the morning. 
The first hah*, ws LAY OFF.*' 



Harry Sydell 

The Splitweek Sarah Bolnhardd" 
Loew Cirkit Direction. 

Mark Levy 



BLACKFACE 



EDDIE ROSS 

Neil O'Brien Minstrels 
ls-17 

Permanent Address, VARIETY, New York 




PAULINE 
SAXON 

SAYSi 

At times when everything 
goes wrong end trouble comes 
both thick and strong. I sing a 
little cheerful song and thus I 
kid nyself along. 



<« 



BABE 



»» 



FLORENCE 



COOPiPEMPONI 

Will be with you soon in bits of vaudeville 




HELLO. 

Porta J. WW 

r. . , 

The folks wrote 
me that you 
rted 



fishing outfit uttk 
you. but they for- 



got to 
reason I 

Heard that Guy 
and "BUI" Stuart 
got some dandy 
pickerel up at Bar! 
f site's last 



mer while you slept 
peacefully la the 

hammock I 



WSOSSIDE 

KENNE 



WALD. 



IDIOTORIALS 
A deaf and dumb man was convicted recently 
when the state showed moving pictures of his con- 
versation in two reels. 

This much can be said for the Goldfish: It at 
least never tries to sing. 



Building laws do not compel Jails to hsve exits 
marked la red llgbta 

Fred (Hank) 





Harry (Zeke) 



© R E E IM 



(and Cat) 
In -MAGIC PILLS" 
Direction. MAX GORDON 




Clyde Phillip. 

Offers 

ITiext Beautiful Act 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 

BIRDS 

Talent Tells 

If you're from M is so ur i 

we can show you. 

See MARK MONROE 
lew BROADWAY 

i 




AS A "DANCER" 
-SECOND TO NONE** 

VERA 
SABINA 



_ Let Angeles "Exam leer" 

Mile. Vera Babina 
pantomimic choreography with 
wonderful suppleness and 



Her side, Maurice Spltasr is s 

living amhodlment of the colorful 

Bakst fantasies. 

t "Arabian Nights" wss their 

best effort; costumes and settings 

of tho Far East marked the triple 

number. 

Direction, 

MAX GORDON 



JANET 
ADAIR 

m 

"Song Definitions 99 

Assisted bw 

EMMA ADELPHI 

Booked solid Orpheum. U. B. O. sad 

Interstate 

Direction, HARRY WEBER 



THE FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A SUPREME OFFERING 
Representative, JACK FLYNN 

KELT and DeMONT 



^ 



IRWIN'S MAJESTICS 



■VI 

and tVI 



IM 



K 



THE SINGER AND THE DANCER 

Playing; Loew Circuit 

Direction. TOM JONES. 



CLAUDE 



Goldingafid Keating 

Booked solid W. V. M. A. 

Eestern Rep., ROSE A CURTIS 

Western Rep., BEEHLER A JACOBS 



lRIKT Y 



= 



as 



|» .»• . >-V j». • 



J* » I >. . 



*»•■ >•»-• *#"•■ ^ *:•*■ m ..»•■- jn*- >*■»♦ .*.»•■ >>- 



• • >. • J, . 



•>•' •■ >• • 






,»..,. ,:»... ,».. , 



- 



*•■■• # w *»*" ' 4*** ■ ' i»< 



1 



























Charley Grapewin's Opinion 















• 






- 






r 









Omaha, Feb. 2, 1917. 

NOW that the vaudeville artists have a club (and 
a real club), where he can not only meet his 
fellow artist, but can chat with the manager 
he has heard about but has never met, and find 
that they are human beings and not slave drivers and 
robbers as some of them have been led to believe, he will 
take a new interest in his profession, and not follow a 
leader, but be one of the leaders — not only try to keep 
up to the times, but to try and be a little ahead of the 

times. 
The N. V. A. I know will convince the smaller artist, 

especially the new recruit, that the manager is more than 

willing to meet him half way. These conditions have 

always existed, only some of the vaudeville artists did 

not know it; they let others think and dictate to them. 

I have had 20 years in vaudeville, and during that time 
I have never had a contract broken or a misunderstand- 
ing with a manager. All you have to do is produce the 
goods, attend to your own business, make it a point to 
meet the manager, and you will find the man who owns 
the frame will be pleased to place your picture in it. Now 
that the N. V. A. is such a splendid success, I for one would 
like to see a sick insurance for the vaudeville actor in his 
old age and a place for him to rest — not a poorhouse, but 
a home he has helped build for himself, where he can go 
when he has outlived his usefulness — not as an object of 
charity, but as one of the owners — a place he can refer 
to as home. 

I want to live to see that place. 






CHARLEY GRAPEWIN 












>• • *'i ,*»■;* »-■ . . ■ J0t> 



>»> >^» * . i ^ • 



' *> . .#• 4 > • / 



*• • . . > ,■ *, 













TEN CENTS 







. 



VOL. XLV, No. 12 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




VARIETY 



CUADIDA DCDMtTCIM §L Aft MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

OnRrlnU, DLUnOICin O UU., LOUIS BERNSTEIN, President 



We take pleasure in announcing one of 

the most marvelous new ballads ever 

placed before the American public 




By BALLARD MACDONALD and JAMES HANLEY 



\. 



TWO OTHER TERRIFIC SUCCESSES 



ft 



The wonderful novelty sensational hit rag 

They're Wearing 9 Em Higher in Hawaii" 



by JOE GOODWIN andlHALSEY MOHR 



The Marvelous sentimental song hit 





by BALLARD MACDONALD, JAMES HANLEY and EDWARD MADDEN 



SHAPIRO, BERNSTEIN & CO 



CHICAGO 
Grand Opera House Bldg. 



224 WEST 47th STREET 
f NEW YORK CITY 

TRISCO 
Pantages Theatre Bldg. 




VOL. XLV, No. 12 



NEW YORK CITT, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1117 



PRIC1 TBN CINTS 



AMERICAN MANAGER HIRES ALL 
ENGLISH CAST TO SUPPORT STAR 



Oliver Morosco Has Only English Players in "The Fugitive" 
With Emily Stevens. American Actors Already In- 
censed Through Preference Given English at 
Lower Salaries. Advocating Protest to 
Press Throughout Country. 



Already inwardly if not outwardly 

furious at those American producing 

managers who have made it a practice 

to give preference to English players 

in casting pieces, the Americans have 
what they claim is an undeniable com- 
plaint against Oliver Morosco, who is 
reported to have secured an all-Eng- 
lish cast in support of Emily Stevens 
in "The Fugitive," a new piece now in 
rehearsal and tor open out of town the 
latter part of the month. 

Several of the better -known Ameri- 
can players are advocating voicing a 
protest to the press throughout the 
country, explaining the conditions and 
asking in the publicity that the Ameri- 
can public refrain from patronizing 
legitimate productions put upon the 
stage solely with an aim to economy in 
the salary list at the expense of home 
talent 

One of the best known of American 
actors, now playing an indefinite en- 
gagement in a Broadway theatre and 
who is never idle unless he so wills, 
probably expressed the feeling of all 
American players when commenting 
upon this phase of American theatri- 
cals that has become more pronounced 
since the war started. He said that, 
aside from all pertinent queries that 
might ask what these English actors 
are doing over here in these moment- 
ous times to their country, the Eng- 
lish people have grown notorious 
for working cheaply, cutting under an 
American's salary for a role, and think- 
ing nothing of offering themselves at 
say $100 for a part an American would 
ask $200, making other salary cuts 
porportionately to secure an engage- 
ment 

"Perhaps you don't know," he con- 
tinued, "that many of these same Eng- 
lish actors now working for* $100, more 
or less, a week were playing in the 
English provinces for - oac or- two 
pounds ($5 or $10) weekly. It can be 
proved and it is well known to many 
of us. 

"You have no idea of the number of 
English actors now over here. They 
can be secured' for any figure and the 



matter has passed beyond the joking 
point An American actor builds up 
his standing in the profession through 
years of application and hard work. He 
may be sent for, but when telling 
his salary is told to call again in a day 
or so while an effort is made by the 
manager to procure an English sub- 
stitute at about one-half the weekly 
money the American wanted. 

"And the Englishman gets the job. 
He is always ready for a job, at any 

f>rice, with few exceptions, and it 
eaves to the American only the picture 
of an American manager unloval to his 
countrymen for the matter of the dol- 
lars he can shave on the salary list 

"The English had no compunction in 
venting their attitude toward the Amer- 
ican actor over there and they have 
been doing it right along, publicly and 
privately, although if the Englishmen 
who should be at the front with their 
fighting forces were there. England 
would require foreign artists to enter- 
tain those at home. 

"I, for one, am i:. favor of a thorough 
campaign against this wholesale engag- 
ing of English actors, with Americans 
left to walk the streets because they 
have not been bred to look for more 
salary abroad than they can earn in 
their native land, knowing that the 
least they will get away from home 
will be treble what they ever before 
received." 

The discussion of the English actor 
in America has been going on for some 
time. A large number have reached 
these shores since the war started and 
their presence has been felt by the 
Americans for a long time. Many per- 
sonal contacts between American and 
English actors have been narrowly 
averted in the Lambs' Gub, where 
many Englishmen seemed so welcomed 
they quickly became members. 

In the past there have been plays 
casted with aYt Enp!:s!i players, an- 
nounced to travel in Canadian territory 
only, although some of these played a 
portion of the States. 

If you doa't adwrtlM 1m VARIETY, 
doa't atartiM. 



CHICAGO'S $3,750,000 THEATRE. 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 

Mort Singer has announced Martin 
Beck and the estate of Charles E. Kohl 
have taken a 99-year lease from the 
Marshall Field Estate on the half 
block on the west side of State street, 
extending from Lake street to Couch 
place. 

The ground is valued at $2,500,000. 
It is the intention to build a theatre 
seating 3,000. at a cost of $1,250,000. 
There will be a 16-story office and 
shop building in conjunction with the 
theatre. 

Work of dismantling structure now 
on site will commence in mid-summer. 
House to be ready for summer, 1918. 
Policy will probably be vaudeville, at 
a lesser admission scale than now 
charged at Majestic and Palace, owned 
by the same vaudeville interests. 



' "HYPHEN" TAKEN OFF. 

"The Hyphen," a "war sketch," with 
a decided German tendency, has been 
removed from the vaudeville stage, 
with the different complexion lately 
given to our international affairs. 

Up to the time of its abandonment 
the sketch had been playing steadily. 

OLD TIMERS 9 BILL 

Scran ton, Pa., Feb. 14. 

Poli's for the first half next week 
(with the second half to be played at 
Poli's, Wilkes-Barre) will have an "Old 
Timers' Week." 

The bill in its running order is Fox 
and Ward, John F. Clark, Ed Blondell 
and Co., Charles B. Lawlor and Daugh- 
ters, Ward and Curran. 



BLACKFACE PLAYLET. 

Five nlayers in blackface led by Ed- 
mund Breese will shortly play a sketch 
in vaudeville. 

M. S. Bentham is attending to the 
booking, also looking after the vaude- 
ville direction of Isabel Irving, who, 
with Charles Wineate, will revive 
"The Woman Intervenes" as a play- 
let. 



NEW OPERETTA CLOSES. 

Baltimore, Feb. 14. 

The Shuberts decided to close "The 
Fair Unknown" here on three days' 
notice last week. 

At present the verdict is that the 
piece will be shelved. 



Oat Shortage Closes Little Theatre. 

Cincinnati. Feb. 14. 

Tht lAt'At T-f.vyiK/Viye -ha*J>een- ctotftii' 
owing to the shortage of illuminating 
gas. 

"Blanchette" wa .-. listed for Wednes- 
day and Thursday. Manager W. W. 
Martin claims the company will lose 
$300 owine to the closing. 



THOMAS AND OPERA. 

During the week the Shuberts finally 
removed the name of John Charles 
Thomas from the billing of "Her Sol- 
dier Boy" at the Astor, although the 
baritone has been out of the production 
for the last three weeks. The 45th 
Street theatre still has Thomas' name 
on painted stretchers <and the printed 
three-sheets. 

Broadway rumqr has it a theatrical 
manager with lots of Pittsburgh wealth 
behind him has become interested in 
the singer and is willing to finance him 
in a course of study for the operatic 
stage. 

BROADWAY WEEK STAND. 

Mme. Nazimova will play Broadway 
for one week with a proven success. 
" 'Ception Shoals" is to move from the 
Princess to the Fulton for a week and 
then make way for "Pals First" (with 
William Courtenay and Thomas Wise). 

Meantime Walter F. Wanger is try- 
ing to secure another house for the 
"Shoals" star. 



"FOLLIES" GIRLS MARRYING. 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 

When the Ziegfeld "Follies" leave 
here two members will remain behind. 

Mae Carmen is to marry Maurice 
Dekker, an importer of New York, and 
Mabel Callahan is the bride-to-be of J. 
D. Cable, a broker. Miss Carmen's en- 
gagement hapnened after a courtship 
of less than a month. 



AL WILSON DOING "IRISH." 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 

Al. H. Wilson is no more a "dutch" 
comedian, he having switched his role 
from German to ; a Irish characterisa- 
tion without changing the show and 
in that way playing it safe with all 
audiences. 

His show is touring Canada and is 
reported enjoying its most prosperous 
season. 



FLORIDA'S COLDEST. 

Tampa, Fla., Feb. 14. 

The coldest weather in 20 years down 
here has caused thousands of dollars 
loss by frosts. 

The South Florida Fair had to close 
last week through it Fifty-eight thou- 
sand paid admissions. The prospects 
were very bright. 

George Steffey, of the Kennedy Car- 
nival Co., broke his leg while disman- 
tling the show. 

CHICAGO'S FIRST MATINEES. 

Chicago, "Feb. 14. 
All Loop theatres played Lincoln's 
Birthday matinee Monday, for the first 
time in the history of the Loop, all 
doing big business. 



tABLlTS 



PROHIBITIVE ENGLISH TAX 

REDUCES SALARIES ONE-HALF 

Returning Americans Predict Government Will Exact 50 Per 

Cent, on Alien Incomes by Aug. 1. Railroads Increase 

Rates and Cut Baggage Weight Allowance. 

Managers Reducing Shows. 



The income tax in England will be 
12 shillings on the pound, or about 
$2.50 on every $5 earned, by August 1, 
next, according to Billy Gould, who re- 
turned to New York on the "Kroon- 
land" Sunday. 

The present income tax amounts to 
•ix shillings on the pound or about 22 
per cent of the actor's salary abroad, 
said Mr. Gould, who has been on the 
other side a year or longer. 

English railway fares have increased 
50 per cent, since the war and the num- 
ber of trains decreased by one half. Not 
over 112 pounds of baggage is permit- 
ted and any excess must be sent parcel 
post. Everybody must move his own 
baggage with taxis a scarcity. 

While there are plenty of acts abroad, 
said Mr. Gould, the music hall man- 
agers are continually seeking to lessen 
the number engaged. He cited a 90- 
minute melodrama put on by Oswald 
Stoll at Shepherd's Bush shortly before 
he left, 'to make up a variety program 
that could use but three acts besides 
the long playlet 

On the way out of England the 
"Kroonland" passengers saw a German 
submarine sink a Dutch bark, when 
their boat was less than one-quarter 
mile away, but no attention was paid 
by the sub to the neutral craft. In 
mid-ocean, said Mr. Gould, a sub came 
to the surface almost beside the 
"Kroonland" and then dove beneath 
without molesting her. 

The "Kroonland" passengers say the 
German commerce subs, "Bremen" and 
"Deutschland," are now held in Scot- 
land, having been "caught alive" by the 
English. "Caught alive" is an expres- 
sion to indicate the submarines were 
enmeshed in nets, when after a certain 
length of time, long enough to make 
certain any life aboard is extinct, they 
are brought to the surface and towed 
in. In London, it is reported, over 90 
German subs were captured or de- 
stroyed during November and Decem- 
ber last German commanders of sub- 
marines are now said to follow the 
practice, when caught in the nets, of 
blowing up the boat below water as 
their final action. 

On the "Kroonland" coming in also 
was Joe Menchen, who is credited with 
having invented the explosive bullet for 
the Lewis air-cooled rifle now used by 
the English against the Zeps. Menchen 
was formerly a theatrical man in New 
York. 

Robert Lorraine, an Englishman who 
was about the first of his countrymen 
on this side to enlist, is now a Flight 
Commander in England. 

Eugene Houghton, an American re- 
siding in Louisville, who enlisted with 
the rank of captain in a Canadian regi- 
ment, is the first American in the Eng- 
lish army to be decorated. Houghton 
is now a major and was given the Mili- 
tary Cross for valor. The decoration 
was awarded him in December. 

Major Wallace McCutcheon, another 
American and a major in the English 
army, who was home on sick leave, has 
returned to the English fighting front 
in charge of his command. 

Tom Waters, an American artist, go- 
ing over on the "Kroonland." was held 
t\v^ ":Y~y$" or: \io::r^ a( 'Liverpool, al- 
though tinder contract to the Moss Em- 
pires. The Board of Trade regulations 
in England for incoming theatrical 
people under contract for England 



is that the management must present 
itself in person at point of entry and 
guarantee the passenger. This the 
Moss people failed to do for the two 
davs following Waters' arrival. 

Ned Wayburn, Gene Buck and Dave 
Stamper, who left New York Dec. 16 
to put on "Zig Zag" at the London 
Hippodrome, returned on the "New 
York" Sunday. Mr. Wayburn staged 
the Hip show, Buck and Stamper writ- 
ing it 

The boat left Liverpool Feb. 3, after 
the English stewards aboard had de- 
manded the American Line insure their 
lives, which was done. The first 24 
hours out the boat made 62 miles 
through watching for mines. These 
were seen by the passengers, standing 
up out of the water about a foot, with 
a metal cap, often exploded with a 
rifle shot from a boat when a mine is 
in its way. 

Monday the "New York" received an 
"S. O. S." wireless from the "Califor- 
nia," saying she had been torpedoed. 
There were enough Epglish torpedo 
boat destroyers about, so the "New 
York" changed her course to northeast, 
going 420 miles around to avoid sub- 
marines. One submarine bobbed up 
right behind the boat Sunday midnight, 
with an English destroyer three miles 
in the rear. The sub looked the "New 
York" over and then disappeared. 

About to board the boat at Liverpool 
Mr. Wayburn was held up on suspicion 
of being a German and only released 
after he had shown three watches, gifts 
from Albert De Courville and George 
Robey, at the London Hippodrome, 
with the third watch (for the wrist) 
presented to the producer by the chorus 
of that show. When entering their 
stateroom Mr. and Mrs. Wayburn saw 
life preservers carefully laid out in the 
berths. Their room steward informed 
the couple they needn't be frightened of 
submarines, but to watch out for mines, 
and if the boat struck one to put on 
the preservers and jump overboard. 
Mrs. Wayburn wanted to know how 
much weight one preserver could hold 
up, as her husband was not a swimmer. 
The steward replied 240 pounds. Way- 
burn weighs 260 pounds, and he got an 
extra one. 

There are over 1,000,000 Canadian and 
Australian soldiers in London at pres- 
ent, according to the returned New 
Yorkers, waiting to be sent to the front 
for "The Big Push" in the spring. 
These, with the many English officers 
and soldiers returning, along with those 
wounded at home, keep the musical 
comedy houses and variety halls filled 
all the time. 

The London hotels are charging 60 
cents a bucket (small) for coal with 
f.cople obliged to make their own fires. 
Help is scarce all over and food is not 
over-plentiful. 

Wayburn pronounces "London 
Pride," a comedy drama, at Wynd- 
ham's, as London's biggest hit. Gerald 
DuMaurier, Mabel Russell and Will 
West are the three big scores of the 
cast. West, formerly over here, is re- 
ported having put on weight, until now 
he reaches about 290. 

"Chu Chin Chow" at His Majesty's 
is the big musical success over there. 
It- Is a riinsi'c.al version' or "Aii BhIm amV 
the Forty Thieves," written by Oscar 
Asclie. who is the principal player in it. 

If you don't advertise ha VARIETY, 
don't advertis*. 



ALHAMBIA MAKES |Mt,*M. 

London, Feb. 14. 
The Alhambra shows a net profit of 
$100,000 for the first year of Oswald 
(ftoli's direction and a dividend of tem- 
per cent, has been declared. 



GAT MUSICAL COMEDY. 

London, Feb. 14. 

"The Maid of the Mountains" was 
produced at Daly's, Feb. 10. It is a 
gay musical comedy with a good book, 
delightful music, gorgeous settings and 
brilliantly acted. The piece is a pro- 
nounced success. 

Josie Collins, Mabel Sealby, Thorpe 
Bates, Lauri deFrece and a strong com- 
pany are excellent 



MRS. CAMPBELL'S NEW SKETCH. 

London, Feb. 14. 

Mrs. Patrick Campbell is presenting 
at the Coliseum this week a new sketch, 
"Pro Patria," written by her husband, 
George Cornwallis West It failed to 
create any undue excitement. 

The newcomers on the program are 
Felice Lyne, G. H. Elliott and Grock. 



"FELIX," WEAK COMEDY. 

London, Feb. 14. 
At the Haymarket "Felix Gets a 
Month" was produced Feb. 6. It is a 
weak comedy, well acted. 

PALLADIUM HITS. 

London, Feb. 14. 
Joe Elvin successfully produced at 
the Palladium this week a sketch, en- 
titled "The Holy Friar." 

Other successes on the bill are Whid- 
den and Kumming, Odette Myrtil, and 
Maidie Scott 



PRESENTS FOR BUTT. 

London, Feb. 14. 
On behalf of the directors and the 
house staff, Herbert Mason, formerly 
stage manager of the Palace, presented 
Alfred Butt with a gold watch and an 
illuminated address. The presentation 
took place Feb. 9. 



Boucicault's "Land of Promise" Revival 

London, Feb. 14. 
Dion Boucicault revived "The Land 
of Promise" at the New theatre Feb. 8. 
and introduced in the leading male role 
a promising actor named G. H. Mul- 
caster. Irene VanBrugh resumed her 
original part. 




FRANK1E VAN HOVEN 

At the age of three years and 11 months, 
before he knew what the world had in store 
for him. In fact, he doesn't know yet. 
-■ Ftartfci* .*irs\burn FcV.,5, WW, toStM* Cify: 
la. A boy put some cum in his curls and 
they had to be cut off. Frankie was a bad boy 
and any of the other little boys in the neighbor* 
hood caught playing with him were whipped 
by their mammas. Two of these little angels 
turned out to be burglars. 



IN LONDON. 

London, Jan. 29. 
• By arrangement with Alfred Butt, 
Yedreor* >Jinfl.l£Adif «>viU in Mar^h pro- 
duct at the Globe theatre a new three- 
act play (by the authors of "The Man 
Who Stayed at Home"), "The Man 
Who Went Abroad/' in which Iris Hoey 
will play the leading role. To make 
room for this production "Peg o' My 
Heart" will have to find another home. 
The popular "Peg" celebrates its 1,000th 
performance on Feb. 24, thus taking 
fourth place in London runs- to 
"Charley's Aunt," which scored 1,466 
performances on its original production 
in London. 

"Follow the Flag" is the title of W. 
J. Wilson's first production at the 
Olympia, Liverpool, at the end of Feb- 
ruary or early in March. The leading 
feature will be a patriotic pageant 
showing phases of the national spirit in 
our history. The same impulses which 
sent the knights of old to the crusades 
have brought the sons of the Empire 
from the ends of the earth in answer 
to the call of the Motherland. The 
auditorium of the Olympia has been 
partly remodeled and "Follow the 
Flag" will be the first of a series of six 
revues to be produced by Wilson for 
the Moss Empires. In these he has a 
free hand and when one remembers 
that he originated the "Flag 'Scene 
and "Tulip Land" in "Joyland," and the 
Niagara Scene and the Scottish Scene 
in "Razzle Dazzle," great things may 
be expected. 



»» 




NINA PAYNE 

Who is spending the month in Cuba before 
commencing her engagement over the Orpheum 
Circuit. 

CAZMAN DEAD. 

London, Feb. 14. 
Cazman, illusionist, died here Feb. 9, 
aged 53. 

Billy Carleton Replacing Gertie Millar. 

London, Feb. 14. 
Gertie Millar retires from "Houp-La" 
at the St. Martin's. Feb. 17, and will 
be succeeded by (Miss) Billy Carleton. 

"Cinderella* Leaving L. O. H. Feb. 17. 

London, Feb. 14. 
"Cinderella" will be withdrawn from 
the London opera house, Feb. 17, and 
"The Bing Boys Are Here" revived 
there March 5. 



"Monty* Flapper" Old Faihioiied. 

London, Feb. 14. 

"Monty's Flapper," produced at the 
Apollo, Feb. 7, is an old-fashioned farce 
of little merit. 



VAUDEVILLE 



SP 



COAST HOUSES OFFER $1,800 
WEEKLY FOR BURLESQUE SHOWS 



f » ■ ■ i r >r T /» ■-•»•/- 



Ackerman A Harris, With Several Theatres in Western 
i, Will Guarantee Columbia Circuit Attractions 
for 10 Weeks. Columbia Executives to Consider 
Proposal at Next Meeting. 



San Francisco, Feb. 14. 

With the departure last week from 

this city of Jack Singer, one of the 

prominent producing managers of the 

Columbia Burlesque Co. Circuit (east), 

it leaked out Mr. Singer while here was 

in conference with Ackerman & Harris, 

through that firm wishing to make a 

connection with the Columbia to have 
the burlesque attractions of that cir- 
cuit extend their travels to the Coast. 

Ackerman & Harris proposed to 
guarantee each show $1,800 weekly in 
all towns, opening them at Miles City 
and closing the Coast tour at San 
Diego. The travel would include about 
17 cities with at least 10 full playing 
weeks, while the only time lost would 
be three days from Des Moines to the 
opening point, and the time out for 
the next jump from San Diego at the 
end of the trip. 

The Ackerman & Harris proposition 
has been submitted by Sam Harris to 
the Columbia people in New York. A 
reply may have been received by the 
local men by this time. 

Ackerman & Harris recently took 
over several large theatres formerly 
owned by the Sullivan-Considine Cir- 
cuit and in several of the cities now 
operate two houses, also having some 
of the former Sullivan-Considine thea- 
tres over < the proposed burlesque route. 
If the policy of burlesque is taken on 
by the Columbia, the larger nouses will 
continue with Ackerman '& Harris 
vaudeville. The local firm in its vaude- 
ville is affiliated with the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association of 
Chicago. 

The houses at the disposal of bur- 
lesque are Empress, Miles City; Bab- 
cock, Billings; Judith, Lewiston; Pal- 
ace, Great Falls; Liberty, Helena; Em- 
press, Butte; Bijou, Missoula; Grand, 
Wallace; Auditorium, Spokane; Em- 
pire, North Yakima; Liberty, Walla 
Walla; Orpheum, Seattle; Empress 
Portland; Empress, Sacramento; San 
Francisco (name of house not report- 
ed); Los Angeles, new theatre now 
building; Savoy, San Diego. 

At the offices of the Columbia Amuse- 
ment Co. this week, Sam Scribner 
stated a communication had been re- 
ceived from Ackerman & Harris in San 
Francisco and a reply sent the matter 
would be taken up by the Columbia 
board at its next meeting in March. 

Mr. Scribner said he preferred not to 
comment upon the proposal before the 
board has passed upon it. 

The American Burlesque Circuiti 
playing at a lower admission scale than 
its older contemporary, is also con- 
trolled by the Columbia Co. 



DARCVS SHOW'S BIG FINISH. 

The Les Darcy vaudeville venture 
wound up to a big finish, ending at the 
Haymarket, Chicago, last week, where 
the Australian champ figured as the ex- 
tra attraction for the burlesque show 
there. 

Monday Darcy and Freeman Bern- 
stein, his- thcetrisal' manager, reach:;! 
New York on The 20th Century. Tues- 
day Darcy went over to Brown's train- 
ing quarters at Goshen to prepare for 
his first battle on American soil, with 
Al McCoy at Madison Square Garden, 
March 5. 

Bernstein started off Darcy at the 



head of a vaudevile road show that 
played to varying receipts until Free- 
man determined to try burlesque for 
the Australian alone, opening him as 
the special feature at the Academy, 
Pittsburgh, on terms that gave the 
fighter the first $2,000 and an equal split 
on the remainder. The Academy did 
$5,900 the Darcy week. Buffalo was the 
next town with Darcy at the Garden, 
getting the first thousand and a 50-50 
split, Buffalo giving Bernstein-Darcy 
$4,850 gross on the week (Darcy then 
only carrying Freddie Gilmore as his 
sparring partner). From Buffalo they 
went to the Haymarket. playing on a 
straight split and did $6,350, running 
into the cold weather in both the latter 
towns. 

The burlesque weeks evened up the 
ledger, and also got Ben Rosenthal the 
$5,500 he had advanced to the Darcy 
show in Philadelphia. The reports from 
that city when the show left that re- 
turned checks had been given out is 
strenuously denied by all the parties, 
Bernstein saying Rosenthal never is- 
sued a check on the trip and that any 
he (Bernstein) gave were paid on sight, 
while no one else in the party had a 
bank account 

After the Darcy-McCoy fight another 
touring route will be laid out by Bern- 
stein, who will pilot Darcy along until 
another match is arranged for him. 

Bernstein is extravagant in praise of 
the burlesque managements' treatment 
of Darcy and himself, and especially is 
praising Izzy Herk, of the Haymarket. 



N. V. A. DANCE. 

The first dancing evening held by the 
National VaUcleViile "Artists 'in itVcKiib- 
rooms last Thursday night was a most 
enjoyable affair in every way. The 
party commenced to gather immedi- 
ately after theatre and only the club's 
usual closing hour, 3 a. m., caused 
the ending of the affair. 

Between 250 and 300 people attended, 
with about 80 per cent of the attend- 
ance members of the club, who were 
permitted to bring guests. 

The men's writing room was con- 
verted into a dance floor for the even- 
ing and there was no formality of dress. 
The dance evenings will be held by 
the N. V. A. each Thursday. 

The club is reported to have main- 
tained an average of 42 new applica- 
tions for membership daily for the past 
two weeks, the averaging having been 
slightly higher before then and since 
the opening of the club. 

None of the acts "walking out" at 
Boston last week was an N. V. A. 



OLYMPICS FUNNY WAY. 

Tuesday night at the Olympic on 
Nth street a single seat was purchased 
from the speculator in the lobby. In- 
stead of getting the whole ticket the 
purchaser was handed a seat coupon 
and a punched door check bearing the 
date of the day. The doorman looked 
for the punch, and the moment he saw 
it passed the bearer of the ticket. 

When the box office count-up was 
made there should have been the stump 
of the ticket in the deadwood and the 
ticket sold for a 25-cent advance over 
the regular price would be deducted 
from the statement as a complimentary. 
This would work to the disadvantage 
of the show, which splits the gross re- 
ceipts at the Olympic. 



$5,000 MONK DIBS. 

New Orleans, Feb. 14. 

"Prince," the baboon that formerly 
sped around the saucer-like track on a 
motorcycle in the Nederveld animal 
turn, died at the Orpheum here from 
kidney trouble. "Prince" was nine years 
old and a native of Central Africa. 
"Prince" was the only animal to ride 
a motor cycle and was valued at $5,000. 



BATTLE OVER SONG. 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 

The Watson Sisters, at the Palace, 
are using the song, "Me and My Gal." 
Florence Moore demanded she have the 
exclusive use of the number for the 
Palace engagement, but the Watson 
girls refused to discard the song, de- 
claring they would leave the bill first. 

Today Florence Moore was granted 
the right to use the number exclusively. 
The Watson Sisters remained in the 
bill. 



If you don't odvortlM la VARIETY, 
don't odvortlM. 




LEO* TUMBERLr o*a MBNA- ARNOLD 

From last week's VARIETY: L ,„,.,_, 

Leon Kimberly and Rena Arnold (the former being the one-time member of Kimberly and 
Moore and Miss Arnold being the ex-partner of James Donovan) took up the speed where the 
Wilfred Clark organization left it and carried the show along at the height of the going. It 
was a high test for a two-person combination, but, thanks to their swift exchange of wit, 
some of it of the paprika variety, they handled the situation in first rate shape. 

Keith's, Boston, This Week 
Next Week (Feb. 19)— Maryland, Baltimore 

EDWARD S. KELLER. Palace Theatre Building. 



COAST MARITAL TROUBLES. 

San Francisco, Feb. 14. 
. > Up© » the . -fltr-ou nda-i hey vv «. .* t ■ 1 i rai- 
ned but 12 days after an interlocutory 
decree of divorce was obtained from 
her former husband, Raymond H. 
Baldwin, a Los Angeles music dealer, 
was granted an annulment of his mar- 
riage to Mrs. May Chester-Baldwin. 

A suit for divorce has been filed by H. 
E. Craven, picture operator, against his 
wife, Hazel J. Craven, complaining she 
wore tights in a P. P. I. E. parade. 

Testifying she was able to care for her 
three children Mrs. Winifred Babcock 
(author of "Gloria's Romance") has 
been granted divorce without ali- 
mony from her husband, Bertram W. 
Babcock, a New York operatic man- 
ager. 



HAMMERSTEIN TRIAL 

The action of Oscar Hammerstein 
against the United Booking Offices 
over the opening of the Riverside thea- 
tre as a B. F. Keith property was on 
the Supreme Court calendar for yester- 
day (Thursday). 

The Appellate Division last week 
discontinued the injunction obtained 
by Hammerstein in connection with 
the suit restraining the Keith people 
from opening the theatre. A stay on 
the restraining order was immediately, 
obtained at the time. In its decision 
the court said the agreement entered 
into between the United and Hammer- 
stein restricting the number of thea- 
tres to be operated by either, was il- 
legal. 

ADELE BLOOD'S $50,000 NECKLACE. 

Cleveland, Feb. 14. 

The sketch called "The Mannaquen" 
in* which Edna Goodrich exposed her 
wealthy wardrobe for a vaudeville run 
is now at the Hippodrome here, with 
Adele Blood the star of the piece, she 
having replaced Miss Goodrich in the 
playlet. 

In addition to the array of clothing 
Miss Blood wears at each performance 
a ruby necklace costing $50,000 and 
about which she has not told the press 
agents. An ermine coat costing around 
$15,000 is another of* Miss Blood't 
extra attractions. 

The sketch did very well Monday 
with its new star, who walked on the 
Hip stage with hardly a rehearsal. 



GIRL FALLS OUT WINDOW. 

Bay City, Mich., Feb. 14. 

Jennie Bruce fell from her hotel win- 
dow early Mondav morning, sustaining 
a fractured skull and arm with internal 
injuries. She is in a critical condition 
at a local hospital. 

The girl was a chorister with the 
Malone Comedy Co. at the Grotto 
theatre here. 

No cause is assigned for the fall. Her 
companions think she went to the win- 
dow for air and toppled out. 



SHUBERT ENGAGEMENTS. 

Nat Carr, Kerr and Weston and Mil- 
ler and Mack, all vaudevillians, have 
been placed under contract with the 
Shuberts. to appear in Winter Garden 
productions. 

Rufus R. Le Maire did the booking. 



MAUDE LEONE EAST. 

Maude Leone is due to reach New 
York shortly, to appear in "Inside 
Stuff," a sketch written by Willard 
Mack. 

Miss Leone was formerly Mrs. Mack, 
wife of the author. They were divorced. 

. D£ MJLO fkOPES _ 

New Cntairs," Feb. i-». 
De Milo, the vaudeville posing artiste, 
formerly Miriam Hammerstein in pri- 
vate life, eloped with a wealthy piano 
dealer of this city and was married at 
Algiers. La. De Milo was once the wife 
of the late Ahc Hammerstein, a son of 
Oscar. 



•^....H -...- »•*. ■, 







VAUDEVILLE 



-....-.. 



s=-^ 



i* 4 « /» >»• » • I • V >P * 



BOSTON STRIKE BECOMES 

PEACEFUL PICKETING "AFFAIR 

Gordon Theatres Holding Up in Business. Strikers Using 

"Stench Bombs." Pickets Arrested and Fined. Now 

Working in Squads for Five-Minute Periods. 



Boston, Feb. 14. 

The current week has developed 
nothing of interest in the strike being 
waged by the White Rats against the. 
Gordon theatres beyond the establish- 
ment of a final court decision on the 
question of peaceful picketing. Yes- 
terday Judge Duff in the lower court 
found the six pickets, arrested last 
week, guilty of loitering and sauntering 
and fined all $5 each, releasing them on 
real estate bail bonds of $25, when At- 
torney Glynn announced an intention 
to appeal the case to the Superior 
Court 

While all affected theatres are pick- 
eted the Rats have instructed the 
pickets to work in five-minute relays to 
prevent further arrests. 

James W. FiUPatrick is making a 
desperate effort to procure the support 
of the local labor organizations and has 
succeeded in interesting the executives 
of the Central Labor Union, but be- 
yond a promise of moral support the 
local unions have not indicated any in- 
tention of backing the Rats in their 
local strike. Next Sunday the Central 
Union will hold its regular semi-month- 
ly meeting and Fitz Patrick will endeavor 
to have the theatres formally placed on 
the unfair list 

While the Rats are continually en- 
deavoring to pull acts out of the af- 
fected theatres their efforts have been 
entirely fruitless, the only two addi- 
tional walkouts since last week being 
Walter Percival and Fred Broomstick 
Elliot, who refused to work at the 
Olympia, Lynn. 

The Managers' Association is fully 
prepared for any emergency, having 
double shows listed in every house in 
the danger zone, including the big time 
theatres, where the duplicate shows re- 
port daily on half salary. 

There has been a number of petty 
disturbances in the Gordon theatres, 
but nothing approaching violence has 
been recorded, the strikers merely at- 
tempting to affect business, their tactics 
including the placing of stench bombs 
in the theatres and throwing coins on 
the stage while an act is playing. 

Business has been affected to a small 
degree in Lynn, but the Boston thea- 
tres are running close to normal. 

The Rats are looking anxiously for- 
ward to the possibility of interesting 
stage hands, operators and musicians 
in their difficulty, but inside informa- 
tion has it that those unions will not 
become involved in the strike under 
any circumstances, even if their atti- 
tude forced them to secede from the 
Central Labor Union. 

The majority of the agents who ar- 
rived here with . the opening of the 
strike have returned to New York and 
the balance will leave Thursday, with 
Pat Casey remaining to supervise the 
situation. 

This is taken as an indication the 
managers hold little fears for the im- 
mediate future. 

FitzPatrick, accompanied by several 
local 4.>bor leaders,' visited. Mayor Ci.ir r 
iey this week, but the object of their 
mission is unknown. 

The local people seem to display lit- 
tle interest in the affair and it is doubt- 
ful if their supoort will be forthcoming 
unless a general strike is called, includ- 
ing all theatre help. 

The papers havepassed up the strike 



entirely and beyond the continual 
picketing there is nothing to show a 
strike is iu progress. 

The meeting of the White Rats held 
Thursday (Feb. 8) at Commercial Hall 
was attended by 256 members and 
sympathizers of the organization and 
ran until 3:15 Friday morning. 

The meeting was opened by Geoffrey 
Whalen, who held the chair and who, 
after a short introductory talk, intro- 
duced John Glynn, New England at- 
torney for the Rats. Glynn recounted 
his past efforts in behalf of the organ- 
ization, explained how successful he 
had been in the movement and prom- 
ised his undivided support. Glynn was 
followed by Walter Percival, who 
scored the sentimental hit Percival 
had iust come from Lynn with Mr. 
Whalen and after being introduced 
explained to the gathering illness had 
made it necessary for him to work, 
but he was heartily sorry for appear- 
ing at the Olympia theatre and prom- 
ised he would never disobey again if 
he could procure their forgiveness for 
his rash action. Percival was cheered 
to the echo and returned at once to 
Lynn to prepare an alibi for leaving 
the bill the following day. Before he 
left the hall the Managers' Association 
representatives had selected his suc- 
cessor on the Lynn program. 

Ed McGrady of the local Fireman's 
Union followed Percival and gave the 
members present his word the fire- 
man's union would back every move- 
ment of the Rats. Harry Jennings, 
president of the Boston Central Labor 
Union, said he didn't have much faith 
in the system employed by the Rats 
organization but added the C. L. U. 
would aid them. 

Martin T. Joyce, secretary-treasurer 
of the State branch of the A. F. of L., 
explained a portion of his experience 
as an organizer and labor official and 
cautioned the Rats to stick together 
if they would earn eventual success, 
winding up with a promise to do 
everything he could to make the cur- 
rent move a success. 

Francis J. Gilmour, chief deputy or- 
ganizer of the Rats, complimented the 
small time members of the organiza- 
tion for the hard work they have been 
doing in the local strike, giving the 
women who were attending to the 
picketing an individual notice. 

Bill Frank, a member of the local 
operators' union, but who does not 
hold any official office, promised his 
personal support to the movement and 
said he would try every way possible 
to interest his union in the affair. 
Frank explained he did not represent 
the operators' union in any capacity, 
but merely attended as an individual. 

Frank McCarthy pave a masterly 
speech on the situation and told the 
members present eventually the affair 
would turn their way. promising that 
the A. F. of L. was behind their every 
move. McCarthy is an organizer of 
the A. F. of L. 

President James F'tzPatrick of the 
Rats closed the mec' ng with a speech 
very similar to the one he delivered at 
the Cort theatre, Chicago, and at the 
Bats', slu^house. New York. FitzPat- 
rick went into details as' to the treat 
ment women of the stage were re- 
ceiving at the hands of agents and 
managers and reading affidavits with- 
out mentioning names. His speech 
stirred a number of those present to 
emotional extremes. 

FitzPatrick after the meeting ex- 



pressed his satisfaction at the manner 
i which the labor officials had accept- 
ed his invitation to the meeting and 
said that since His' eotinectiorf with 'the 
Rats he has never been as fully satis- 
fied that organized labor will fall right 
in line behind the actors' organization. 
Of those scheduled to speak at 
the meeting, Frederick Dempsey, 
president of loci 11 of the I. A. T. 
S. E., Frederick Knight, president 
of the Musicians' Protective Union of 
Boston, and John B. Williams, busi- 
ness agent of the Operators' Union, 
failed to appear. Their absence was 
taken by many as an indication the 
allied trades of the stage were not in 
sympathy with the Rats in the local 
trouble, and while none of the Rats 
officials have never made any state- 
ment the stage hands, musicians or 
operators would be called upon for as- 
sistance or a sympathy strike, it was 
generally understood that with a strike 
in progress the Rats would want their 
affiliated locals to walk out 



STRIKELETS. 

Boston, Feb. 14. 
Au additional atalpment of 25 vaudeville 
acta arrived In Boston from New York Mon- 
day morning, those coming here last week for 
emergen or engagements having been routed In 
the surrounding towns for the current week. 
This system, similar to the one Inaugurated 
In the Chicago crisis by John J. Murdoch, 
will probably be kept In vogue until the local 
situation clears. 

At the Bowdoln Square theatre, owned by 
"Doc" Lothrop, the management has erected a 
large, noisy calliope, supplied by Capt. Sorcho, 
Immediately over the lobby entrance. With 
the seven pickets shouting to pedestrians that 
the house Is "unfair to organised labor." the 
music box whirls off a series of popular ditties, 
drowning out the vocal efforts of the striken. 

So-called "peaceful picketing" Is permis- 
sible by law In Lynn. Mass., the two pickets 
arrested there on a charge of disorderly con- 
duct having been discharged by a local Judge. 
Lynn Is the strongest labor union town In New 
England and the verdict was not a surprise. 
The pickets there parade before the two the- 
atres bearing placards on the back which an- • 
nounces the house Is "unfair to organised 
labor." 

At all the Gordon and Lothrop theatres the 
managers have arranged for the projection of 
a slide between arts, the slide announcing that 
the theatre employ? only union stage hands, 
musicians and operators, giving the local num- 
bers of each union and carrying In addltloj 
the local union stamp. Signs are also In 
donee outside the theatres bearing si 
announcements. 

' : ?>> 

The White Rats executives, under the direct 
leadership of Jsmes William FitzPatrick are 
headquartering at the Hotel Brewster. The 
Rat meetings are held at Commercial Hall, 
while nightly gathering- are ie1d In the White 
Rat headquarters or Commercial Hall. The 
managerial gathering Is quartered at the 
Adams Hotel. 




The first evidence of rough work occurred 
Sunday night when a number of White Rat 
sympathisers gathered In the audience at the 
Scollay Square Olympia and showered the 
stage and auditorium with "stench bombs." 
At the other houses pennies were thrown on 
the stage. It Is said President FltsPatrlck 
has given orders to his lieutenants he will not 
tolerate rough work, and will divulge the 
names of the guilty ones to the local police If 
he discovers who they are. 

When the. original strike orders were being 
distributed a delegate of the organisation ap- 
proached a newspaper man who was here 
covering the affair for his paper, and after 
ascertaining If he was working In one of the 
affected theatres called him aside and handed 
him the notice, at the same time receiving as- 
surance the recipient would not work any of 
the theatres during the strike. Without ask- 
ing for any Identification from the scribe, the 
delegate cheerfully explained the organization 
plans In the local affair and merrily strode 
along to complete his mission of distributing 
the strike orders. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Boston 
Central Labor Union will be held Sunday. Just 
what action will be taken in the local White 
Rats affair Is problematical, hut It Is under- 
stood President FltsPatrlck and possibly 
Messrs. Whalen and Olimour will appear be- 
fore the body of delegates and explain the 
situation, at the same time Imploring their co- 
operation. 

A "Scamper of Delight" was held at Com- 
mercial Hall by the Rats Wednesday evening 
(Fob. 14) with a 25-eent admission fee. The 
tlrk.^f. t^tis* in br>rt i:>.rT! "vMh a" valentine on ' 
the back. The affair was not picketed by the 
managers or agents. 

The White Rat officials Jumped to Haverhill, 
Mass., Monday night (Feb. 12) to address the 
labor federation of that city and endeavor to 
land their support In their campaign against 
the Colonial theatre there, which went Into the 
affected list last Thursday. 



DAYTON FAMILY PLIGHT. 

Boston, Feb. 14, 

But little sympathy > ii heard hes«-». 
abouts for any of the acts that "walked 
out" of the Gordons' theatres in Bos- 
ton last week upon a White Rats or- 
der, excepting the Dayton Family of 
12 acrobats. There is a reason for most 
of the other turns leaving their bills and 
breaking their contracts at the behest 
of the Rats, either because they have 
played themselves out of the best 
vaudeville or could secure no further 
engagements in it 

The Dayton Family, however, had a 
full route on the Orpheum Circuit at 
$500 a week, which was canceled the 
day after they left the Boston house on 
"strike." The Daytons were booked 
into the Gordon theatre on an emer- 
gency call, to replace a vacancy left 
through Dan Sherman and Co. refusing 
to return to Boston for one week, which 
Sherman was asked to play. 

In the Dayton family are seven Day- 
tons, two husbands and two wives, two 
children and a relative. They are re- 
ported to have lately purchased a small 
farm near Providence, where they ex- 
pected to make their permanent home, 
and looked forward to the Orpheum 
Circuit engagement to leave the prop- 
erty free and clear. 

As some of the biggest circus man- 
agements are associated with the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, the Dayton Family, a circus 
act, may find summer engagements for 
them under canvas also less plentiful 
than they, have been. 

The Daytons are reported to have 
accepted statements made to them by 
White Rats, in ignorance of the real 
reason why the strike was called (to 
bring money to the Rata). It is said 
the Daytons "walked," thinking; they 
were doing an honorable action as 
vaudeville artists to their brother pro- 
fessionals, without considering what 
would happen to them or what the Rata 
could do tor them when there should 
be no more work in sight 

An intelligent actor approached last 
week by the Rats, and among the com- 
mittee were, it is said, the two best 
known White Rata now here, held the 
following reported conversation with 
them: 

C. — We want you to walk out when 
called. 

A.— What for? 

C. — We're going on strike. 

A. — Where do I go next week? 

C. — We don't know. 

A.— Well, you had better find out if 
you want me to make a fool 6f myself 
for yon. 

The committee is said to have faded 
from sight without answering. 



M1NTYRE AND HEATH CANARD. 

Monday night at the Palace. New 
York, while Mclntyre and Heath were 
playing their "Georgia Minstrels" 
sketch, a. woman in the audience who 
afterward said she had only gone to 
the Palace to see the blackface come- 
dians, went into a hysterical laughing 
fit and had to be removed to a waiting 
room. 

Tuesday the White Rats attempted 
to spread a report the woman had been 
"planted" and there were other dis- 
turbances in the Palace the same eve- 
ning while the act was on, such as 
laughter at the wrong time, coughing 
and noises in the gallery. The report 
seemed aimed against Mclntyre and 
Heath because of their recent letter ad- 
vocating the National Vaudeville 
Artists. 

The Palace staff denied any of the dis- 
turbances reported, excepting the hys- 
terical woman, ajtfpt>ec than from th c 
Rats sources Tuesday no one appeared 
to have heard about them. 



Murdock in Chicago for a Day 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 
John J. Murdock came to Chicago 
Saturday, leaving the next day. 









VAUDEVILLE 



mm 



BOSTON STRIKE CALLED TO 

MONEY-MOUNTFORD 



AaS NOT GIVING UP. 



*■>>■ #• » » *>»►*•-■*»*■* ^ 




RaU Leader Makes Somp Remarkable Admissions at Closed 

Meeting in Chicago. Says Rats Coffers Are Empty and 

Collect $7 from 56 Members Present Although 

English Subject, Mountford Offers His 

Services to President Wilson. 



Chicago, Feb. 14. 

At the closed meeting of the White 
Rats here last Friday night some rather 
interesting admissions were made by 
Harry Mountford. He confirmed that 
the White Rat coffers were empty, a 
condition that has been apparent for 
some time, when he declared that the 
"war" had been personally financed by 
James W. FitzPatrick and Himself for 
the past thr4e weeks. He earnestly 
pleaded for funds, with the result that 
from the 56 members present $7 was 
collected. 

The plans for the rehabilitation of the 

treasury, Mountford hoped, would pan 
out beyond expectations. The most im- 
portant was the five per cent levy, and 
he explained that the Boston strike wal 
solely called as an excuse to make the 
levy for a war fund. 4ie believed sup- 
port would come from Rat members in 
burlesque, which after all held a higher 
percentage of White Rats than does 
vaudeville. He spoke of the White Rat 
ball to be held March 16 as holding 
large possibilities for revenue. 

When Joe Birnes, the Chicago deputy 
organizer, suggested some expression 
of loyalty be made to President Wilson 
in the light of recent events, Mount- 
ford, although English born and not an 
American citizen, put forth a resolu- 
tion extending to the President his 
services in any capacity and the back- 
ing of the organization he represented. 

Mountford said the present Rat 
troubles dated from the time "Variety 
was bought out by the U. B. O." He 
advised the meeting he would be gone 
away for about three weeks, and Satur- 
day morning pulled one of his trick get- 
a-ways, departing for St Louis, there 
to meet Ernest Carr, who had pro- 
ceeded him and George W. Sarjeant, 
the deputy organizer there. His stay 
was short and he returned Monday 
morning. In some quarters it was re- 
ported Sarjeant has collected some 
money, and it was that which took 
Mountford to St Louis. 

In the closed meeting Mountford 
further remarked about the Boston af- 
fair, that because the Gordon brothers 
failed to support a closed shop, al- 
though they were supposed to be in- 
dependents, the strike had been called 
against them. By so doing, he said, 
the Gordons were forced in the U. B. 
O. and had already signed a six-year 
booking agreement 

The six-year arrangement between 
the Gordons and the United Booking 
offices is not known of here, outside of 
Mountford's statement 



"PHONEY" "BLOODSHED" REPORTS 

The Vaudeville Managers' Protective 
Association has taken cognizance of the 
"scare reports" spread by White Rats, 
in speeches before members and 
through personal talks to the effect 
there is plenty of "bloodshed" in the 
Rats strike proceedings, and actors Rat 
"walking out" at the command of the 
Rats or playing a theatre the Rats de- 
clare is "unfair' will be "beaten up." 

The V. M. P. A. has been impelled 
to offer to protect playing acts through 
the energy displayed by certain Rats 
in spreading these unfounded reports. 

The managers when first apprised of 



the Rats "bloodshed" campaign did not 
believe artists would place any faith in 
it, but the continuous stories being told 
of this person or that being injured, all 
the reports emanating miles away from 
the place the "beating up" was supposed 
to have occurred, decided to make 
it plain to those acts these reports were 
intended for that the V. M. P. A. will 
go iO any lengths to protect all acts 
playing in its theatres and the same 
lengths to prosecute those who unlaw- 
fully intimidate. 

The V. M. P. A. has also asked for a 
legal opinion as to the> possibility of 
proceeding against the degraders of the 
women in vaudeville. Acts have been 
incited often cf late by speeches 
against the professional woman in 
which she is held up as a prey for 
agents- and managers. A couple of in- 
stances, with but one of those appar- 
ently well based, have been repeated 
time and time again without any addi- 
tions or other similar matters cited to 
show the condition claimed is a com- 
mon one, to leave the impression the 
Rats organization is seeking to correct 
an evil which doesn't exist. 

The V. M. P. A. announced this week 
it was through with giving the waning 
activities of the White Rats any fur- 
ther attention and it was stated by an 
officer of the Association acts in sym- 
pathy with the Rats had better declare 
themselves now, for it would be later 
discovered by the managers when those 
acts would be forever "blacklisted" in 
regular vaudeville by all members of 
the V. M. P. A. 

The attention of the V. M. P. A. was 
called to complaints made by some acts 
that "walked out" in Boston last week 
that if proper protection had been given 
them, they would have appeared at the 
theatres. The acts say they were un- 
able to reach the theatres through peo- 
ple who claimed they were White Rats 
barring their passage to the stage en- 
trance. Threats were made to these 
acts, they claim, and in some instances, 
according to the complaints, the threats 
prevailed. ' 

Reports from Boston since the "walk 
outs" relate that if the Gordon theatres' 
managements had called upon the po^ 
lice to preserve the peace near their 
stage doors when the strike was called, 
hardly any of the acts that did "walk 
out" would have become involved in the 
Rats strike. 

In New York since the strike started 
James Marco and the Potts Brothers 
have been active at the Grand Central 
Station trying to indce acts leaving for 
Boston to remain in New York. No 
success on their part has been reported. 



HARRY KELLY RESIGNS. 

Harry Kelly, a life member of the 
White Rats and now appearing in "The 
Century Girl" at the Century theatre, 
his resigned from the order. 

His reason is said to be his objection 

to the present policy of the organiza- 

, • • • ■ >.#.-'•.•- - 

tion. 

A similar reason was given by Fred 
Mace, who also lately resigned from 
the Rats, although a life member of it. 
Mr. Mace and Mr. Kelly resigned vol- 
untarily. Neither has any intention of 
playing in vaudeville. 



The "raw" effort to get money from 

actors, made "by the White Rats last 

week through an "assessment" of five 

per cent upon the salaries of working 

acts to pay salaries of Rats officers not 

working, has met with no success in 
either New York. Boston or Chicago, 
from reports reaching Broadway. 

The assessment" order called upon 
the easily gulled to send their money 
to Harry Mountford in Chicago or 
James VV. FitzPatrick in Boston. 

FitzPatrick in Boston is reported to 
have said after Variety published the 
story of the assessment last week that 
that was the best thing Variety had 
ever done for the Rats. FitzPatrick 
added Varibtt carried it to the actors 
the Rats wanted to hear of it 

People who profess to know the ac- 
tor say the Rats have very little 
chance of securing the five per cent 
from the working act or any portion 
of it The only money the Rats could 
look for, they say, is from acts jn sym- 
pathy with the organization, and the 
acts in sympathy with the present pol- 
icy of the Rats are not working, which 
usually is the reason. 



FITZPATRICK IN CHARGE. 

Chicago, Feb. 14. 

The impression is spreading that 

James W. FitzPatrick, president of the 

White Rats, has superseded Harry 

Mountford as the actual director in 
charge of that organization. 
Although the Boston strike was ap- 

?arentlv brought on without Mount- 
ord's knowledge, the signs now point 
to Mountford having promoted that af- 
fair, if not actually causing it, to secure 
funds as per the Rats order to levy five 
Der cent, upon working player's salary. 
Mountford's own admission to a sim- 
ilar effect at the Rats meeting last Fri- 
day night appears to have clinched this 
belief around town just now. 

At the same time it looks as though 
FitzPatrick took the bull by the horns 
and started in himself to make a finish 
for the Rats regardless of Mountford, 
whose continued stalling tactics may 
have finally put an end to FitzPatriclrs 
patience, the latter wanting action to 
appease the members, who had heard 
enough talk, as they told him. Mount- 
ford probably realized the consequences, 
of a precipitate step that could end but 
in one way and would, mean oblivion 
for himself and all other "leaders" of 
actors who were not acting, in the 
future. 

Since the Rats levied the assessment 
with, instructions to send the money di- 
rect to FitzPatrick or Mountford 
(which* has recalled the story of the 
partners who opened the mail first) 
Mountford has not been reported start- 
ing any new -bank accounts, although 
he still goes through his daily routine, 
talking to labor people, visiting the fed- 
eral authorities and then airing his 
"Tux" in the lobby of the hotel after 
dark. 



PICKETING A BALLYHOO. 

Haverhill, Mass., Feb. 14. 

The White Rats picketing the Col- 
onial here has turned out to be a good 
business ballyhoo for the house, the 
patronage increasing during it. The 
stage hands and musicians in the the- 
atre are union, and acts playing here 
have had nothing but praise for the 
theatre. 

The Colonial plays two performances 
daily. It is managed by James Sayer, 
ownld by Kahn Bros., has a seating 
capacity of 1,800, and plays five acts to 
a bill. 

The Rats' las'f Thursday attempted to 
persuade the program then opening to 
walk out, but were unsuccessful, al- 
though the Rats' representatives man- 
aged to thoroughly frighten two young 
girls who composed a sister act 

If you don't advartlM to VARIETY, 
don't ndvortlM. 



CINCINNATI WALK-OUTS. 

Chicago, Feb. 14* 

It .was reported -he*c latfc thit .«{ t*ff* 
noon two acts had walked out of the 
Empress theatre, Cincinnati, this p. m. 
It's looked upon as a, White Rat house 
through having been reported as only 
booking White Rat acts of late. The 
affiliated Booking Agency of this city 
is belieyed to place the bills there. 

No reason is given in connection 
with the report why the Rats should 
attempt to start a strike at a theatre 
engaging only its members. 

Another report this afternoon said 
the Rats were preparing to distribute 
circulars against some St Louis small 
time theatres. 

Threats made to order a strike at 
Kansas City have not been carried out 
so far. 

A late rumor is that the Rats has de- 
termined to announce a suspension of 
hostilities until later, depending at 
present upon their imposing of an as- 
sessment of 5 per cent to carry them 
along for the present 

At the offices of the Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Protective Association it was 
said late Wednesday night that the 
Empress, Cincinnati, was not a mem- 
ber of the association and the V. M. P. 
A. would give no attention to any dis- 
turbance there. 



"ELUSIVE" MOUNTFORD. 

^Chicago, Feb. 14. 

Harry Mountford intended to leave 
for St Louis Saturday morning but 
tried to keep his destination a secret 

Mountford left his hotel, jumped into 
a taxi, changed to another one on the 
way to the station, hopped on an 
Omaha train at the depot and hopped 
off it as the train was pulling out, final- 
ly planting himself in the St Louis Ex- 
press, doing all of the dodging within 
10 minutes. 

TABU RATS' MEETING. 

The Tuesday night meeting of the 
White Rats was a very tame affair and 
the shortest session the organisation 
has held in New York for some time. 

Eddie Clark presided. Those pres- 
ent were assured the Rats were win- 
ning the Boston Strike and the cus- 
tomary weekly statements were once 
again mentioned. 

About 150 were present 



WALTER PERCIVAL "THROUGH." 

Boston, Mats., Feb. 14. 

Walter Percival supplied the star 
laugh of the proceedings last Friday 
when he called the Boston branch of 
the United Booking Offices to explain 
that he couldn't appear at the matinee 
because of illness. Percival opened at 
the Olympia, Lynn, Thursday (Feb. 8). 
and after doing three shows, was visited 
by Geoffrey Whalen, who induced him 
to attend the Thursday night meeting 
of the White Rats in Boston and de- 
sert the program the following day. 

Percival attended the meeting in 
Boston and promised the gathering his 
full support. Returning to Lynn early 
Friday morning after the meeting, he 
solicited the aid of a Lynn physician to 
procure a certificate of illness, but 
tailed, the physician refusing to give 
him a certificate. 

Percival then called the U. B. O. and 
endeavored to explain to Pat Casey he 
was unable to make the matinee. Casey 
asked him if he had been in Boston, 
and Percival denied that he had left 
Lynn since his arrival there, whereupon 
Casey, with the usual preliminary 
speech, told Percival that he was 
through as far as the V. M. P. A. the- 
atres were concerned, and for a con- 
vinces 'Cafley '-rofrd *ta Pereivai- ito 
speech he had made the night previous. 

Walter Percival and Co. were can- 
celed on the Moss time after the Bos- 
ton incident. They played the first 
three days of this week for Loew on an 
unbreakable contract, but were then 
taken off all Loew routings. 



8 

c= 



VARIETY 



CABARETS 






New York's principal cabarets intend 
giving up their "club" charters, in order 
to retain their all-night licenses. This 
was decided upon Wednesday at the 
weekly meeting of the Restaurateurs' 
Association. A committee was to be 
appointed to call on Mayor Mitchel 
yesterday (Thursday) and make the 
tender. The only two prominent cab- 
arets not members of the Association 
are Rector